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Inventory your shop?

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  • Inventory your shop?

    Well, I dove in head-first yesterday.
    I started to inventory everything in my shop to keep a permanent record, and to hopefully insure everything.
    YIKES!!
    You never realize just how much stuff you actually have in the shop, until you start putting it on paper.
    I started with the big toys. Machine tools and compressor.
    Then listed Lathe accessories, Mill accessories, Surface Grinder accessories. Tooling (taps, drills, dies, endmills, reamers, etc.), Measuring/Inspecting tools, Thread gages, Hand tools, bench tools.... etc. etc. etc.
    This was just off the top of my head.
    Today, I'll do an actual walk-thru, and see everything I forgot about.
    I spent the better part of yesterday listing everything, and then finding a replacement cost for each tool online.
    WOW!!
    Them toys add up.
    Anyone else feel motivated to do an Inventory?

  • #2
    Originally posted by KiddZimaHater View Post
    ...Anyone else feel motivated to do an Inventory?
    Yeah, I've been motivated for years. Just haven't done it, though.

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    • #3
      I did it a while ago, it was actually pretty easy for me because I did it while I was moving. Everything I packed was inventoried as it went into crates.
      I didn't do it to actually inventory anything, It was just because the new house doesn't have a shop or garage, so it was done to make it easier when I needed to dig something out of a box.
      Since then I have started writing things down as I obtain them.

      20 years ago, I inventoried my old 24x40 barn, started out trying to get like with like, (hand tools, wood working tools, machining tools etc) and decided it was far easier to simply inventory everything in 8x10ft sections and sort it out on the list later.
      Right after I moved here, I got the bright idea to catalog my books, that was a mistake spent over 6 months on it, I never did completely finish.

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      • #4
        As I am getting older, I feel the need to categorize and inventory if for no other reason than to make the estate sale easier and more lucrative for my wife or whoever. Started by putting small cards in each toolbox drawer with an approximate value. Since I have laughingly told my wife I paid "$5.00" for some things, I would hate to think she would actually sell for $5:00

        I have told my best friend that he'd better get to the shop before all the vultures....

        Richard

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        • #5
          The easiest way to do this for insurance purposes is with good quality photos of every piece of equipment, drawer, or box. If more than a single layer of stuff in a container, spread it out so that each individual piece can be identified from the photo. You will probably need a camera (hi-res digital is fine) with a macro lens to get good sharp pictures from close enough for ID.

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          • #6
            Or just walk through with a video camera and then you get long shots, close shots of data plates and audio descriptions of the item all at once.

            Steve

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            • #7
              What a coincidence, I just started to do an inventory about 3 weeks ago. Filled in 7 sheets of paper from memory. Nothing real costly, mill and lathe were about 1500 combined. but after collecting for 40 years the small stuff has a way of adding up. The real bizzar thing is all I've ever made was more tools. and a nut-cracker. (I don't even eat nuts) I enjoy this hobby alot. But I can fully understand how an outsider has no choice but to look at it as a mental illness. :-/

              Hoof

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              • #8
                I have had an inventory of my tool for a lot of years, but I cannot take credit for being that diligent.
                An employer I had a way back required every mechanic to supply a list of tools for their insurance coverage.
                I kept it up and when the shop got broke into of a later employer and all my tools were stolen the list came in handy and I got everything replaced.
                I have since upgraded it from paper to a data base on the computer and usually add items to it when they are purchased.
                Once you have a list it is relatively easy to keep it up.
                I put in the original purchase price which is probably quite out of date now, so I guess I should try and go through it and update prices.
                That would be a bit of a job.
                Larry

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                • #9
                  I put in the original purchase price which is probably quite out of date now
                  OOOhhhhh yeah....
                  While I was doing the 'replacement cost' of each tool, I was shocked by the current prices.
                  The biggest increase is with Micrometers, Calipers, and Indicators.
                  And thread gages are astronomical.
                  Quite the eye-opener.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mooney1el View Post
                    ...Since I have laughingly told my wife I paid "$5.00" for some things, I would hate to think she would actually sell for $5:00...
                    Yeah, I can see that coming back to bite you; especially if your wife finds out before you die that you fudged on some of the prices. Of course none of the rest of us have ever done that so I guess we're safe...
                    Keith
                    __________________________
                    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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                    • #11
                      I have inventories of the shop equipment, both the wood shop and metal shop. I included the serial number on serialized tools. I went one step further -- I also took pictures of all the equipment -- all the machines individually, then the tool chests with each drawer open, one level at a time. Then a copy of the list (Word document converted to pdf) and all the photos gets burned to a DVD that is kept at my son's house.

                      Yea, I know, I'm (insert term here - I can't put in the ones my wife uses).

                      Edit: And I forgot to add that I scan the receipts I got and include those on the DVD as well.
                      Last edited by KJ1I; 04-27-2014, 03:22 PM.
                      Kevin

                      More tools than sense.

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                      • #12
                        Next Step....

                        Mount a Laser Pointer in a motorized Gimbal Mount that's Mounted on your Ceiling.
                        Connect it to your computer with your newly created Database from your inventory.
                        Have your geeky grandson write some code.

                        Now you can enter "Where is my Stupid 4" Left Handed Monkey Wrench".
                        The Laser will point to Drawer #35.

                        Tom M.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SteveF View Post
                          Or just walk through with a video camera and then you get long shots, close shots of data plates and audio descriptions of the item all at once.

                          Steve



                          Thats what my insurance company told me to do. There is no way I would go threw and write everything down, it would take me weeks!
                          Andy

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                          • #14
                            I did rough inventory of stock about 3 years ago. Back in the beginning days I never gave it a thought to do so. As raw materials started to pile up I would say...... I'll remember where I got that piece of steel from and what I used it for........Yea, right. 20 plus years later I have all kinds of stock laying around the shop. Some of it I remember where I got it from and what I used it for as well as what material it is. Now I mark every piece of steel I get, the alloy and where I got it from, the price and what I used it on. Same goes with hardware, nuts bolts etc. As far as hand tools, drill bits, end mills etc. not yet. I don't see the real need to do so.

                            JL..................

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                            • #15
                              Having lived through a total-loss fire, Ive never seen any point in it. First and foremost I could never afford a policy based upon new replacement cost and secondly I'd never get a settlement at full new replacement cost, only a percentage based upon depreciation which occurs rapidly. Rather than piss about with that I pay for an agreed value policy. If I have a total loss for any reason, I know right now I am not getting rich but will make enough to easily replace my collection on the used market.
                              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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