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OT: My $3500 screwdriver

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  • OT: My $3500 screwdriver

    A friend just gifted me a snazzy 36volt screwdriver. It's a DESOUTTER S5V2. Apparently it measures torque, angle, and all sorts of stuff. Unfortunately it did not come with the $4000 controller box. He has a few of the screwdrivers, obtained via surplus.

    I'm not sure what I can best do with it. I'd love to find a service manual, or specs on the control box. The connector has a bunch of pins, maybe 8 or 10. I assume it's a servo with an encoder, and probably some other trickery. It activates when you put pressure on the tip. It's too bad it isn't one of the low profile right angle versions. It might be worth figuring out how to control and drive it with an arudino.

    It is made in England!

    I couldn't find anything on this model, just these newer versions.

    http://www.flexibleassembly.com/Prod.../615-165-443-0
    http://www.flexibleassembly.com/Prod...IC-Controllers


    From a simple run down up to complex sequence applications, with up to 20 phases and 250 cycles to optimize speed, accuracy and operator comfort on every joint.

    Tightening strategies

    Torque + angle monitoring

    Angle + torque monitoring

    Torque + angle + torque rate

    Prevailing torque

    Yield point

    Stall torque

    Torque & angle

    Detection of plastic zone area of the joint

    Additional torque + angle transducers

    Self tapping

    Current monitoring

  • #2
    Are you going to use it for electronics assembly? That's usually what these things are used with. You can dial in the torque to very exact measures so your tight but not so tight to break an board or component.
    Steve

    My youtube:
    http://www.youtube.com/MyShopNotes

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    • #3
      Originally posted by schor View Post
      Are you going to use it for electronics assembly? That's usually what these things are used with. You can dial in the torque to very exact measures so your tight but not so tight to break an board or component.
      OK, some components can be broken, but "break a board"? Have you ever tried to break a fiberglass PCB? It isn't easy. Even the cheap, non fiberglass ones are hard to break while tightening a screw that passes through them. In over 45 years of electronic maintenance and design I have never seen a single PCB that was broken by tightening a screw. Never!

      You need a lot better reason than that to buy and use a $3500 screw driver. The only place I ever had a need for torque control in my electronic work was in changing the video heads in some of the helical scan video recorders. And a $100 or $200, spring and scale, torque screwdriver worked just fine there.
      Paul A.

      Make it fit.
      You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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      • #4
        My buddy used to buy lots of military surplus, so that is likely where these came from. This is a device that can get a certified torque calibration.

        Assuming I could get it working by cobbling a controller, I'm not sure where I would use it. It seems I do more large scale tearing apart of stuff than assembly. And in the case where I might mfg a run of gadgets, I don't expect the torque of screws would be a major concern.

        As for simple mass assembly, with screws going into plastic bosses that can strip, I'm sure simple clutches are adequate.

        I'd like to take a peak inside, but I'd prefer a blown-apart drawing before I do. The outside is rather plain plastic, and it might be mistaken for a cheap die grinder or screwdriver. We are curious how it measures toque. Whether there is a strain guage. It seems like it would need to be more sophisticated than current or pulses delivered to a stepper or servo, but maybe not.

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        • #5
          Problem is they are just as easy to loose costing $3500 as a poundland one...................
          .

          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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