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Metric Dial gauges

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  • mike4
    replied
    I really dont want to continue , but I wont be bothering to post any measurements here again as everyone seems to get upset because I CHOOSE to drop some digits off when casually speaking about an approximate conversion put there for those who only seem to understand the imperial system .

    I dont get upset by using a different approach but everyone else seems to , however when I am working with any instrument I will READ THE SPECIFICATIONS for the part and work to them , but when discussing a measurement I do and always will drop digits as I dont like to bury people in BS.

    I am also seriously considering spending more time working than posting here and being criticised for thinking differently from the others who like to impress with numerical splendor.

    I should also point out that this site is not as interesting as it once was , possibly because I am interested in actual machining not picking up people on ridiculous points of procedure .

    These comments are not aimed at any particular persons.



    Michael

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  • mike4
    replied
    I really dont want to continue , but I wont be bothering to post any measurements here again as everyone seems to get upset because I CHOOSE to drop some digits off when casually speaking about an approximate conversion put there for those who only seem to understand the imperial system .

    I dont get upset by using a different approach but everyone else seems to , however when I am working with any instrument I will READ THE SPECIFICATIONS for the part and work to them , but when discussing a measurement I do and always will drop digits as I dont like to bury people in BS.

    I am also seriously considering spending more time working than posting here and being criticised for thinking differently from the others who like to impress with numerical splendor.

    I should also point out that this site is not as interesting as it once was , possibly because I am interested in actual machining not picking up people on ridiculous points of procedure .

    These comments are not aimed at any particular persons.



    Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • Circlip
    replied
    Strange, you gave the graduations of a metric dial gauge, eventually added the metric tolerance of the bearing you're measuring but cloud the issue with an infernal size and just to add, it's 3937 not 394. (add yer own zeros)

    Regards Ian.

    Leave a comment:


  • MaxxLagg
    replied
    Not to hijack the thread but all this talk about metric dial gauges reminded me that I have one just laying about that I have no need for whatsoever. I would be willing to send this one (almost) free of charge to one of my Canuck or Brit friends on the board for the price of postage. It MAY cost more to send across the pond or up North than it's worth to you. I don't know. All I'd ask in return if you're interested is when you send postage you throw in a Loonie or Toonie or maybe a Dollar note if you're in Canada or if across the pond a British pound coin or note. Or whatever. PM me if you're interested and we'll work something out. Not interested in making any money on it, just suggested the coinage as a way to get something of little value from you but of a curiosity value to me and you get a tool that you can use. Not interested in Canadian pennies, nickels, dimes or quarters. We get enough of those down here. .

    http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i3...g/DSC03439.jpg

    http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i3...g/DSC03438.jpg

    http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i3...g/DSC03440.jpg

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  • mike4
    replied
    Peter,
    I work as required and often do not have the luxury or waiting for a person employed at a business to return from holidays to provide information which the manufacturer do not list on their website .

    My business is 24/7 365 on call by my choosing not anyone elses .

    I dont work to conventional ideas , if i need to I will work for 24 hours straight to get the job completed then have a sleep , but if required I will turn up at work on the next afternoon .

    I wont get involved with the niceties of discussing the finer points of measurements any more as it isnt worth the time.

    As I said in the first post all I wanted was the rod and thread size , I I knew and someone asked me I would tell them without the other discussion which arose.

    I like to keep it simple , I am actually put off by anyone who goes around with an attitude of it being necessary to go into the finer points of measurement instead of just getting on with the task at hand .

    I can and do use precision daily but its just part of the job , job over all measurements written on jobsheet and customer charged , finished move onto next task .

    I dont mind if others wish to discuss the matter but not ever on my time , that is why I have not employed any permanent staff for five years apart from the high costs , people tend to treat employment as a problem with their social life .

    Michael

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  • Peter.
    replied
    It's a discussion forum Mike. People will offer what they think might be a valid point even if it isn't what you might want them to say. If the only reply you expected was a simple "m5 x 0.8mm" then an email to Mitutoyo would have got you that and you could have saved all the extraneous interaction. Of course, you'd miss out on the rich diversity of ideas and information that comes along with the forum but that's your call - some people enjoy it, others less so.

