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  • #31
    Hi Michael
    ... and as much memory as they can get on board (32gb ) .
    You'll need to run a 64 kernel if you want to use all that RAM.
    Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Glug View Post
      Do it. It's easy, and it's free. The list of positives is long.

      Get yourself a nice ISO of XP that installs without a bunch of questions and no activation hassles. None of my virtual machines have general network access for security and consistency reasons, but of course I can share directories with my host OS and other virtual machines.
      This is what I was thinking of doing; I have not used windows since 1996, but recently I needed to do it for running the Qualcomm SOC debugger, and it runs only on Windows. So, I now have a windows box. It would not run in VMWare on my OSX desktop @work.

      @home if I do it, it's mainly for trying Cubify3D, and maybe some other programs, if I decide to purchase them (i.e., use them, not steal them!)

      BTW - have recently received a handful of the AMD APUs, including a just-released A10-7850K, and they look interesting.

      BTW2 - I *do* write lots of code that runs on the graphics co-processors, but that's work stuff, not workshop stuff!

      John.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by mike4 View Post
        and as much memory as they can get on board (32gb ) .
        32 Gigs might be a bit excessive 12 is more then enough, for most computers, unless you have something special in mind.
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
          Sure it can be made to work, but still you just can't trust the system in practically any way. It is like a boat with lots of leeaking holes: sure you can use it, just have enough buckets at hand.
          In the case of the Microsoft boat it leaks money.

          Regarding memory size, not all i7 cpus are alike. Check the bitness of the memory bus. Some are limited to 24G, others can use 32G. The Xeon chips in my servers can run 192G and I've built several production Oracle systems that were maxed out and ran blistering fast thanks to massive disk cache capability. My i7 960 (4 core) Redhat Linux server (home built) is limited to 24G and has 16 in it now, most of which is used for disk cache as it has only a web server, MySQL, and Squid proxy software on it and is used only by the intranet and production backups.

          My Dell servers have 2 each Xeon L5520 cpus which are way overkill, and with no keyboards/monitors attached, the vid perf is not a factor. One of the Dell servers replaced a Sun Netra X1 that I bought new in 2001 and which ran non-stop until last year doing the same job as the Dell but with 1 450mHz CPU and 4G of RAM. The other Dell replaced an equally old Sun Netra T105 that has 2G ram and 500mHz cpu. That one I'm migrating to another location and will run it again for another few years.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by loose nut View Post
            32 Gigs might be a bit excessive 12 is more then enough, for most computers, unless you have something special in mind.
            Sizing memory isn't rocket science but it is a bit more complicated than that. Disk speed and RAID (if used) come into play, concurrent critical processes also, and disk reads and writes/sec are examined. If you see a lot of paging (not swap), large reads (a huge inbox, for example), or work with video and audio, then you can speed things up with $150 worth of RAM. Consumer disks that run at 10K and above are not common - typical is 7.5K (RPM). Add a simple mirror disk and you clobber IO and see poor IOWait numbers. Caching cures that to a large degree. All modern computers use every byte of memory for something, and giving a lot of memory to caching pays off. Keeping your inbox small helps, too. Some people will have 10G of junk in the Inbox, and on Unix systems that means mbox which is a single large file. 5 or 6 users with that kind of inbox is not uncommon and it results in paging of cache for what I consider low-criticality use vs holding Wordpress database tables.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
              Any company with decent security doesn't use Microsoft products,
              To use Jon herons favorite expression that "Bull $#!+"
              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                but the FreeCAD works and produces exactly what is needed - solid models, drawings, renderings etc. May I suggest you try it out first?
                I have used many free cad programs and as I stated on a earlier thread they will work but if you really have used the high end cad programs (Inventor or Solidworks) then you would know what gizmo's are missing.
                The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                  I have used many free cad programs and as I stated on a earlier thread they will work but if you really have used the high end cad programs (Inventor or Solidworks) then you would know what gizmo's are missing.
                  Haven't used all the bell's and whistles in a SolidWorks, so can't say for sure what is missing from an average user. Could you point out some of these features?
                  Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                    To use Jon herons favorite expression that "Bull $#!+"
                    True, that. There's some good news out of our neighboring city Redmond - legendary pit bull Steve Balmer is out at Microsoft as CEO. That can't be a bad thing.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                      Haven't used all the bell's and whistles in a SolidWorks, so can't say for sure what is missing from an average user. Could you point out some of these features?
                      I will give it my best shot.

                      I personally don't like Solidworks that much, the interface doesn't appeal to me but that is just a my choice. I have more time using Inventor which in my opinion has a better interface, others will disagree.

                      Most of these programs, Freecad included, have the same or similar drawing engines, the core program that does the work, so they function in a similar matter. What the high end programs bring to the table is the extras.

                      Inventor and I am assuming Solidwork, and other higher end programs, are similar, has built in functions that most of us don't need like FEA and other analytical functions but it has a engineering section that will do most of the calculations for you. Again not much use to most of us but a real time saver for those that do.

                      The part that I like the best is the ability to generate parts on demand. You need a bearing (ball, roller whatever), nut, bolt, washer, sprocket, gear, chain or any of tens of thousands of other components for what ever you are designing, you just tell it what you want (that is a simplified statement it is more involved) and it generates a part, drops it into your assembly (with full spec data). All you have to do is position it. It is possible to do this with programs that don't have this functionality by downloading parts from third party suppliers and manufacturers. Any manufacturer that wants to stay in business these days offers these for free, hoping you will buy their components but it takes time and by the time you find what you want and download it you are long time finished with it in Inventor. Other more advanced functions are they ability to do tubing and run electrical cable in assemblies, put "weld" into parts and fro people that do sheet metal work (I do) it will take a part that you make and "unfold" it into a flat template. On top of that there is the motion generating functions that are nice, gives the ability to fit parts that have to move together. Many programs include these functions or at least some of them not just Inventor, I honestly don't know how much is included in Freecad.

                      Another feature I like is the ability to generate drawings rapidly. You can do a set of drawings minus dimensions in about 30 sec. I don't know how long it takes with Freecad but having used Autocad in the past, which had a major failing in the way drawings are setup (a holdover from the early days I would imagine), it is a pleasure to do it in Inventor. I haven't used Autocad for years so I can't say if it has been "modernized" or not.

                      I have Freecad on my computer but I haven't really gotten into it very far, it has a completely different type of interface and I haven't taken the time to learn it, time problem. I wasn't trying to put it down, I think it is a great program especially for freeware (I have tried many of them, Freecad seems to be the best by far) and it can be had in Windows or Linux so that might be what the OP wants. It will do most of the functions that a hobbyist will want. 3D cad isn't for everyone, those using it for 2 or 2 1/2D CNC would probably need a 2D cad program??? I don't CNC so I can say for sure.

                      Hope that helps

                      P.S. I will admit to being biased in favor of Inventor, that doesn't mean other programs aren't as good.
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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