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le blond sliding gap bed lathe

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  • le blond sliding gap bed lathe

    There is a le blond sliding gap bed lathe not so far away.

    With the stand on the tailstock side pivoting on the bottom end i imagine it is a former navy lathe.
    Anyone any experience with this type?

    I am going to have a look later this week and would apreciate pointers at what to look for in checking it out.

    cheers


    jan

  • #2
    I thought it was called . . . . Sliding Bed; Gap lathe?

    I dout you want to broadcast the listing, but if you capture pics from it
    you might scare up more interest in your thread.

    I for one would be thrilled to have one, providing it is intact and reasonably functional.

    Extreme example! below.
    Last edited by Old Hat; 08-07-2014, 06:49 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Old Hat View Post
      I thought it was called . . . . Sliding Bed; Gap lathe?

      I dout you want to broadcast the listing, but if you capture pics from it
      you might scare up more interest in your thread.

      I for one would be thrilled to have one, providing it is intact and reasonably functional.

      Extreme example! below.

      found a picture of the same lathe
      Last edited by janvanruth; 08-07-2014, 07:28 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        So, when do you take delivery?

        It's not for Navy, just a sturdy bed, that wants "three~point" wrighting.
        A good thing anytime it can be done!

        Some factorys had crude floors, no floors, and masive timber and plank floors.
        The bed remains "natural" no matter the nesting.

        Comment


        • #5
          Jan,

          My lathe is a 17 inch sliding bed LeBlond exactly like the last picture. As far as things to watch out for, I only know of one thing beyond the usual wear issues... These lathes are prone to gear dammage if they are shifted while the spindle is still turning. The gear head is really quite strong but poor operation will dammage the gears. Take a couple of screwdrivers with you and pop the top off of the gearbox and look carefully for broken gear teeth. Also, if possible, run the machine and listen for any strange noises... My lathe was built in 1951 and it still sounds smooth and fairly quiet. Also, check all apron controls for smooth operation and movement. If the machine is in any reasonable condition and within your price range you will not be unhappy. Also, what horsepower is the motor? Mine was shipped with 7.5 hp.

          Robin
          Robin

          Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

          Comment


          • #6
            I have used a number of LeBlond lathes. Gems everyone of them. My father was in a Heavy Machine Shop unit at Brookham Common in England, outside Paris and in Okinowa at the end. He has spoken very highly of the LeBlond Sliding Gap lathe that was part of their equipment.

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            • #7
              LeBlond Sliding Bed~Gap lathe.
              I'm not useually a stickler about terms, but . . . .
              Realy ! A sliding gap?

              Comment


              • #8
                hopefully coming weekend...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by rdfeil View Post
                  Jan,

                  My lathe is a 17 inch sliding bed LeBlond exactly like the last picture. As far as things to watch out for, I only know of one thing beyond the usual wear issues... These lathes are prone to gear dammage if they are shifted while the spindle is still turning. The gear head is really quite strong but poor operation will dammage the gears. Take a couple of screwdrivers with you and pop the top off of the gearbox and look carefully for broken gear teeth. Also, if possible, run the machine and listen for any strange noises... My lathe was built in 1951 and it still sounds smooth and fairly quiet. Also, check all apron controls for smooth operation and movement. If the machine is in any reasonable condition and within your price range you will not be unhappy. Also, what horsepower is the motor? Mine was shipped with 7.5 hp.

                  Robin
                  Hi Robin,

                  thanks for the advice.
                  Do you have any idea upon the weight of the lathe?
                  I will probably have to swap motor as it is 110/220 volt according to the owner.
                  Is the speedadjustement by changing the pully width prone to problems?

                  The price is okay, i guess about double the scrap value.

                  cheers jan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kf2qd View Post
                    I have used a number of LeBlond lathes. Gems everyone of them. My father was in a Heavy Machine Shop unit at Brookham Common in England, outside Paris and in Okinowa at the end. He has spoken very highly of the LeBlond Sliding Gap lathe that was part of their equipment.

                    I hope this one turns out to be former us navy/army.
                    It will probably replace my wartime german Kaercher....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Old Hat View Post
                      LeBlond Sliding Bed~Gap lathe.
                      I'm not useually a stickler about terms, but . . . .
                      Realy ! A sliding gap?

                      i didnt invent the term...
                      coming to think about it.
                      normally you would have a gap bed.
                      this gap bed slides.
                      so the term is not that strange after all...

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                      • #12
                        Just Mess'n LoL

                        Cool Lathe, that's all that Matters.

                        You will want to keep input rpm the same, though.
                        If I understood your question.

                        Love that Swivel foot too.
                        bolt 'er down and make chips!
                        I would like to know of that's a "Marine application option"?
                        Last edited by Old Hat; 08-08-2014, 06:19 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Jan,

                          I think that mine weighs in at about 2500 - 3000 pounds. I am not really sure as a friend of mine moved mine with a 20 ton boom truck.
                          I do not know if the speed adjustment is prone to trouble as mine had it removed before I got the lathe . I wish mine still had the feature. My guess would be that the mechanical variable speed pullys would be very reliable. The system uses a spring loaded variable pully and the speed is adjusted by moving the motor, which then causes the belts to rige either deeper or shallower in the V's. The only thing to be careful about is to only adjust the speed wheel when the machine is running. I hope this helps.

                          Robin
                          Robin

                          Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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