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  • Steam whistle plans needed.

    I would like to build a medium size steam/air whistle and am looking for some plans. I checked the archives but couldn't find much. Three or four tubes should just about do it. Thanks, JL
    James Lea

  • #2
    As I recall, one of Guy Lautard's Machinist's Bedside Reader books (#1or #2) has plans for a steam whistle.
    Maybe someone else will confirm or refute that.
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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    • #3
      lynnl is right.
      I don't remember which one either.

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      • #4
        Try Vol.II Page 134. A Replica Lunkenheimer Steam Whistle.
        Kansas City area

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        • #5
          Here's a very simple one: http://www.trainweb.org/riverview/whistle.html

          If you're a member there's several links on this page: http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/lo...-plans-111493/

          Seems anti-productive to hide the images from non-members but a lot of sites do that.
          Last edited by dp; 02-04-2014, 03:33 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
            Try Vol.II Page 134. A Replica Lunkenheimer Steam Whistle.
            About 20 years ago I made one off (sorta, I took the basic plans and changed them to suit the stock I had handy at the moment) those plans. With 90 psi air pressure I can kill dogs at 100 paces. Even blowing it with mouth pressure makes a lot of noise!

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            • #7
              These folks have all the answers.
              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...tions/messages
              There is also a great deal of engineering on low pressure, high volume, high efficiency whistles available.
              My friend lives a couple of blocks from the freeway and is a little over two miles away from me. He can hear my whistle from inside his house. This whistle is a three-bell chime that mimics a C&O whistle and fully blows at < 20 PSI.
              Adopting Richards low pressure-high volume engineering will NOT diminish performance and will allow you to fully utilize the air that you have stored. I used this technology to make an exhaust whistle for my diesel tractor that can be heard all over the heights. It also gives you the option to use non-traditional materials such as ABS or PVC.
              We are not talking kids toys here. These whistles produce sound pressure levels that are felt in your chest and can easily damage your hearing.
              Have fun with it, Mike

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