Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gearing up to weld aluminum

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    I took a TIG welding class for aluminum. I learned the basics and then some. Then I got a side job at home welding up aluminum carts for a guy using a Miller syncrowave 200. I beat my head against the table for a while. In the end I got a decent weld but had big learning curve issues as follows:

    A) My biggest and most persistent gremlin is getting a CLEAN tungsten. I have tried many methods and they all work sometimes for me. My bootleg fall-back method which works very well but is risky is to turn the power up and heat the tungsten up on a copper plate. When the tungsten ball melts and starts to quiver, I flick the molten ball off and watch that hot ball of tungsten go somewhere and smoke. Now I have a clean tungsten and can weld very well. I must learn to solve this one!

    B) After a long run of frustration, I finally changed the cup for the first time. That made a world of difference and my contamination issues dropped by half. The old cup was solid black inside and contributed to my problems.

    C) I got a bad tank of gas. I used the whole tank and got very good at slugging it through contamination. At the very end of the tank I came to the conclusion it might be bad gas and a new tank confirmed that. The sheer amount of effort that I expended on that bad tank made my work look darn near professional once I had good gas again.

    I still have a problem getting a good tungsten. I tried snapping them off using several techniques. They worked maybe most of the time but the other times I got an invisible longitudinal crack up the tungsten and that screws the arc up. I now use a dedicated grinder and wheel but that doesn't always get me going. I still resort to the copper plate and flick off the molten ball method but that is an accident waiting to happen. That HOT ball is HOT. I would hate to have it in my boot or burn down the shop. Getting a clean tungsten is by far my biggest problem. Fortunately I know if my arc is good or bad before I lay filler to it now.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Mekanizm View Post
      I took a TIG welding class for aluminum. I learned the basics and then some. Then I got a side job at home welding up aluminum carts for a guy using a Miller syncrowave 200. I beat my head against the table for a while. In the end I got a decent weld but had big learning curve issues as follows:

      A) My biggest and most persistent gremlin is getting a CLEAN tungsten. I have tried many methods and they all work sometimes for me. My bootleg fall-back method which works very well but is risky is to turn the power up and heat the tungsten up on a copper plate. When the tungsten ball melts and starts to quiver, I flick the molten ball off and watch that hot ball of tungsten go somewhere and smoke. Now I have a clean tungsten and can weld very well. I must learn to solve this one!

      B) After a long run of frustration, I finally changed the cup for the first time. That made a world of difference and my contamination issues dropped by half. The old cup was solid black inside and contributed to my problems.

      C) I got a bad tank of gas. I used the whole tank and got very good at slugging it through contamination. At the very end of the tank I came to the conclusion it might be bad gas and a new tank confirmed that. The sheer amount of effort that I expended on that bad tank made my work look darn near professional once I had good gas again.

      I still have a problem getting a good tungsten. I tried snapping them off using several techniques. They worked maybe most of the time but the other times I got an invisible longitudinal crack up the tungsten and that screws the arc up. I now use a dedicated grinder and wheel but that doesn't always get me going. I still resort to the copper plate and flick off the molten ball method but that is an accident waiting to happen. That HOT ball is HOT. I would hate to have it in my boot or burn down the shop. Getting a clean tungsten is by far my biggest problem. Fortunately I know if my arc is good or bad before I lay filler to it now.
      Sorry but flicking your hot balls is not what I would be doing (LOL). I had a Sync 180 (very similar to Sync 200) and when I did aluminum I would just grind to a point and as I used it, the tungesten would ball up on its own.
      I have a miller dynasty inveter machine and the settings allow you to keep a fairly sharp tungsten when using A/C. Grind with a dedicated wheel(there are many many wheels and theories here, not going to get into that) and make sure you hold the tungsten vertically (point facing the floor) and turning as you do it.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by tjs View Post
        Sorry but flicking your hot balls is not what I would be doing

        Damn near noodles out the nose! Thats signature kind of material there.
        Andy

        Comment

        Working...
        X