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A new engine for fall---

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  • DejaVu---Thanks for stopping by and saying Hi. When I get to this stage of a build, and people don't have much to say, I always start to wonder if I'm posting in a vacuum and nobody is looking. I'm just getting to the exciting part now. Next up will be the two piece cylinder.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • Hi Brian
      ... I always start to wonder if I'm posting in a vacuum and nobody is looking.
      The silence you hear is everyone staring in awe and amazement of the beautiful work you do. I find your threads very interesting and enjoy reading about the
      techniques you use to machine your parts as well as the fixes you employ when something does not work out. I refrain from commenting in your threads too
      often to keep the noise to a minimum (maybe others do as well).
      Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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      • Hi Brian -
        I have followed your builds since I first joined the Forums. Your machining skills are getting better and better as time goes on.
        This is looking like one of your best ones yet!
        Kansas City area

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        • Cowabunga!!! I like that!! And that is the last easy part finished for a while. I want to see what this thing looks like with a cylinder on it.
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

          Comment


          • Thanks guys.
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

            Comment


            • I just had to share this, because I know all you old grandpa types like me will love it. This shot was taken last week as the girls were heading back to school for 2014. Brennen is too young for school, but he wanted to be in the picture. Wife and I just got back from our first "overnighter" with all 3 grandkids. Drove 185 Km up to Bancroft to see my 94 year old mother and wish her a happy birthday. There is always a certain amount of trepidation when taking a grandkid away overnight for his/her very first time, but Brennen was a trooper and probably slept better than I did. "Little Grandma" was happy to see Bren, as the last time she seen him he was a new born.
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

              Comment


              • This is going to be---well--tricky. There is no great science in the cylinder itself, other than having to hold my breath for minutes at a time while I plunge cut the 3/8" deep grooves with my .093" wide HSS parting off tool. The tricky bit will be in machining the three different levels of "flat" without breaking any fins in the process. I am told not to use cutting fluid when machining cast iron. Any good advice would be well appreciated before I get too deeply into this.---Brian
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • As I understand it, grey pearlitic cast iron has a high graphite content, and as a consequence it is self lubricating. That is why it is popular for use in engine blocks and cylinder liners. Of course, this explains why you don't NEED coolant/lubrication when machining it, but it doesn't explain WHY you shouldn't use lubrication/coolant when machining it. I just googled it, and the Sandvic website confirmed what I thought about not needing lubricant, but it didn't say anything about not being supposed to use lubricant. On a deep plunge cut like the fins require, I would think that the use of lubricant would help flush out chips and keep the tool from grabbing and/or binding, but I don't know for sure.
                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                  Comment


                  • Brian,

                    Seeing as it's cast iron, and you're worried about breaking the fins when machining the flats, have you considered machining the flats prior to machining the fins? An interrupted cut on cast iron isn't as bad as it would be on steel.

                    mark

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                    • I'm here watching too, keep up the awesome work Brian!
                      Andy

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                      • Yes - and thanks for the pic of the kids! That one picture is Norman Rockwell material!
                        Last edited by Toolguy; 09-08-2014, 03:36 PM.
                        Kansas City area

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                        • One reason I machined my cast iron cylinder dry was so I could suck up the chips with my shopvac while I cut. I've heard CI chips are abrasive... No need making a lapping compound of oil and CI chips on the lathe ways.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                            DejaVu---Thanks for stopping by and saying Hi. When I get to this stage of a build, and people don't have much to say, I always start to wonder if I'm posting in a vacuum and nobody is looking. I'm just getting to the exciting part now. Next up will be the two piece cylinder.---Brian
                            I don't talk in the middle of the movie. I wait til its over.

                            Comment


                            • Brian, just make sure your grooving tool is sharp and has some side rake. Make sure it is on center. Parting tools break, not necessarily because they dig in, but because of the chip load. It's the reason parting tools are mounted upside down.

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                              • Rustybolt---I've always kind of wondered about that "upside down" parting off tool theory. It must work, because I see a lot of people promoting it on the forums. It has been my experience that when parting off with any kind of cutting lubricant, that the influence of gravity would be minimal. However, I will freely admit that when it comes to parting off, I'm a big *****!!!---Brian---EDIT--That was a surprise--I guess the "familiar" name for a cat is disallowed by George's software.
                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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