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  • Drill mill

    I floated this idea before here. I've been working on my Strands drill press and it is cleaning up very nicely. I would like to try and use it as a light duty milling machine. I need an X-Y table, either build or buy. The main problem is how to hold the cutters. The DP has a MT3 spindle with no through hole to use a drawbar. What I have in mind is to make a MT3 to MT3 adapter. I know, sounds stupid. But, the adapter would have a short drawbar itself to pull in a collett with cutter, then the entire unit would be placed in the spindle. Think it would work? The DP has huge spindle bearings and is extremely rigid. I would replace the downfeed dial with a precision dial and it is trivial to make a quill lock for it.

    Any idea where I can buy a X-Y table?



    [This message has been edited by Evan (edited 05-03-2004).]
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  • #2
    double post

    [This message has been edited by Evan (edited 05-03-2004).]
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    • #3
      If part of the spindle with the taper sticks out beyond the bearings you could drill and tap a hole for a set screw. Then grind flats on regular #3 end mill holders. From the picture it doesn't look like yours is that way. There must be some exposed area farther up where the removal key is inserted to knock things out, maybe a holding method up there?

      I tapped the spindle on my older 17" Delta DP to hold the #2 taper of a reversing tapping head from pulling out on reversal.

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      • #4
        Evan,

        To my way of thinking, not only does the draw bar clamp the mill cutter it also holds the the whole thing together for rigidity.

        But....following what you suggest - could you mill a slot in the side of the quill and another in the MT 3 that fits in the drill? This way perhaps you could put in a wedge to tighten. The wedge would be threaded so it could be clamped tight - kind of a "side drawbar".



        [This message has been edited by Mike Burdick (edited 05-03-2004).]

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        • #5
          Evan,

          If you don't mind buying import stuff, Grizzly sells some stand alone xy tables that would probably bolt to the table. As far as your holder idea, I am told that the MT was not intended to take lateral forces very well. I am afraid that you would have trouble with the sleeve dropping out of the spindle. Is there any way that you can remove the spindle from the DP, and bore it to accept a draw bar? If i remember correctly, a drawbar for MT is only 3/8-16.
          Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

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          • #6
            There is no way to make a through hole in the spindle since it is a gearhead press and the transmission is part of the spindle.

            There is a slim possibility of retaining the MT3 adapter since it does have a through slot in the side of the spindle for removal of tapers. I might be able to come up with some way to make use of that, I'll have to think on it.
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            • #7
              I think all of the tool places sell X-Y tables. Grizzly, Enco, KBC, Victor, etc. (HF intentionally lefo out). Also Palgrem has one that may be US made and is only a little (50%) more expensive.

              I don't know anything about your spindle so I won't comment there except to say that I would try to devise some positive type of lock as any taper by itself is almost sure to come out under the vibration of any but the lightest cuts. Perhaps there's enough of the spindle sticking out or enough face exposed to get some kind of attachment on it to hold the MT3s in place. Or perhaps you could bore the spindle out for a drawbar?

              Paul A.
              Paul A.

              Make it fit.
              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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              • #8
                I tried to spotface a small round part in my drill press with a endmilll. The first thing I noticied was that the table wanted to move. Even if you solve the spindle problem, I think you will have problems with the table and the x/y table not being rigid enough.

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                • #9
                  perhaps you can get threaded hole up into the inside of the spindle from the bottom with wich you can use a socket head screw to suck in a mt3 endmill holder.

                  A counterbored through hole in the holder, and threaded blind hole in spindle. and a screw who's head diameter is a bit smaller than whatever endmill size.

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                  • #10
                    You can buy MT #3 mill holders from Enco. These are friction fit of course, but I use them on my lathe with a MT #3 spindle. The only problem is getting them out without a through hole. You might need some kind of puller to remove them.

                    Nice drill press.

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                    • #11
                      I don't think the table moving will be a problem. It has a very positive locking mechanism to the column.

                      I looked up X-Y tables at KBC. YIKES!! I might just as well buy a new milling machine, they only cost a few dollars more than a table of the same size. A 10" X 6" table starts at $590 CAD. They do have an 18" X 6" by Palmgren for $415 but it's metric and all the rest of my stuff is inch.
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                      • #12
                        Evan, am I right to assume that they expected the MT3 taper to stay put without help of a drawbar or any other type of clamping? Seems odd to me, but then as a drill press only, maybe that is a legitimate expectation. As DR says, if there's accessible metal to use a setscrew then maybe use three evenly spaced around the spindle. You could make a groove in the inserted MT3 collet where the setscrews would come into, and arrange to have the screws bear on the upper edge of this groove. Same idea your Unimat uses to hold it's parts together. In the case of your drill press, those setscrews would be give both an upward and inward force where they bear on the collet, forcing the collet upwards into the spindle and simultaneously forcing the sides of the collet to grip the cutter. If there isn't room on the spindle to have the setscrews, you could make up a washer to fit the collet end, where some upward force would tend to close the collet. Possibly drill upwards into the spindle in three spots, tap those holes, and be able to tighten the washer upwards with some strong bolts. You may have to have an access to knock the collet downwards to release the cutter, but with the washer in place, it wouldn't fall out, just the cutter would. If you can do it this way, you won't have to accept a lengthened collet holder with it's compromised rigidity. Just some ideas.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          Evan,
                          Can you post a photo of the bottom of the spindle?
                          To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

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                          • #14
                            Darryl,

                            Some good ideas. I probably can find room for two setscrews in the spindle where the slot is to access the tang to remove the tools. However, I expect the spindle is hardened so it might pose a problem trying to drill and tap it. I think the idea of retaining it from the nose might just work. I'll have to take it apart and see how much room there is for holes. The good part is that the entire nose rotates. I bet if I use a sleeve, MT3 to MT3 to hold the collets I could come up with some sort of screw on collar that would force the collet into the sleeve and the sleeve in turn into the quill taper bore. That would definitely hold it securely. It's starting to sound doable.

                            George,

                            Yep, I'll take some tonight.



                            [This message has been edited by Evan (edited 05-03-2004).]
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                            • #15
                              I'd suspect that it's hardened, but probably not through hardened. be easy to try drilling straight up. put a stationary drill bit in a vise and plunge! no harm in trying.

                              if you made a nifty screw with a collar it could also act as a jack screw to help you remove the adapter.

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