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  • Collets

    Late 70's Taiwan Jet 1024P Lathe with milling attachment.

    I'm looking for information on mounting cutting tools, such as end mills, to the lathe? My chinese mini mill uses R8 Collets and a drawbar, would it be a similar system here?

    The manual says this machine has...

    Taper in spindle nose bush No.4 Morse
    Taper of spindle centre No.2 Morse

    Your advice is much appreciated.

  • #2
    Hi,

    Sound like your mill spindle has a Morse taper. This wasn't/isn't uncommon for small milling machines, though R8 has over taken them in popularity for mills. A mill collet with a Morse taper has a threaded hole for a draw bar, just like the R8, to securely retain the tool while milling. Morse taper mill collets are still easily available new from a number of sources. I believe Little Machine shop offers them as one example.

    dalee
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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    • #3
      I have just put them in the 4 jaw and dialed them in.

      For your lathe, from what you wrote it sounds like the spindle has a MT4 taper and a MT4-MT2 reducing bushing that came with the lathe as well as a center with a MT2 taper.
      Last edited by oxford; 01-26-2014, 01:50 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SirLesPatterson View Post
        Late 70's Taiwan Jet 1024P Lathe with milling attachment.
        I have exactly the same machine. I made a M4-R8 adapter by starting with a soft M4-M3 adapter, cutting off the tang and boring to fit R8. Then fashion a simple drawbar, and a knockout bar.

        http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...xist-in-canada

        http://www.mscdirect.com/product/00070342

        If you're interested, here's something on my milling adapter. Note that the photos show a 4C collet adapter on the spindle, not the R8.

        http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...or-lathe/page2

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        • #5
          Originally posted by oxford View Post
          I have just put them in the 4 jaw and dialed them in.
          +1 on that. The extra jaw's better but I just chucked 'em in the 3-jaw before I got a mill and never had any trouble with slippage. It's not like you're going to be hogging huge amounts of metal with a (usually) flimsy milling attachment. I tried a 3MT collet & drawbar directly up the spout to hold a 5/8" endmill but I think the hellacious pounding it took to get it back out is what killed my spindle bearings.
          Milton

          "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

          "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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          • #6
            A 3 jaws grip is crappy at best.
            The scroll is the reason.
            4 jaw grips much better.
            Be all of that, milling in the lathe is hack at best.--

            --Doozer
            DZER

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Doozer View Post
              A 3 jaws grip is crappy at best.
              The scroll is the reason.
              4 jaw grips much better.
              Be all of that, milling in the lathe is hack at best.--

              --Doozer
              Milling with a lathe is substantially better than not milling at all.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                Be all of that, milling in the lathe is hack at best.----Doozer
                Originally posted by epanzella View Post
                Milling with a lathe is substantially better than not milling at all.
                I want to take full advantage of this equipment. It came with what appears to be a very solid milling attachment. The previous owner took a Myford swiveling vertical slide and a Myford 1467 long cross slide table. He told me he had the cross slide table machined to fit the cross slide dovetail on the Jet lathe. Sure enough, this evening I did a mockup. Removed the lathe's cross slide and instead fit this slotted table in its place. The vertical slide then bolts to it. Seems ultra rugged. The robustness of this lathe appeals to me vs. my mini mill. It's good to have options anyhow so I will get some experience then see about making the collet adapter.

                Thanks everyone.
                Last edited by SirLesPatterson; 01-26-2014, 09:06 PM. Reason: typo

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                • #9
                  While probably not the cheapest, you could always go with a MT4 to er collet holder. http://www.shars.com/products/view/2..._Collet_Holder

                  http://www.shars.com/products/view/1...pcs_Collet_Set

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                  • #10
                    ER Collet chucks come with MT shanks and are intended for holding tools as opposed to 5C which are more oriented for work holding. This is a 5C being used to hold a drill.
                    Byron Boucher
                    Burnet, TX

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                    • #11
                      Yes, just but a MT4-ER32 collet chuck from CTC tools inexpensively, pick up the collets you needs while you're at it, and fabricate a simple drawbar for your spindle. Problem solved.

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                      • #12
                        What I get from the OP is that :

                        Yes, he has a mini mill, and a 10 x 24 Jet lathe.

                        But he thinks (and may be correct) that the lathe milling attachment may be sturdier than the mini-mill.

                        Now, I would have thought a "mini-mill" that takes an R8 is less "mini" than some, but the HF mini-mill claims an R8 so maybe the OP has a real "mini" mill.

                        And, teh Jet 1024P is NOT the 10 x 20 "tiny lathe jacked up on stilts" that is so common these days, it's pretty sturdy-looking, and may be sturdier when milling than the mini-mill.

                        https://www.google.com/search?q=jet+...l%3B1200%3B572

                        Short story is that there are several options, including at least the following:

                        1) use a 4MT collet, directly in the spindle, as an end mill holder. Or a 2MT with adapter.

                        2) Use a 4MT end mill holder directly in the spindle, or a 2MT version in the adaptor. I like this because I find the EM holders to be very solid and repeatable.

                        3) Make a 4MT to R8 adaptor, and use that

                        4) use some other type of collet, such as ER, in an adaptor mounted in the spindle, or in the 2MT adaptor.

                        All will work, all have drawbacks, and advantages.

                        Pro:

                        The R8 he has the collets for.

                        The ER is possibly the most useful for other things as well, since EWR collets hold a wide range of non-standard sizes of stock or tools. Other collets hold only a narrow range of sizes.

                        The end mill holder is the most solid solution.

                        The R8 holder might be set back into the spindle and be pretty doggone solid.

                        Con:

                        All the collet type holders will let tools slide around if not made very tight.

                        The end mill holder sticks out pretty far, as does the ER collet holder.

                        The 4MT and 2MT collets are hard to get to release, the R8 or ER is easier.

                        The R8 holder would probably need to be made.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions

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