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  • Excited to use generator continued.

    For some reason my posts won't show up in the other thread. It seems stuck at 20 posts and won't allow more.





    My reply didn't go threw last night.

    It was a fun day! Good to know my little genny can run the fridge, heater, and some lights if ever really needed. The power was only off for a few hours yesterday but I expected much longer.

    I did shut off the main breaker first and made sure my house was isolated to itself. There is now way my little genny would be able to backfeed the system unless the break was right outside of my house in which case I would know about it. Just having my coffee maker plugged in was enough to trip its breaker/overload protection. Yes I also made sure I had the leads right so I wasn't powering the ground side. I would think the genny breaker would trip if you tried to power the ground side of a service panel?

    I also DID have the generator in the garage but in the down wind doorway with the exhaust facing out and a up wind door open for flow threw the garage. If the outage was going to last any decent amount of time I would have moved the genny out away from the house.

    Probably one of my best purchases ever! The genny is only 45 pounds and works great for power tools out in the field or lighting or what have you. We use it primarily for charging the camper batteries while on long stays.

    Andy

  • #2
    Make sure it can't be recognised if you venture near bigger city's.
    High brake-in and steal item.
    Glad it works out well.

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    • #3
      I've seen an electrical panel cover with a simple lock out for generator use. The breaker that backfeeds the panel from the generator is in the space closest to the main and there is a sliding flat metal piece in a track that will either block the main breaker or the generator breaker so they both can't be on at the same time.

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      • #4
        got that same genny -- thrilled the last time power was out, as it was more than enough to run the gas boiler. even ran the coffee maker ! outages aren't real frequent around here, but we have had a few occasions that it is out a couple of days,and of course the weather is cold. don't mind using flashlights,but heat is nice !!!
        bmw

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        • #5
          For only a few circuits, a manual transfer switch is not expensive or typically difficult to install. That makes the use of the generator in a power outage much safer.

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          • #6
            You should have the proper breaker installed it is the law and you put the utility workers at risk. The proper breaker has a break before make feature main breakers fail all the time and relying on that breaker is a bad idea. I am a lineman and I know of at least one lineman who did not go home ever due to a customer installed generator. They had a wire down so that transformer was not connected to the rest of the system he paid the price did he follow all the safety rules no but that is how accidents happen try working for several days with no sleep and things happen. Hell it could be your neighbors kid that grabs that downed wire your generator is backfeeding. I could tell many stories about customers who move downed wires tie plastic bags to them so we see them. Fireman arrive first to wires down and you would be surprised how many times they contact down wires. You need a physical disconnect not a main breaker. I could not tell you how many main breakers I have seen failed. Read about fatal accidents there is usually a whole chain of events that lead to these things.

            I have tried to respond to this thread before and my response did not post. Do the right thing just plug the stuff you need to the generator if you can't afford the proper equipment.

            Mike

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            • #7
              I agree with Mike 500%. Run extension cords from your generator to appliances if you won't install the correct interlock.

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              • #8
                I know the government makes laws to protect good people from idiots.
                That I understand. Do not utility workers test lines before working on
                them? Or perhaps some Joe turned on a genny while a lineman was
                working on them? I know they do ground them out for protection also.

                -Doozer
                DZER

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                • #9
                  Test lines before, sure, but what happens if someone hooks one up after they have started work?

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                  • #10
                    A cheap, dirty, and 100% safe "transfer switch" for something like your furnace is to disconnect the hardwired connection and replace it with a short pigtail w/3-prong plug and a receptacle. Unplug it from "house power" and plug it into an extension cord. Use a couple more extension cords for the fridge, TV, and lights.

                    Also, you should not ever run a genset in a garage or other building unless the exhaust is piped outside. Many more folks die every year from CO poisoning than electrocution from gensets, keep them far from the house and any windows. Chain it to a tree if theft is a concern.

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                    • #11
                      JMHO but the most overlooked danger with backfeeding is overloading the single circuit that carries power back to the panel, especially when using a larger generator. When my father still sold generators we knew several folks who burned their own houses with that foolishness.
                      "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                        Do not utility workers test lines before working on
                        them?
                        It depends on the job they are doing. Working on a transformer or substation? Likely yes. Repairing a household connection after a storm? Hardly ever, theyre likely to have dozens of similar repairs needing to be made in a few hours and working on a hot line isnt anything new or uncommon.
                        Last edited by justanengineer; 04-16-2014, 09:16 AM.
                        "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hey I can reply to my thread!

                          I tried posting more than a few times yesterday and even made a new thread which also didn't show up.

                          It was fun times the other day. The power only stayed off for a few hours so no long term fun for me.

                          When I hooked up the genny I did make sure the main was off and I did have the leads right so I wasn't making the ground side hot. I did find out that with the fridge and furnace running the genny didn't have enough umph to power the coffee maker (bunn). Unless the break was on my pole, which I would like to think I would know about, there wouldn't be much chance of me backfeeding the system with my little eu2000.

                          I also did have the genny in the garage but right in the down wind doorway with the exhaust facing outwards obviously and I had an up wind door open to flow threw the garage and out past the genny. If the outage would have turned into a long event I would have moved the genny out away from the house.

                          I absolutely love this little thing! It works a treat for power tools out in the field and has good power for its size. Super quiet, starts every time, nice and portable, whats not to love.

                          Andy

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                          • #14
                            Those little Hondas are a great little unit.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
                              JMHO but the most overlooked danger with backfeeding is overloading the single circuit that carries power back to the panel, especially when using a larger generator. When my father still sold generators we knew several folks who burned their own houses with that foolishness.


                              That does make me curious, will a breaker still trip if there is a fault and it is being fed power the opposite way?
                              Andy

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