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Do you sometimes learn things years after you should have?

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  • Do you sometimes learn things years after you should have?

    I recently read something about a strip to locate your mill vise with the T slots. Hmmmmn.....since I had my vise off, I looked on the bottom and found a slot in both directions. I made a locating strip which was a pain because the vise slot was .070 wider then the T slots.

    There were tapped holes in the vise which turned out to be metric. No problem, drilled and tapped for 5/16. Bolted the strip in and dropped the vise into a T slot. Didn't even use any T nuts yet.

    I put an indicator in the spindle and cranked the table. Results.....less then .0005 over 5 ". If you can do this with your vise, it will save you some time when you want to remount it.

  • #2
    If you make the table keys a bit wider and you first bolt a block of steel to the mill table and mill it true,then flip the vise over clamp it to the block and mill the table keys to a slight press fit you can get rid of that .0005 runout.

    Don't worry there's plenty of things I never knew before,I never suspected that a hobby would turn into 60 hours a week
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    • #3
      Mike and Wierd,

      I knew both about the slots/keys thing and about milling your own by clamping the vise upside down but had forgotten about both. I had made a simple square from scrap aluminum angle that fits in the slot under the vise and lays against the vise's side for alignment. It's adjustable and works fairly well for three of my vises, one of which I had to mill a flat on the side for it.

      Thanks for the reminders. I think I may have to try the key idea sometime soon as it sounds simpler.

      Paul A.


      [This message has been edited by Paul Alciatore (edited 05-03-2004).]
      Paul A.

      Make it fit.
      You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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      • #4
        I just checked my cheap vices, and no slots or locating strips, or holes, so I'll continue to use my specially made square to line things up. But on the topic of how long did I wait to change something on a machine for the better- I finally trashed the sloppy holdown bolt from the tailstock, replacing it with a larger diameter, and milling the seat area for the nut. Made a threaded hole in a piece of flat bar, that's the clamp now. What a difference- now it clamps tight with just a few tens of degrees turn, and when loosened, it doesn't 'grab' when I move the tailstock on the ways. I put up with that PITA for nearly ten years.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by darryl:
          I just checked my cheap vices, and no slots or locating strips, or holes, so I'll continue to use my specially made square to line things up. </font>
          Why not put in your own? I have done so for several fixtures of various types. Saves a lot of time.

          The only disadvantage is if you ever want the vice "perfectly" parallel. Inevitably you will then discover that what tiny amount of play exists won't let you quite "tunk" it in parallel........because your original error off parallel is just slightly larger than the "play".
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            Well, I could put my own locating system on the vices, probably a good idea. I'll have to look and see where there's enough metal so I don't weaken the vices. They are already thin in spots where factory holes are placed. I'm going down to the shop at this moment to see what's possible. Ok, I'm back. It seems like a good way for me to do it is to not weaken the bases any more, but instead make some close-fitting t nuts for the mill table slots, tapped for the vice hold-down bolts. They would both have a stub that raises above table height, and would fit into a rounded hole milled between the toes of the vice feet. One of these stubs would be an eccentric insert, allowing for adjustment. The hold down bolts go right through the center of them into the t nuts. Looking at the vices again, I realize that one of them can only be mounted lengthwise, as otherwise only one mounting foot can be used. The other vice can only be mounted crosswise, as the feet spacing doesn't match the t slot spacing. Either way, I could align each vice just by using these special t nuts, and do a precision adjustment on each one just once, using the eccentric. What comes to mind now is for me to carefully check the length of each t slot to see if they are consistent in width and parallel.
            See what I've learned just from reading this topic! I should have done something about this long ago.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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