    Leave a comment:


  • mike4
    replied
    I am not going to post the measurements of any instrument again as every time the post is mis- interpreted , I only really wanted to know what thread and the diameter of the rod for the gauge .

    I will not alter any instrument which I have just purchased but thanks for the suggestion.

    Michael

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    You can always re tap it with an imperial thread although even in imperial USA it should be easy enough to get one. Alistair

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  • C_lazy_F_Guns
    replied
    Originally posted by mike4 View Post
    I have often had to remove 0.01 mm and thats with portable equipment , hired for the job when the precision part wont fit because it was made to the specified tolerances , but should have been slightly smaller or larger in diameter using a shaft as an example.
    Do it every day, call it fitting-up . . . It’s usually made easer measure accurately and rounding to the needed tolerance be it 10mm, 1mm, 0.1mm, 0.01mm, or 0.001mm.


    Originally posted by mike4 View Post
    I do not have to justify the methods used because they work and customers are happy.
    No, you don’t and I for one don’t care what you do or how you do it. But you could maybe wise conceder maybe, just could be by some small chance some valid reason your way through up red flags to so many. Do you have the Mother watching her kid march in the band story down-under? “Look at that, my kid id the only one marching in step!”


    Could be we busy body perfectionists types were only trying to help you not repeat our costley mistakes?


    Anyway, I never meant to fray any of your nerves and I’m sorry for saying anything about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yow Ling
    replied
    In my world 0.01mm is more or less exactly half a thou.

    Leave a comment:


  • mike4
    replied
    EddyCurr ,
    Thanks for that link,.
    RichR , thats the way that I think 19mm approx 3/4 some bolt sizes are almost equal as are some threads for a lot of practical purposes , high tolerance or high stress then go for exact replacements.
    Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • RichR
    replied
    Hi Michael
    It is obvious that many prefer to be totally correct at all times
    I think the objection is that you made the approximation by truncating rather than rounding. I use approximations every time an
    inch based wrench won't fit because a bolt happens to have a metric head (or vice versa). I use 0.04"=1mm because I can do the
    math in my head and the answer will be close enough to pick the right wrench.

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Originally posted by mike4 View Post
    I recently purchased a Mituyo 1160 ... the grubscrew is missing ...
    ... 5mm 0.8 pitch will screw in easily ...
    Were you successful in finding a replacement ?

    FWIW - I had success when I approached Mitutoyo Canada seeking a replacement part
    for one of their instruments. There may be a representative more local, but this one
    apparently services Aus
    M.T.I Qualos Pty. Ltd.
    55 Northern Road,
    West Heidelberg,
    Vic. 3081
    (61)3-9450 1900 Ph
    (61)3-9458 3217 Fax
    [email protected]
    http://www.mitutoyo.com.au

    The above is from Mitutoyo's Asia/Pacific page

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • mike4
    replied
    It is obvious that many prefer to be totally correct at all times , I would like to know how many of the people are or have worked in the field where often parts are machine to "fit and work" where we have to make a part fit either by removing a small amount of material or build up and machine to size .
    All of the time having to work with equipment that is often assembled from parts which are sourced from the cheapest supplier by the OEM's .

    I have often had to remove 0.01 mm and thats with portable equipment , hired for the job when the precision part wont fit because it was made to the specified tolerances , but should have been slightly smaller or larger in diameter using a shaft as an example .

    I do not have to justify the methods used because they work and customers are happy.

    I dont often have to worry about the 0.0000937 of an inch with most of the gear that I work with and the indicator only had to show how much the shaft was moving at each end so that I could determine which bearing was causing the vibration .

    I was measuring a total movement of 1 division which was 0.01 mm this was enough to cause what felt like a bent shaft to the operator .

    If I have to there are instruments available to allow detection of the amount in question but as its not always necessary to go to those tolerances I have only had to hire it twice in ten years.

    Michael

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  • jep24601
    replied
    Originally posted by Peter. View Post
    Sorry to correct you but it's actually almost 0.0004" (0.000394")
    Yes, 0.01mm is around 0.0004". It is not close to being around 0.0003" by about (around?) 25% to 33%

    Leave a comment:

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