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  • Small question

    Now that the weather has warmed and the garage shop is again usable I have started this past weekend on restoring the 2HP Strand gearhead drill press that I got for Christmas. I took the 16" cast iron table off and hauled it down to the job shop in town to have it faced off. They did a nice job, cleaned it up very well. But, there are a few small partial holes where someone drilled into the table and I would like to fill them with something that looks as much like the cast iron as possible. Suggestions?

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  • #2
    They really bother you that much?

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    • #3
      Evan, you can get close with JB weld mixed with cast iron filings, but it will look iffy at best. How about drilling the holes through and using iron bar machined to dia as plugs? That will look pretty good (I think) and won't leave a soft spot on the table.

      Good Luck

      Alex
      Alex

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      • #4
        Bill,

        Yes, they bother me.

        Alex, I don't think I could bring myself to drill through the table. I also don't think such small soft spots present any problem. This is only about appearance.
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        • #5
          I have seen a few table and way "hickkey's"filled with lead and or tin solder,it stays put.I have myself glued on a overlay table out of thin(12ga.)sheet,just match the slots close as possible and attach with a thin coat of epoxy.I did that to a belt sander platten that was screwed up royal,I use 1/8" polished stainless and attached it with an epoxy called plumber's seal,its been five years with lots of heat and vibration and its still going strong.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            www.caswellplating.com has a pit filler called Pitstop. It is a 2 part epoxy resin loaded with pure silver. It is used to repair flaws and then the item is plated. I am just getting into the plating hobby. How about a nickel plated drill press table?

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            • #7
              OK, how about treating the holes like a wood worker would. Instead of drilling through the table, turn some CI plugs and tap in like a furniture maker filling screw holes with wood plugs.


              Alex
              Alex

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              • #8
                I like the lead idea Wierd. Pretty close to the same color and easy to do. Can also be reversed easily if it doesn't turn out.
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                • #9
                  Hello Evan
                  On my old Dewalt Drill Press i Drilled through and put cast iron plugs in. I then Srapped the table flat, you cannot see them at all unless you look at the bottom.
                  Steve

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                  • #10
                    I wish I could get a picture of the vice on a bridgeport in our maintainance department. There is nothing left of the surface in front of the solid jaw. Practically drilled in two!

                    Super Dave
                    Super Dave
                    RapidtoCNC.com

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                    • #11
                      Evan, I had a similar problem with an antique drill press. I went to the local welding supply and picked up a castaloy rod for welding cast iron. Some friends have even welded and repaired old flathead Ford engine blocks.
                      Pat

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                      • #12
                        I have a large CNC mill that has some "repair" spots on the table. These were done at the factory in what appear to be voids in the original casting.

                        The table is cast iron, the repairs are a more silver colored metal. I wonder what process and material was used. The only clue that anything was done is the slight color difference visible on close examination.

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                        • #13
                          I would not use lead, not because it is toxic, but because it will loosen up in time. Drill and tap and install cast iron plugs using a two part epoxy on the threads, or find some Devcon Steel filler.

                          ------------------
                          Paul G.
                          Paul G.

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                          • #14
                            Evan,

                            I like the CI plug idea and don't see any reason why you would have to drill all the way through the tabled to install them. Just get a clean sided hole and a short plug to fit. I bet you could make the plugs a bit oversized and use a shrink fit for a permanent bond.

                            Paul A.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            Make it fit.
                            You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                            • #15
                              The cast iron plug idea sounds good except for the two holes on the edge of the slot. I would not think that it would be wise to try a press or shrink fit on those holes. I'd be afraid of cracking the iron. I think I will try some of the Devcon on those holes. Thanks for the ideas guys.
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