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RE: Windows XP support ending soon. New computer specs?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by cuemaker View Post
    I am in the same line of thought as gellfex...If you look, I posted my specs.. but I am a big computer gamer, who enjoys overclocking and I have the disposable income to put together very nice computer systems.

    Let me see if Dell will let me post a system or something that will be sufficient. My only question is video cards.. since I game, I have always have had highend cards, so I dont know the limits of CPU based video...

    Here you go.. even comes with a passable video card...

    http://www.dell.com/us/p/xps-8700/pd...el_id=xps-8700

    Here is something from Newegg.. a little cheaper even...http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboB...=Combo.1535055
    It doesnt have an OS..FYI

    How about this one? Cheaper but looks to have near the same specs.

    http://www.dell.com/us/p/inspiron-66...=inspiron-660s

    Oh...Win 8 vs. 7.
    Bugger.
    8 can't be all THAT bad, is it?
    Last edited by QSIMDO; 02-03-2014, 08:56 PM.
    Len

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    • #32
      Not all that bad...key difference, 3rd gen cpu (no big deal) and no extra vid card...I cant answer if that matters much.. but you can always add a vid card for not a whole lot...

      But I like the Newegg deal better..
      Last edited by cuemaker; 02-03-2014, 09:44 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
        That's another thing about the new Intel processors. Many of them have integrated GPUs and most of the i7 models will smoke a $100-$150 video card. To do better you have to move to a $300-$400 video card. Spend that money on a better i7 and don't skimp on the motherboard either. Buy cheap, get cheap goes with the cliché of you get what you pay for.

        I'm not a gamer. I use my PC for a few business applications, TV tuner/recorder, Word, Excel and the internet. But... I like the snappy response I get from an i7, 8Gb memory and a SSD for the system and programs. Data and backup are on separate HDDs.
        can you post a link about this? i'm no doubting you, but i want to see where the breakoff point is now. i've built and maintained dozens of computers over the years, and there has never been a case (until now?) when a quality discrete card did not perform better than an integrated one. i did a little searching and the only thing i found about it was comparisons of an i7 with the intel 4000 vs. an nvidia 650m. the mobile nvidia chipsets have always been about the same performance as the previous desktop graphics, so i can see where an integrated i7 solution might be viable. the only difference being that the i7 is already $100 more than an i5, and my experience has been that the gamer will choose the i5 with discrete graphics - in this case that $100 will buy a gtx650, and if you catch a sale, a gtx650ti. i'm still skeptical of the i7 integrated vs. the i5 gtx650(ti) system. maybe i can learn something here - i will admit i am way out of date, as i haven't needed to build a new pc in ages. this is my current system:

        core2duo 3.0ghz, 4gb ddr2, (2) 8800gts 320mb. i just recently upgraded to windows7 64 from vista 32 (it ran flawlessly for years) because i finally snagged a matching video card for sli off ebay and it brought me down to 2.5gb of ram, which was way too low. 64 bit got my my full 4gb in use finally.

        for the original poster, you have minimal worries. pretty much any new-ish system will be overkill for years to come for your plans. my only words of advice would be to go for no less than 8gb of ram. my other preference is also for small hard drives, particularly an ssd. use a 120gb ssd to build the system on, and keep your files on an external drive. better portability and less clutter for files you will write to the drive and often never open again. an ssd is hard to find unless you go all-out when you spec a computer with most builders though. i've always built mine so configuration was never an issue.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
          How about this one? Cheaper but looks to have near the same specs.

          http://www.dell.com/us/p/inspiron-66...=inspiron-660s

          Oh...Win 8 vs. 7.
          Bugger.
          8 can't be all THAT bad, is it?
          Once you get the desktop back everything is fine. Boots fast, or well, appears to. With the next update Win8 will default to the desktop, not that awful metro crap.

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          • #35
            I have one quick question, my Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit OEM package is here on my desk. My hard drive on the upgrade computer is partitioned into a large "C" drive and then two smaller ones.
            Question I know the OEM version I have will require a drive format so I am backing up all my important data off the "C" drive. BUT will it also wipe out my partitions and re-format them too?
            Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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            • #36
              Originally posted by lost_cause View Post
              can you post a link about this? i'm no doubting you, but i want to see where the breakoff point is now. i've built and maintained dozens of computers over the years, and there has never been a case (until now?) when a quality discrete card did not perform better than an integrated one. i did a little searching and the only thing i found about it was comparisons of an i7 with the intel 4000 vs. an nvidia 650m. the mobile nvidia chipsets have always been about the same performance as the previous desktop graphics, so i can see where an integrated i7 solution might be viable. the only difference being that the i7 is already $100 more than an i5, and my experience has been that the gamer will choose the i5 with discrete graphics - in this case that $100 will buy a gtx650, and if you catch a sale, a gtx650ti. i'm still skeptical of the i7 integrated vs. the i5 gtx650(ti) system. maybe i can learn something here - i will admit i am way out of date, as i haven't needed to build a new pc in ages. this is my current system:

              core2duo 3.0ghz, 4gb ddr2, (2) 8800gts 320mb. i just recently upgraded to windows7 64 from vista 32 (it ran flawlessly for years) because i finally snagged a matching video card for sli off ebay and it brought me down to 2.5gb of ram, which was way too low. 64 bit got my my full 4gb in use finally.

