Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to sell extra metal?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to sell extra metal?

    About three years ago my high school robotics team received a large donation of stainless steel and aluminum from a local metal seller. A lot of the aluminum we could use on our robot, but we received several larger pieces that would just not be practical to use on our robot (we have a 120 lb weight limit). The stainless steel is also too heavy to use on the robot. After moving this several times within the school the students have finally decided that it is time to sell and use the cash for other parts that we can use on our robot.

    All of the metal is good stuff and a variety of bars, plates, sheets. We have some stuff that if you were to buy it retail would cost you $6/inch.

    My question to the group is how best to sell it? Craigslist, Garage sale, scrap dealer, ebay, etc. Any thoughts and/or ideas?

    I am just a volunteer for the team so I don't want to spend a lot of time selling this metal.

    If you are interested, our robot this year can be seen at http://firebears.org down at the bottom of the page.

    Thank you for your help!

    - Tom

  • #2
    How much you get for it will depend on how much work someone wants to put in, the time frame by when it "must be" sold things like that...are there any hobby machinist or model railroad clubs in your immediate area?
    It also sort of depends what you mean by larger pieces as to who else may think they have a use for it...maybe there is someone out there who would swap what they have and don't want for what you have and don't want provided their bits are what you need/want. Maybe there is a machine shop that could make use of those larger pieces...perhaps a swap for machining work/time.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ebay or craigslist. You won't get squat for it if it goes to scrap. Let me know what bigger pieces of aluminum you have, I need some for a telescope mount I am building.

      Comment


      • #4
        The Practical Machinist board has a classifieds section. You might list it there. "For Sale" posts are not allowed here without prior approval.

        http://classified.practicalmachinist.com/
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

        Comment


        • #5
          Your project looks great! We made a "robot" in high school. It was made from PVC pipe, plywood, an old electric wheelchair, and some sticks. All my team got to do was paint the stupid thing. That was the extent of the student involvement. The thing seems to have had mysteriously built itself overnight. Would have been fun us students actually got to work on it. We had all kinds of ideas that I think we could have pulled off but the teachers shot them down. So we ended up with a ridiculous looking thing that looked like a decrepit dumpster on wheels and could do nothing but drive around and crash into things under radio control. Some robot. Thinking back now it makes me want to build my own robot.

          Comment


          • #6
            I would suggest ebay and to do it as a school project. There is educational value in showing students how to post an ad on ebay and how to collect the money, ship things, etc.. Sounds like no big deal but if I was the teacher I'd jump at that chance. Slowly sell what you want. Then with that skill going you could sell other things the program or school would like to sell. Maybe set up a school paypal account to collect the money and teach what that is about too.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Metalwrkr View Post
              I would suggest ebay and to do it as a school project. There is educational value in showing students how to post an ad on ebay and how to collect the money, ship things, etc.. Sounds like no big deal but if I was the teacher I'd jump at that chance. Slowly sell what you want. Then with that skill going you could sell other things the program or school would like to sell. Maybe set up a school paypal account to collect the money and teach what that is about too.
              I agree. Probably most students are familiar with ebay, many probably have sold stuff there, as well as CL. But writing a good ad is essential, and following through and completing the sale in a business-like fashion is something that needs to be taught. Almost every business has need of these skills.

              Comment


              • #8
                To my way of thinking, selling it locally would put you in direct competition with the folks who were generous enough to give you the material. I think that would best be avoided.
                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Lynn makes an excellent point. You might go back to the folks who donated the metal and let them know your dilemma and get their ideas on how to solve the problem. After all, they are in the business of selling metal.
                  Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                  ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    3-4 years ago, things here at the shop got SLOW, really really SLOW...

                    I sold several tons of material on E-bay and PM. Some of it was certified, some of it not certified...

                    Some of the pieces I was selling per each... Some of it was random grab bags or assorted stuff, those went pretty fast on E-bay.

                    On the per each pieces... Add $10 and I'd finish filling up a medium flat rate with random drops, $15 and I'd finish filling up a large...

                    Paid the bills for a few months doing that, probably sent out close to 100 boxes.. Screwed up the mail ladies back so bad that we were
                    driving around dropping boxes off at different post offices.

                    I didn't realize how much crap we had around here, until selling several thousand dollars of it didn't even make a dent.

                    Keep the prices cheap to reasonable and use flat rate boxes, pack them good. 68lbs from New Mexico to Connecticut in 2 days for
                    about $15.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would suggest you ask the donor if it's OK to sell them. They probably won't mind but making sure ensures your supply for the next years.
                      I supply bearings to a lot of student projects throughout the country and would be displeased if they started selling off the uber expensive precision bearings. I wouldn't mind them selling the regular stuff though.

                      Igor

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Like bobw53 said, selling it in flat rate boxes for a decent price is the way to go. I would keep the prices between 50% of new and double scrap value.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X