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T~Nuts done better (DeVlieg's way)

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  • #31
    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    Tee nut set was a drilling, hacksawing, fileing and tapping exercise in tech college when i went years ago, the junction between the vertical and horizontal was an 1/8 inch drilled hole, then you got to hacksaw and file out the shoulders leaving the hole neatly quatered, im glad i only had to make 4, it was hard work, but good to learn, the same was later repeated on a vertical mill, horizontal mill and shaper, you soon learn to appreciate machine metal removal as opposed to hand and sweat!
    Good bit is you get to keep some handy oil blackened tee nuts, the studs were next, diestock and hacksaw, then single point on a lathe, then a coventry die on a capstan, think it was a ward 2A.
    I actually enjoyed it, must be a bit mad but i pushed my buttons!
    I liked the hairpin clamps, havent seen one since the 70s, must add a set to the to do list
    Mark
    Some excersize allong these lines should be the hurtle that decides if permanent hire is an option.
    If ya can't do it, and we don't need an errand boy or grease monkey, Bye Bye.

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    • #32
      Old Hat and Forrest --

      You guys have used a couple of terms to describe planer furniture that I'm not familiar with, and I'd appreciate your filling me in. The terms in question are these:

      1. kicker (Other than a football player, I thought a kicker was a horizontal jack used to push a machine on its foundation.)

      2. crowding plate

      3. post plate

      4. kicker plate

      Thanks,

      John

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      • #33
        Would be easyer if I knew how to extract pics outta here.
        http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?i...iew=1up;seq=56
        Rosco put this in early~er in the thread .... start about page 40.

        I could just drop the pics in your post.
        Hmnnn?

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Old Hat View Post
          Would be easyer if I knew how to extract pics outta here.
          http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?i...iew=1up;seq=56
          Rosco put this in early~er in the thread .... start about page 40.

          I could just drop the pics in your post.
          Hmnnn?
          The author of that book lived to be age 98. He wrote dozens of books early in life including some about the first years of aviation. There goes my spare time

          http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu...2c%201867-1965

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          • #35
            Good post - relieved T-nuts make sense, U-bend straps are meticulous and amazing looking...

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            • #36
              You can copy the image locations by right-clicking and selecting:





              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
              USA Maryland 21030

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              • #37
                I love old metalwork books, old i think because there aren't any new ones!
                Mark

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                • #38
                  Furniture?

                  I use it on the shaper.... stuff like these



                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #39
                    I guess I didn't phrase my question very well. I know what "planer furniture" is, and I know many individual types of planer furniture by the names that were commonly used in the textbooks of the first half of the 1900s. But many of those individual types of planer furniture have multiple names -- for example, I've seen or heard the piece that holds up the free end of a strap-clamp called a heel block, a packing block, an equalizer block, a riser, a clamping block, a clamp spacer, and a clamp chair.

                    Since I hadn't heard the four terms I asked about used to identify types of planer furniture, and I didn't find those terms linked to illustrations in the textbooks I've checked, I'm hoping that the folks who used those terms will correlate them with textbook figures or their more-usual names.

                    Thanks,

                    John

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by John Garner View Post
                      I guess I didn't phrase my question very well. I know what "planer furniture" is, and I know many individual types of planer furniture ........................
                      I'm hoping that the folks who used those terms will correlate them with textbook figures or their more-usual names.
                      Thanks,
                      John
                      OK John, ready for a treatice in the making.
                      Going to clear a few things up first.
                      Please read my new thread....then come back here, and I'll try to be helpfull.
                      Phil
                      ===============================
                      a vertical milling machine lives in 1 world, allong with jig-borers.
                      in another world lives horizontal milling/boring machines (bars) shapers, and planers.

                      in this world latteral forces, often extreme latteral forces are put
                      on the work-peice / work-peices.

                      so set-ups by necessity are much more involved.
                      hard-ware (furniture) may have a common name, several names,
                      or now and then no name to speak of.

                      usually a name depicts function, but that to varies.
                      country of origen or where a device gained prominance
                      might give it a name that is easilly recognised here but not there so to speak.

                      one group is tooling used as a buttrice, a fence, to both allign a part
                      and provide a solid wall to push against.

                      another group include tooling put into T-slots, or holes in the table.
                      even these holes have several names. but this tooling is for providing
                      force, either latteral jacking force, or down+latteral force to keep
                      the part from lifting. a sudgroup here might provide semi-upward
                      or ballancing force or counter force.

                      another group is the long members that are levers in funtion
                      holding parts down to the table.

                      a partner group is the bolting (studs and T-bolts and such) that act
                      as points of effort.

                      one group is blocking, risers, ladder-posts, table jacks that act as fulcrums.

                      the more i think about this, many tools also have muli-purpose funtions.
                      the slot-blocks i made and posted earlier would be one example.
                      they ape primarily "slot-blocks". a light press-fit into the T-slots on my Bar.
                      i can back-up a part, or have a finished face pushed against two of them,
                      and know it's paralell to the table. they have threaded hole and counterbored holes
                      for 3/8-16, 1/2-13, & 5/8-ll SHCS's. holes spaced for the DeVlieg modular's T-slots.

                      i can crowd parts, kick parts, or use them to mount parts with threaded holes
                      already in the base.

                      and still not to helping with names yet in specifics. sorry.

                      more tomorrow, i hope others will help with this too!!

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