              for the original poster, you have minimal worries. pretty much any new-ish system will be overkill for years to come for your plans. my only words of advice would be to go for no less than 8gb of ram. my other preference is also for small hard drives, particularly an ssd. use a 120gb ssd to build the system on, and keep your files on an external drive. better portability and less clutter for files you will write to the drive and often never open again. an ssd is hard to find unless you go all-out when you spec a computer with most builders though. i've always built mine so configuration was never an issue.

              I dont have an answer, but I will take a crack at providing info. There are plenty of benchmark tests done by third parties. The 2 main problem with the question is that prices, especially video card prices, and what benchmark to use. Recently, due to bitcoin mining, prices on highend cards have actually gone up, but I dont think it will affect this discussion as these video cards start at about $400 and go up to at least double...

              I will edit the post with links or images of the benchmarks, then the current costs.

              Per this review by AnandTech, using a different CPU that the one QSIMDO asked about, but the same internal vidoe, HD 2500, here are some benchmarks.
              http://www.anandtech.com/show/5871/i...phics-tested/4


              Its hard to compare prices vs performance, as almost all of the cards on the list, especially the low end ones near the performance of the HD 2500 are no longer available. But in comparing the specs of those cards vs $100 cards of today, the $100 cards of today are clearly much much better.

              After doing all this looking up, I just now realize that the HD 2500 is quite old, but the listed benchmark also has the HD 4000 in it. Is it good enough for most users doing everyday stuff. Heck yes. Is it good enough for CAD, I have no clue, but suspect the HD 4000 is marginal.

              If it were my dollars, I would have no problem with the cheaper 3rd gen CPU with HD2500 and see how it goes. You can always add a video card.
              Last edited by cuemaker; 02-04-2014, 10:27 AM.

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              • #37
                I purchased one of those Inspiron 660s from Staples for $479.00. Yes it probably needs a better video card for 3D CAD, but everything else is running fine. Win8, upgrade to 8.1 is no problem. It is just another OS with a peculiar GUI. For the price I am happy. Maybe just dumb, but happy with this purchase.
                John Burchett
                in Byng OK

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                • #38
                  @ Lost-cause - Intel integrated graphics has made huge leaps. I have an early Sandy Bridge i7 with HD2000 graphics. It's rated at 20GFLOPS and does everything I need including Windows Aero. It also drives two displays in HD. By no means is it a "gamer" PC but it wasn't meant to be. It scores 6.2 on Windows Experience Index for Business and Graphics. That's what I need.

                  By comparison, the new Haswell i7s with HD5000+ are rated at over 830GFLOPS. I suspect the next generation will approach 1TFLOP.

                  And, it not just the cost of a video card as they all require additional power. You also have to include the cost of an improved power supply if you compare dollar for dollar.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by kc5ezc View Post
                    I purchased one of those Inspiron 660s from Staples for $479.00. Yes it probably needs a better video card for 3D CAD, but everything else is running fine. Win8, upgrade to 8.1 is no problem. It is just another OS with a peculiar GUI. For the price I am happy. Maybe just dumb, but happy with this purchase.
                    I think the Windows 8 GUI was designed by a third grade art class for the Mickey-D cashier generation. M$ is loosing cash hand over fist with W8 and the upcoming W9 won't be any better. There's so much negative talk between business over the new GUI that many will drop Windows and go to Unix. If MS wants any chance of survival they'll get out of the phone and tablet business and stick to what they're good at. The "Metro" GUI just plain sucks.

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                    • #40
                      Agreed, like XP, Windows 7 is a good OS, I compare Win 8 to Vista and Windows ME.
                      Last edited by wmgeorge; 02-04-2014, 01:57 PM.
                      Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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                      • #41
                        To the original question, maybe you need one of these to run the new OS...Dunno what it is, starts with an "X" IIRC, and has Solidworks on it, with Win7. Looks frankly like one of the over-done "gamer" computers.... as a "floortop" unit...

                        That's a large 3 ring binder sitting next to it in the first pic.



                        CNC machines only go through the motions

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