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100 ton die press on the cheap

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  • 100 ton die press on the cheap

    Hi, I'm new here. So as an introduction here's the portable press that I recently scabbed together.
    I tested it at 20 tons punching an Allen Key hex thru 8mm steel plate. Works like a charm.
    *this is incredibly dangerous!*
    Last edited by superUnknown; 02-04-2014, 05:55 PM.

  • #2
    That was entertaining to warch, thank you! And the end result was nice, though I would have probably added 10 dollars worth of thrust bearings there also
    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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    • #3
      Hahaha, very observant of you. The coupling nuts are already chewing up the washers...

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      • #4
        Well done superunknown, that was quite a tough task tapping the holes
        Alan

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jackary View Post
          Well done superunknown, that was quite a tough task tapping the holes
          Alan
          That was a nasty bit of bull-work, to be sure! I only had a Yamawa bottoming tap, decided to "run what'cha brung". Didn't want to hand grind it into backwoods taper...

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          • #6
            I think a double washer would make a good makeshift thrust washer. I would use two grade 8 washers and lube between them and under the lower washer. Leave the junction of the top washer and the nut unlubricated so they do not rub. Stone the faces of the washers to remove any burrs before installing them.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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            • #7
              i think you are in market for four servo motors.

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              • #8
                Great vid.... Entertainin!!!! JR

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                • #9
                  Good video and commentary. Why coarse and not fine thread though?
                  "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel"

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                  • #10
                    Couldn't find the 1" fine thread tap. Came across it today in the wrong cigar box...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dian View Post
                      i think you are in market for four servo motors.
                      Or four sprockets and a length of chain
                      Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                        Or four sprockets and a length of chain
                        this is strictly Armstrong power since it needs 600-700 lbs feet torque on all for screws to develop 100 tons. Ran it up to 30 - 40 tons today punching 1/2" steel plate.

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                        • #13
                          Using a socket for a pusher in a press is BAD idea. One of my friends was pressing using a socket and it shattered and cracked his skull! Must have been too hard.

                          Or can mild steel shatter too?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mikem View Post
                            Using a socket for a pusher in a press is BAD idea. One of my friends was pressing using a socket and it shattered and cracked his skull! Must have been too hard.
                            Thanks for the word of caution. Was he pressing the socket with his head? I stay out of the line of fire and ALWAYS take a few minutes to run through the worst case (what's gonna kill/hurt me?) before doing anything stupid/ill advised. There's nothing to say a $1000 punch die isn't going to shatter...

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                            • #15
                              Depends on the temperature, will shatter nicely at low temp, fracture really well around zero as our Canadian freinds no doubt will attest, winter is hard on machinery, you have to get the steel right for the cold
                              The strength of the stud bar when cold is also diminished a lot, particularly when the effective diameter of the thread lowers the amount of contact, the thread will only be partially in contact and the tops of the thread that touch the tops of the thread in the hole shear off quite nicely, if seen stripping leave a triangular helix in the hole that you have to screw out with a pliers like a little helicoil.
                              Most of the high load thread forms are butress or square form or acme to provide a bit more meat in the thread to stand the load.
                              As Jako said, 4 sprockets and a chain is a common method of macking a 3 or 4 ( or more) post screw press, all the threads are then synchronised as they advance, not wiithout the inclusion of roller thrust races as suggested earlier, under (and over) the sprockets, which have an internal thread, running them dry is also a bad idea as you can develop enough pressure to actually weld the thread together, which then rips the flanks off as the torque is applied, destroying the thread in a very short time. Lubrication with black moly grease seems to be the norm for high loads. It punched a hell of a hole with the allen key punch, i wouldent think it would be able to repeat that kind of loading repeatedly.
                              Mark

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