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  • While this guy is using castings it gives some instruction about using a 24v fan motor for a generator.

    Cheers,
    Jon

    Comment


    • Okay--Comment as called for. I don't have a stepper motor. Neither do I have a small automotive d.c. motor. I have no doubt that people are absolutely correct in what they are telling me about them. I have seen working demonstrations of them on Youtube and various other forums. I have not seen somebody do this with a bicycle dynamo, and I wonder if it can be done. Someone has given me a bicycle dynamo, and it is currently in the mail on the way to my house. I appreciate that so many folks have posted about d.c. motors and steppers, but I really have no desire to recreate work that has been done before and proven many times over. That does not mean I am unappreciative of the posts people have put up for me, to "help out". Thank you to everyone for being helpful. I may not be successful in what I plan to do, and if not, I will post for everyone to see. if I am successful, then I will post about that.----Brian
      Brian Rupnow
      Design engineer
      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

      Comment


      • A huge THANK YOU to Jim Dunmyer out of Michigan for "volunteering" me a bicycle generator (dynamo). I have a few preliminary tests to do tomorrow, and if my side-valve engine has enough grunt to drive it, I will start a new thread on my "Lighting Plant".
        Brian Rupnow
        Design engineer
        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

        Comment


        • Internal lubeircation of Brian Rupnow's flat head engine.


          Given that I use only propane to run my engines presents some lube problems as can't mix any 2 cycle oil. In this case with only the pre- lubed crank pin needle bearnig how do the piston and wrist pin plus ring/s if used get lubercated?
          Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
          After having a look at the Val, an engine designed by Brian Fairey, and seeing how his head bolts held the head and the cylinder to the top of the crankcase, I thought YES---why not!!! This somewhat lessons the complexity of the cylinder shape, but even more importantly, it opens up a clearance directly below the valves, allowing room for the tappets. Not much room, mind you, but if I followed someones advice about mushroom headed tappets I might be able to make something work here.

          Comment


          • I don't have a good answer to your question, because that engine was designed to run on a fuel/oil mix.--Brian
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

            Comment


            • Brian, I recall those old wheel dynamos from my early days. They cogged so badly that engaging them was very much like riding with the brakes held partially on. There's no way that they should NEED that amount of energy dragged out of my youthful body at the time to produce a single candle worth of light.

              There's very little difference between a motor and a generator or alternator. Much of it in the number of turns of wire. You may wish to consider the idea of buying one or two of the very inexpensive brushless motors used for electric flying and rewind the coils with more turns of somewhat finer wire.

              Brushless motors "cog" as well at slow speeds. But they have a lot less cogging resistance once up to speed. Installing a regular prop on a motor and giving it a good flick results in the motor turning for a surprisingly long time before it slows down enough to brake hard from the cogging resistance. A rewound brushless motor would turn out 3 phase power so likely you'd want to run it through a set of six diodes to convert to DC.

              The other good news is that you can buy such motors in a variety of sizes for super cheap from the online source "Hobby King";

              http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/index.asp

              I'd suggest the "outrunner" style simply because the more or less standard looking internal armature would be easier to deal with than an "inrunner" that has the coils in the outer jacket. You'll need suitable wire to rewind the armature to provide more turns within the fixed volume. You'll likely want to use something like #22 or #24 enamelled wire.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

              Comment


              • Somebody has revived this old old thread. This engine was finished two years ago almost.---This engine is on the front page of the current Home Shop Machinist magazine for November 2016. all the plans will be in the next 3 or 4 issues.---Brian
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                  Somebody has revived this old old thread. This engine was finished two years ago almost.---This engine is on the front page of the current Home Shop Machinist magazine for November 2016. all the plans will be in the next 3 or 4 issues.---Brian
                  It's likely going to get revived a lot; I put the link to it in the article.
                  George
                  Traverse City, MI

                  Comment


                  • Hopefully Paul will heed the "heads up" on this being an old thread.
                    Not sure if he can handle opening another thread from the past! LOL
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
                      It's likely going to get revived a lot; I put the link to it in the article.
                      Okay George--thanks for the heads up.---Brian
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                      Comment


                      • Brian, do you see many problems if I were to craft your flat head with a wet base crankcase given I only use propane to fun my engines? Would put a small dipper on side or bottom of the rod. Are the drawings any other place for this engine other wise it will be June to see the last ones. HSM says 3 possabily a 4 series.

                        Comment


                        • Yes, you can make the base oiltight and you don't really need a dipper on the rod. All you need id a .093" hole in the rod cap. You can quite safely use Oilite bronze bushings for the rod bearings at both ends as well.
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                          Comment


                          • Thanks Brain
                            Harvey

                            Comment


                            • I never got my picture on the cover of "Rolling stone" but I did get one of my engines on the cover of an internationally famous machining magazine!!!---Thank you, George!!!

                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                              Comment


                              • What a rush!! I just got this video from Dick in Ohio.
                                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjF51Zd7HbQ
                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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