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How do I keep the aluminum parts from corrosion ?

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  • How do I keep the aluminum parts from corrosion ?

    Here on the Oregon coast we have a big problem with the aluminum parts like the alternator on cars corroding really bad. All the aluminum parts get a chalky white, pitted surface on them. I know some of you must have the same problem. Would a simple coat of auto wax detour this ? I am planning on buying a new car tomorrow and would like to protect it from the get-go.
    Thanks
    Mel
    _____________________________________________

    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
    Oregon Coast

  • #2
    I was told long term storage of ally is well served with a liberal dose of vaseline, or white litium grease . I have never tried it so maybe better check with others first.Have fun brother. Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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    • #3
      I wouldn't put grease on it. All that will do is hold dirt. The alternators aren't anodized so they corrode pretty fast. You could remove it and clear coat it. That would last a while and still retain the original look. Since it's not exposed to the sun, you could use a clear engine paint in a rattle can.

      Depending on the make, you would do yourself a real favor by painting under carriage components too. Some MFGs leave them bare metal.
      Last edited by CCWKen; 04-20-2014, 04:21 PM.

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      • #4
        Spray it with corrosion inhibitor, basically a tacky wax. Keeps the oxygen, salt and water off the metal's surface.

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        • #5
          I have had good luck with Fluid Film. Designed to last a long time. Not always easy to find it though.

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          • #6
            I've had some luck using carnuba paste wax. Bit of work to apply, but it buffs up nice and seems to last.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              Maybe if it WAS aluminum it would be better. the shiny outside of airplanes is aluminum.

              It's likely some sort of aluminum alloy, and many alloys are poor from a corrosion standpoint. Corrosion is also a problem in areas with salt spray for several miles in from any seacoast.

              Greases. waxes, anytjhing that keeps water and salt from hitting the metal.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #8
                It's strange. When I served on a ship on the west coast, our after deck house was made from aluminum and corrosion was a bitch. I also lived near the Oregon coast and had a spot scraped, to bare metal, on my car, about the size of a nickle and it stayed bright and shiny for 3 years, no rust at all. Cars last along time there but it is the exact opposite on the east coast.
                The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                • #9
                  They aren't shiny because the housings are die cast not polished rolled sheet like the outside of airplanes. But they are aluminum. Alloy for sure but so are airplane skins, engine blocks, heads, pop cans, wheels....

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                    They aren't shiny because the housings are die cast not polished rolled sheet like the outside of airplanes. But they are aluminum. Alloy for sure but so are airplane skins, engine blocks, heads, pop cans, wheels....
                    J tiers response is justz highlighting the fact that pure aluminum is very corrosion resistant. Airplane skins are a composite of almost pure al on the outside, for corrosion resistance, and some other alloy on the inside for strength. It's called alclad or something like that.

                    As you add alloying elements to al, it loses some of its natural corrosion resistance (generally speaking, of course).

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                    • #11
                      Spray on Boeshield T9. Done.

                      Developed by Boeing.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                        Spray on Boeshield T9. Done.

                        Developed by Boeing.
                        Plus one.

                        -Doozer
                        DZER

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Royldean View Post
                          J tiers response is justz highlighting the fact that pure aluminum is very corrosion resistant. Airplane skins are a composite of almost pure al on the outside, for corrosion resistance, and some other alloy on the inside for strength. It's called alclad or something like that.

                          As you add alloying elements to al, it loses some of its natural corrosion resistance (generally speaking, of course).
                          Yep, that's the deal. It is called alclad, at least from one supplier. I have pieces of it. The strong alloys are horrible for corrosion, but pure Al is pretty resistant...

                          Spray or paint on whatever puts a good coating on. Boeshield may be good, especially if you use it for the same sort of environment it is intended for, which as I understand it, is enclosed spaces with little active spray etc hitting it.

                          The alternator is right up front in the car, exposed to everything that makes it through the radiator, or maybe gets splashed up from below. Salt for sure, at least up north, rain, heat, whatever.

                          If you are gonna spray it with something, you could just PAINT it....
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for all the good ideas guys. The new car is going to be a new Subaru Outback. After I get it home and see just how much exposed aluminum there is and how accessible it is I will probably spray it with some sort of ?????
                            _____________________________________________

                            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                            Oregon Coast

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                            • #15
                              T9 is good for a year in extreme conditions. Try it... and tell me how it works in a year or two, but don't get it on your belts!

                              The Subaru alternator is front dead center on the top of the motor. Not much of consequence gets up there, and it's never "wet". Mine's 17 years old, looks a bit grimy and some light white powder in places, but is fine. Inlet manifold is the same way.

                              Btw, I don't worry too much about the alternator - the entire engine and transmission is uncoated aluminum alloy and has very minor corrosion, but lots of road crap stuck to it. The car gets get plenty of road salt and grit from the winter mountain passes (skiing).
                              Last edited by lakeside53; 04-21-2014, 11:31 AM.

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