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Solenoid Valve Selection

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  • Solenoid Valve Selection

    I have no experience with things electronic. I am trying to mate a controller with a solenoid operated valve and so far my research has not given me a clear answer.

    The Controller: http://www.uswatersystems.com/commer...ontroller.html

    The Valve: http://www.mcmaster.com/#three-way-s...valves/=qkbedw ( stainless steel type 430)

    The controller data says this: “Relay Voltage: 5V (simple switch)”. The controller runs on 120v.

    I need a 3-way valve suitable for conducting pure water @65° and 50 psi through a re-mineralization loop until the “Total Dissolved Solids” reach a preset level at which the loop will be bypassed. When I search for valves I do not know how to tell if they will work with the controller.

  • #2
    What you will need is a solid state relay rated for the valve coil voltage that operates the valve. For the examples cited I'd use a valve with a 120vac coil to keep things simple. An SSR something like http://www.opto22.com/site/pr_detail...=4&item=120a10 will work.

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    • #3
      ok - so how do I hook it up? I see the relay has 4 terminals I suppose two go to the controller and two go to the valve, does it matter which is which? What does the relay do? What would happen if I just wired the controller to the valve?.

      Can anyone point me to an explanation of how these systems work? Thanks

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      • #4
        The example SSR I cited has marked positive and negative control lugs. Those go to your controller. The load side would get the black wire of the 120vac supply, the other lug would go to one leg of the solenoid valve, and the other leg of the solenoid to the white wire of the 1120vac supply.

        The SSR acts as switch, turned on and off by the controller's output lead. You could use a SPST/NO relay with a 5vdc coil if the controller's output lead can supply enough current. The SSR only needs something like 30ma or so.

        Since the controller's output is a 5vdc signal, probably of limited current capacity, nothing would happen if you hooked it to a valve not designed for a 5vdc control signal. Well, it could burn up the output stage of the controller. Such valves exist, but I don't know of one in the size and flow capability you need.

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        • #5
          Is the 120vac power supply just a cord plugged into a wall receptacle (house current)?

          I see no mention of the controllers output being dc. Does it matter if it ac or dc?

          The SSR you linked to shows no + or -. I assume (based on the picture of the SSR in the link) the controller is attached to the terminals #3 & #4.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Horst View Post
            Is the 120vac power supply just a cord plugged into a wall receptacle (house current)?

            I see no mention of the controllers output being dc. Does it matter if it ac or dc?

            The SSR you linked to shows no + or -. I assume (based on the picture of the SSR in the link) the controller is attached to the terminals #3 & #4.
            While the data lists the contact as
            • Relay Control: The unit will open or close a circuit via dry contacts when the ppm level (out line/line 2 only)reaches or exceeds the control setting (simple switch). It can be used to control a pump, solenoid valve or other device. (In line/Line 1 does not have a control function)
            • Relay Voltage: 5V (simple switch)



            http://www.uswatersystems.com/pdf/Wi...oid-Valves.pdf

            shows the relay contact wired to the 110V main supply, and in their example they are using a 110v relay to drive the solenoid valve that is equipped with a 110V coil.

            The solenoid sounds like it should be stainless steel to limit the absorption of metallic elements into your water. Could be plastic, all that depends on the water and your requirements. Brass would likely be the most available and the least expensive.

            I don't know how fast control valve needs to react, that would be based on the volume of water you are treating and the GPM. A motorized ball valve is another possibility if you need a higher flow rate, (GPM). Solenoids can be crappy at high flows, and also may have low pressure operation problems if the valve is pilot operated.

            paul
            paul
            ARS W9PCS

            Esto Vigilans

            Remember, just because you can doesn't mean you should...
            but you may have to

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