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Good, bad, and ugly - odd tools

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Now you have me wondering if were all talking about the same guy???

    Leave a comment:


  • KiddZimaHater
    replied
    When I met Rick, I didn't think he would manufacture a 5.953 endmill.
    Maybe Rick made a 6mm. ??

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by spinningwheels View Post
    Think that the milling bit is metrick. 15/64 is 5,953 mm

    Hmmm - when I metrick I don't think he had any of those - when was the first time you seen him?

    Leave a comment:


  • spinningwheels
    replied
    Think that the milling bit is metrick. 15/64 is 5,953 mm

    Leave a comment:


  • PStechPaul
    started a topic Good, bad, and ugly - odd tools

    Good, bad, and ugly - odd tools

    I have what seems to be a carbide milling bit with 5 flutes, but the size (including the shank) is 15/64" (and not 1/4" as I had thought it was). I remember buying it a long time ago to attempt some light milling, such as making a slot in a piece of phenolic, but when I returned to the industrial supply store where I think I got it, they no longer carried such items. I could find similar tools, but they are usually with four flutes, and 15/64" end mills have 1/4" or other more standard sizes. Here is a picture:



    That's the good. As for the bad and ugly, I found some drill bits that were part of a set of 13 that I bought for cheap when I was just a teen in the early 1960s. That was before there were cheap Chinese tools, and before "Made in Japan" meant high quality. I used them mostly for wood, but I also may have used them on steel bar and angle, using a 1/4" electric drill (remember when they were the norm?) Anyway, they seem to have been roughly ground from a chunk of rather soft steel, and no raised edge on the flutes, which probably accounts for the problems I remember having with them jamming and getting hot and breaking. My father, who had been a machinist, had a nice set of numbered drills, but they were "off-limits". Have a look:



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