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Any of the Chinese Boring Heads good?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Yow Ling View Post
    ...metric a problem ?
    Oh dear. Would you also like to ask what is the best calibre for bear, while you're setting the 'Muricans off anyway?

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    • #32
      The hex socket on the set screws are what is soft, horrible things that start to strip out almost immediately, and ever notice also how shallow the socket is?
      They are poor quality for any application.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
        Mike, in the pic i see the block clamped in the vise, and bored. But i don't see it sitting on any paraelles.
        Did you bore this clamped without any support under? Just wondering.
        The parallels were in place for the heavy drilling, I may have slid them out for the final boring cuts.
        I don't have springs to keep them in place and when I tighten my vise the parallels go from a tight fit to a sliding fit.
        I'm sure you guys with Kurts don't have that problem.
        Mike

        My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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        • #34
          Ok, Thanks Mike, that's what i figured. Still, turned out real nice.

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          • #35
            The important thing with a boring head is to mount the cutting tool to the correct side because if you don't then as you adjust the cutter to advance the adjustment will reach the limit of it's
            engagement and parts will fly all over (with considerable force I might add).
            "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel"

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            • #36
              Originally posted by MotorradMike View Post
              -- when I tighten my vise the parallels go from a tight fit to a sliding fit.
              I'm sure you guys with Kurts don't have that problem.
              Invest a little money in to a dead blow plastic hammer,so you too can seat your parts and make even more accurate work. Tighten the vise a little, tap it down, tighten to full and whack it to seat on the parallels.
              Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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              • #37
                I guess I did not realize how well I did when I bought my mill and tooling and got a Bridgeport boring head. I recently bought a Chinese one for a project so I guess I need to try it out for it's intended use.

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                • #38
                  I have a 3" boring head purchased from ENCO that I think is a pretty good boring head. The imported boring heads are not bad but they are rather light duty. Heavy cuts or interrupted cuts could destroy these heads.

                  Below is a Bridgeport boring head. Notice the size of the gibs and the how the feed screw is made. It is well made.


                  Below is an Import boring head.


                  The import boring heads are ideal for the home machinist and for light work. If you buy a new boring head purchase one with the integral shank where the shank and head are one piece. This helps prevent tool chatter

                  When adjusting the boring head slide, tighten so the slide moves with a little drag. Just enough drag so the slide does not float. I don't tighten and loosen the slide between feed adjustments. Set the drag and leave it.

                  Jim
                  Last edited by outback; 02-05-2014, 01:52 AM.
                  So much to learn, so little time

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by MotorradMike View Post
                    I don't have springs to keep them in place and when I tighten my vise the parallels go from a tight fit to a sliding fit.
                    I'm sure you guys with Kurts don't have that problem.
                    While the Kurt anti jaw-lift system is nice to have, there is a standard technique to counter it on any vice.

                    If you place a round bar horizontally between the movable jaw and the work, then the bar can roll up the work a little as the jaw tightens (and lifts), whilst the work remains firmly planted on the fixed jaw. You do need to have a reasonable depth of work in the vice though.
                    Paul Compton
                    www.morini-mania.co.uk
                    http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                      Invest a little money in to a dead blow plastic hammer,so you too can seat your parts and make even more accurate work. Tighten the vise a little, tap it down, tighten to full and whack it to seat on the parallels.
                      Originally posted by EVguru View Post
                      While the Kurt anti jaw-lift system is nice to have, there is a standard technique to counter it on any vice.

                      If you place a round bar horizontally between the movable jaw and the work, then the bar can roll up the work a little as the jaw tightens (and lifts), whilst the work remains firmly planted on the fixed jaw. You do need to have a reasonable depth of work in the vice though.
                      I have the hammer and do that sometimes but I didn't know about the round bar trick, thanks.
                      Mike

                      My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                        Invest a little money in to a dead blow plastic hammer,so you too can seat your parts and make even more accurate work. Tighten the vise a little, tap it down, tighten to full and whack it to seat on the parallels.
                        Originally posted by EVguru View Post
                        While the Kurt anti jaw-lift system is nice to have, there is a standard technique to counter it on any vice.

                        If you place a round bar horizontally between the movable jaw and the work, then the bar can roll up the work a little as the jaw tightens (and lifts), whilst the work remains firmly planted on the fixed jaw. You do need to have a reasonable depth of work in the vice though.
                        I have the hammer and do that sometimes but I didn't know about the round bar trick, thanks.
                        Mike

                        My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          I purchased a used Criterion Boring Head DBL-202-- looks to be in good shape - Thanks for the help -

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