Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Drill to mill, update

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Drill to mill, update

    I have finished making the collet holder for the spindle of my Strands drill press that I am converting to a light duty mill. This job worked out really well with no snags. In the first pic the original spindle is in the back (it didn't have the six tapped holes to start with) and the spindle has a collet in it.



    The milling cutter is inserted in the collet and the spindle is driven down with the quill feed to tightly seat it. Then the steel 1 1/2" X 14 tpi retainer is wound up to the collet with a two pin spanner to keep it there. It takes around 20 ft lbs of torque to make the cutter slip in the collet. That works out to several hundred pounds of force at the edge of a 3/4" milling cutter. It should work.


    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  • #2
    Looking good...excellent appearing work and excellent photos to boot. You're giving me a complex!

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice work,that should work out fine.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #4
        How DOOOO you get your stuff so shiny

        Are you going to make holders for small endmills so that you can work close to a dividing head?
        To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

        Comment


        • #5
          Beautiful. I specially like the insert idea. Do you plan to tighten the collet with the 6 cap screws or by turning the threaded insert?

          Paul A.
          Paul A.

          Make it fit.
          You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

          Comment


          • #6
            Paul, the threaded insert is screwed against the collet rim with an angle grinder spanner wrench to hold it (the collet) in place. The part with the cap screws is permanently fastened in place.

            George,

            Polish, polish, polish...

            Oh, and yes, I do plan on making some different tool holders for it. I have a couple of blank MT3 arbours that can be pressed into service using a slightly different retaining insert.



            [This message has been edited by Evan (edited 05-13-2004).]
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              I registered just to post this reply, so obviously, kudos on your workmanship. I'm sure as I search the older posts, I'll see a lot of good stuff from you and others!

              A simple question: Why do you need to seat the endmill in the collet using the downfeed and then tighten the retaining nut (i.e. the part with the spanner holes)? Of course, I'm not questioning your procedure, just curious. I would have thought that you could just tighten the nut with the spanner and be done with it. I guess there could be friction factors not allowing the collet to close properly, but I would guess they are small compared to the forces given by the threads.

              If there is a previous post detailing the answers to these questions, feel free to post the link without repeating responses.

              Thanks again. I hope that during the coming years I can post some projects/methods that others find useful.

              Sandy.

              Comment


              • #8
                That is a good question Sandy. It doesn't tighten enough just winding in the insert. That is likely due to friction against the end of the collet and also the fact that the bore in the spindle is a bit worn. I really should buy a MT3 reamer and touch up the spindle. Also I am going to make a hardened washer to go between the retainer and the collet, that should reduce friction since the retainer won't be trying to rotate against the slits in the collet. I also plan to make a couple of MT3 holders of more or less conventional style.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                Comment


                • #9
                  That's some mighty fine craftsmanship Evan!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Evan,if that friction becomes a problem,I have several collet chucks that work the same way,they have a needle thrust bearing instead of a plain washer,you can get them really tight really easy,plus they release easy too.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X