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Finished rebuilding my mower spindle

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  • Finished rebuilding my mower spindle

    You guys may remember helping me out with 'tapered bearing preload' and the 'compound feed angle for single point threading'.
    It took a while but I got the spindle installed today and cut some grass.
    I have regained my appreciation for a 48" cut as opposed to the push mower.

    Here is a pic of all the parts that went into my modified/repaired assembly. Few were bought new, and few were left as-was.


    Here is the assembled unit. The shaft is .750 and the bucket above it is 3" OD.


    I've run it for an hour under heavy load(tall grass) and it feels the same as when I started.
    Mower fixed.
    Wife happy.
    Win Win.
    Last edited by MotorradMike; 08-02-2014, 06:07 PM.
    Mike

    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

  • #2
    Nice job. I lay out my parts the same way, just like reading a book.
    -Roland
    Golf Course Mechanic

    Bedminster NJ

    Comment


    • #3
      Did you make a new shaft? if so, is it made out of hard steel?

      I made a 5/8" Shaft for my bike outta mild steel, nice slip (but secure) fit over the steel.

      After a few 1000km, the shaft was about 0.1" smaller under the bearing races! the races had.. shrunk it. About 6HP at only a few 1000RPM through that shaft mind you, and mowers get significantly less use..

      Still, I would check for play once in awhile!

      Also, how come it now has 2 pulleys?
      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Black_Moons View Post
        Did you make a new shaft? if so, is it made out of hard steel?

        I made a 5/8" Shaft for my bike outta mild steel, nice slip (but secure) fit over the steel.

        After a few 1000km, the shaft was about 0.1" smaller under the bearing races! the races had.. shrunk it. About 6HP at only a few 1000RPM through that shaft mind you, and mowers get significantly less use..

        Still, I would check for play once in awhile!

        Also, how come it now has 2 pulleys?
        Most likely caused by the blade being out of balance compounded by vibration.

        JL...............

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
          Most likely caused by the blade being out of balance compounded by vibration.

          JL...............
          It was a jackshaft on a bike, there was no out of balance as it was driving just another sprocket. I was really amazed how much reduction of diameter resulted! I now know not to use mild steel for shafts that will have to go the distance, even if it survives the force and torque, it may not survive the distance.
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Black_Moons View Post
            Did you make a new shaft? if so, is it made out of hard steel?

            I made a 5/8" Shaft for my bike outta mild steel, nice slip (but secure) fit over the steel.

            After a few 1000km, the shaft was about 0.1" smaller under the bearing races! the races had.. shrunk it. About 6HP at only a few 1000RPM through that shaft mind you, and mowers get significantly less use..

            Still, I would check for play once in awhile!

            Also, how come it now has 2 pulleys?
            Here is the old shaft.

            I experienced the same diameter reduction that you did but I'd guess more like .075".
            the old shaft machines like leaded steel, I suspect they ran these off on a CNC.
            My new shaft is O1 drill rod and maybe I should have hardened it but I was afraid of warping it somehow.
            It will be taken apart for clean and lube every Winter. The original had a grease nipple and grease galleries but the grease seldom got to where it was needed.

            It always had 2 pulleys, PTO drives the top one, the bottom one drives the mower spindles(3).

            The mower runs off a Ford 1100, 13HP 2 cyl. Diesel.
            I'm not sure how much power the mower gets but since I have a Tach, I'm going to check the RPM.
            PTO RPM reads 540 on the tractor.
            Last edited by MotorradMike; 08-04-2014, 10:34 AM.
            Mike

            My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

            Comment


            • #7
              RPM details

              The tach is marked 540 at about 3200 engine RPM but that applies to the rear PTO, not the crankshaft PTO at the front.

              At 2,000 engine RPM the mower is running at 2500 RPM and the book says the mower should run at 3590 RPM so the engine needs to be at about 2800 RPM which is about what I've been doing.

              Here's hoping it lasts!
              Mike

              My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

              Comment


              • #8
                Very nice job Mike. By the looks of the finished product and the results you've obtained from actual use you did everything right.
                Just curious as to what method you used to obtain bearing preload.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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                • #9
                  Nice job, id be a bit wary of the galv roofing bolts though, got bit recently by them abruptly failing on a repair to a pump, i may have crappy ones though, not unusual for me!
                  Mark

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Willy View Post
                    Very nice job Mike. By the looks of the finished product and the results you've obtained from actual use you did everything right.
                    Just curious as to what method you used to obtain bearing preload.
                    I assembled the bearings with too long a spacer between, measured the clearance and made a spacer about .010 too long, shaved it after a second measurement and got it as close to zero + a bit, as I could.

                    Originally posted by boslab View Post
                    Nice job, id be a bit wary of the galv roofing bolts though, got bit recently by them abruptly failing on a repair to a pump, i may have crappy ones though, not unusual for me!
                    Mark
                    They are 7/16" carriage bolts which are not stocked by any suppliers handy to me. I found those in Ottawa and drove up only to find they were grade 2 instead of the original grade 5.
                    Maybe I should have cleaned up the old ones and used them.
                    They can't be removed without disassembling the whole thing.
                    Thanks for the heads up.
                    Mike

                    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                    Comment

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