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Owning Old Ford Trucks

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  • Owning Old Ford Trucks

    I been having a dilemma. Bought another Old Ford F250 4x4 7.5 litre engine. The heater control Cable that operates the cold to warm dash control was missing. Did a dye test on the A/C and alls good but need this Cable. No-One around here has it . Its just too old. Any ideas Guys? I also own a 1984 F250, Both are good runners still. Thankyou Mike

  • #2
    Hit a salvage yard

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    • #3
      Originally posted by madman View Post
      Bought another Old Ford F250 4x4 7.5 litre engine. The heater control Cable that operates the cold to warm dash control was missing.
      How old is old?

      Make a cable.

      Did you try RockAuto dot com?

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      • #4
        Maybe you could adapt a manual choke cable.
        Is the cable you have plastic coated?

        paul
        paul
        ARS W9PCS

        Esto Vigilans

        Remember, just because you can doesn't mean you should...
        but you may have to

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        • #5
          Check out one of the on line companies that provide parts to aircraft home builders such as wagaero.com. Do a search on throttle cable and look for just the threaded end replacement cables. Fairly cheap and easy to adapt to your needs.

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          • #6
            Do a Google search for "Morse Cables". They're used in all kinds of marine and equipment applications--should be no problem finding something that will work...
            Keith
            __________________________
            Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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            • #7
              People buy cables and linkages? Ive always just made my own from baling wire or whatever was available. If I needed the sleeved variety or special ends, the local mower shop bought the sleeved variety by the roll and had every conceivable end on hand to crimp on.
              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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              • #8
                Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
                People buy cables and linkages? Ive always just made my own from baling wire or whatever was available. If I needed the sleeved variety or special ends, the local mower shop bought the sleeved variety by the roll and had every conceivable end on hand to crimp on.
                yep, lawn mower shop, they use the same type cables. we call them bowden cables. solid wire in a sleeve. easy to make.
                san jose, ca. usa

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
                  People buy cables and linkages? Ive always just made my own from baling wire or whatever was available. If I needed the sleeved variety or special ends, the local mower shop bought the sleeved variety by the roll and had every conceivable end on hand to crimp on.
                  In the "push pull" type situation which is typical of the usual heater valve application/function I would think bailing wire a very poor choice as it might be "OK" with the pulling part but the pushing is compressional and takes a tempered wire,
                  So it most likely would just buckle when pushing the control back,

                  I say "OK" in the pulling due to many times the cables are ran just in wound steel sheaths - so a "gummy" non hardened material can quickly build up burrs and or wear faster esp. around bends,,,
                  bailing wire might work if it's strictly for pull and there is a return spring on the other side, but still some day you may find the mechanism is not wanting to return properly...

                  hardness drastically reduces both friction and wear, even in linkages...

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                  • #10
                    What about a new bicycle brake cable I think you can buy it by the foot. Alistair
                    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                    • #11
                      The '67 Ford pickups had choke type push-pull controls for the heat and vent controls.
                      The 1st Broncos too. In '68 Ford went to the slide controls in their trucks.
                      I really like the '67s for the body style and simple mechanicals.
                      Would love one with a 300-6 and a modern 5 speed, highway rear gears, 2wd and posi.
                      8 foot bed of course, because I use a truck to haul stuff.
                      Heater controls (Bowden cables) are pretty simple to make.
                      I have a little bend jig thingy from my lawn mower repair days to make the Z in the cable.
                      Other end is usually a spring loop. Easy to make as well.

                      --Doozer
                      DZER

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Alistair Hosie View Post
                        What about a new bicycle brake cable I think you can buy it by the foot. Alistair

                        Mr. Hosie the bike cable is tempered and that's good but it's also stranded,,, and not a very good choice for compressional as the multiple strands and the spiral wind make it very vulnerable to buckling...

                        really depends on the layout of things - if it's not having to "stick it's neck out" far then it can handle short distances,,, but generally heater control valves have a fair amount of travel --- and just as important is the fact that they are a pivot lever at the business end and not a straight pull, this usually starts out with the cable being at an angle from the sheath mount with the valve all the way in one position, then middle position going even further in the opposite direction, then farthest out back to being to the other side again, so to keep the mount farther away and the cable end longer cuts down on this radical angle and therefore friction - but in turn makes the cable more flimsy... it's a task best suited for single wire tempered cable...

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                        • #13
                          Old mig gun liner and solid core wire works.

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                          • #14
                            They're easy to make. I've made or repaired a number of lawnmower control and throttle cables. I use electric fence wire for most of them. I run the wire through one of the many plastic control cables I have. Most of the heater control cables had the clip molded in but you could use a simple wrap type clamp to hold it in place. If there's heavy push load, you can use spring wire instead of the fence wire. A lot of those just had a coil at the end that fit over the door arm. The control end may be just a dog leg in the wire.

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                            • #15
                              I just made one, rather adapted one to my 1950 Chevy pickup. I had a generic choke cable and took the knob from the original, drilled out the stem and crimped the new wire in place. So now I have a new cable and the original knob to keep the look correct. Took all of a few minutes.

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