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Sanford SG-48 surface grinder survey

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  • #16
    Originally posted by AlO View Post
    Hi Dennis and Everyone,

    I just joined and am posting for two reasons. I recently bought a small bench top Sanford Surface Grinder, model SG 48, and will be forwarding the info requested to Dennis. I believe this is the smallest model Sanford made at the time. My grinder came without a motor or bracket for mounting the motor. Would any of you have a sense of how the motor should mount. From the literature I downloaded it seems the motor mounted somehow on the back of the machine, but there are no photos that I could find, and therefore I'm unclear as to exactly where the bolt holes are for mounting. Any help from someone with a Sanford would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Al

    Welcome aboard, Al! If you could update your personal information we can tell where you are located. Send me a private message with your email address and I can send you some photos of motor mounts. Basically it mounted to the rear of the carriage that holds the spindle. I would post photos here but have not been successful doing so.

    If you bought the Sanford sold on eBay last week, you are in for a lot of work, it was basically a parts machine. It was lacking the motor mount, and the original spindle was replaced with a real long Dumore spindle, requiring the motor to stick completely behind the machine instead of pointing into the elevation housing. Dennis

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    • #17
      Al,

      Here is a link to a great photo of the motor mount on another forum:

      http://www.hobby-machinist.com/showthread.php?t=20195

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      • #18
        This is the info for the one that I have access to. The numerals of the Serial Number are stamped.

        SANFORD MFG. CO.
        1020 - 28 COMMERCE AVE.
        UNION, N.J.
        U.S.A.
        SERIAL NO. SG
        46 1014

        The motor tag:
        Made Expressly for
        SANFORD Mfg. Co.
        Irvington, NJ


        Volts 115 Cyl 60 PH 1
        HP 1/6 Amps 2.5 RPM 3450
        From AOS Time Rating 40 *C Continous
        FR KS125 SER MM13888 WE

        Robbin & Myers Corp.

        Other info.:
        It has an oil resavoir ( glass with adjustable drip) on the spindle.
        The screw for Z axis has a cover.
        Gears are covered.
        Arrows for the dials.
        .0005 Graduations for Z axis.
        .001 Graduations for Y axis.

        Threaded hole on left side of guard.

        Vacuum Tube chuck

        Flat Belt

        edit: oiler info.
        Last edited by 90LX_Notch; 03-29-2014, 03:06 PM.

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        • #19
          http://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul...logs_i-m.shtml

          Have you contacted the librarians at Rutgers to see what they have related to Sanford Manufacturing with an Irvington address?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by 90LX_Notch View Post
            This is the info for the one that I have access to. The numerals of the Serial Number are stamped.

            SANFORD MFG. CO.
            1020 - 28 COMMERCE AVE.
            UNION, N.J.
            U.S.A.
            SERIAL NO. SG
            46 1014

            Thanks, 90LX_Notch, excellent! That is a very early unit, the lowest serial number I have seen and a nice data point. You said the number is stamped, where is it stamped? Is there a metal tag?

            Got any photos? If I can get a photo of the motor mount I can pin down the earliest style. Is the vacuum tube power supply working? Have you ever measured the output voltage? I would really like to get better photos of one and identify the tube also. It seems to be a very simple circuit, a rectifier circuit and transformer, but I don't know if the transformer supplies high voltage to the chuck, or just to run the tube. I have heard that the old chucks ran at 300-400 volts but have no confirmation.

            Dennis

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
              http://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul...logs_i-m.shtml

              Have you contacted the librarians at Rutgers to see what they have related to Sanford Manufacturing with an Irvington address?
              I hadn't tried any universities yet, I forwarded a request to them to see if I can get a copy of the ad from Irvington. Is that the only listing they have for Sanford, I can't get that trade catalog listing to work for me, it says I need to be a student... Dennis

              Edit: Never mind, I got it working.

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              • #22
                I have had an interesting find. I found that Sanford Manufacturing was formerly known as F.C. Sanford Manufacturing of Bridgeport Conn. And further, Francis C Sanford patented grinders assigned to the Cincinnati Milling Machine Co, although they all seem to be centerless grinders. His patents are from the 1920s. Dennis

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                • #23
                  Don't know any more about the Sandford grinders other than the fact that I want one, or one like them.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by mixdenny View Post
                    Thanks, 90LX_Notch, excellent! That is a very early unit, the lowest serial number I have seen and a nice data point. You said the number is stamped, where is it stamped? Is there a metal tag?

                    Got any photos? If I can get a photo of the motor mount I can pin down the earliest style. Is the vacuum tube power supply working? Have you ever measured the output voltage? I would really like to get better photos of one and identify the tube also. It seems to be a very simple circuit, a rectifier circuit and transformer, but I don't know if the transformer supplies high voltage to the chuck, or just to run the tube. I have heard that the old chucks ran at 300-400 volts but have no confirmation.

                    Dennis

                    Dennis-

                    It's old. The motor, as well as the tag on the motor, are very "old school" looking.

                    The plate on grinder base is rivetted to the casting under the Y axis dial. 46 1014 is stamped, everything else is painted on the plate.

                    I'll see if I can get some photos.

                    The power supply is working.

                    I don't know the output voltage.

                    It will be very hard to get a picture of the power supply. It's mounted inside the base casting and comes out from the bottom. In order to do this, the grinder will have to be unbolted from the bench and tipped back.

                    -Bob

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                    • #25
                      Bump to keep this survey active.

                      UPDATE: The Smithsonian scanned PDFs of several Sanford catalogs going back to 1953, when the SG model only cost $925! I am working on getting copies of the 1951 and 1945 catalogs from the OCLC WorldCat.

                      I have located the family, perhaps not the ex-owner of Sanford Manufacturing, but no responses from them yet.

                      Dennis

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                      • #26
                        Please keep us updated. I find this type of stuff interesting. Hopefully I'll get some pictures of the grinder within the next couple of days.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by mixdenny View Post
                          Bump to keep this survey active.

                          UPDATE: The Smithsonian scanned PDFs of several Sanford catalogs going back to 1953, when the SG model only cost $925! I am working on getting copies of the 1951 and 1945 catalogs from the OCLC WorldCat.

                          I have located the family, perhaps not the ex-owner of Sanford Manufacturing, but no responses from them yet.

                          Dennis
                          Any word from what may be the kin of Sanford? Any new locations for the company? Any other history come to light?

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