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sharpening stone - seen better days

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  • #16
    I use a cheap 'diamond sharpening block' and WD40. Cleans the stone up in no time at all.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

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    • #17
      Most sharpening stones are quite soft (bond, not grit). Another stone works well, but a sheet of 60 grit wet/dry paper on a flat surface, wetted with the liquid of your choice will pull the worn surface off just as well as the hi-tech solutions and is easier to clean up afterwards.
      Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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      • #18
        Originally posted by randm View Post
        Most sharpening stones are quite soft (bond, not grit). Another stone works well, but a sheet of 60 grit wet/dry paper on a flat surface, wetted with the liquid of your choice will pull the worn surface off just as well as the hi-tech solutions and is easier to clean up afterwards.
        That's what I normally do, I have a thick chunk of polished granite from a monument company that I use as a backer. Use water normally to keep it cutting and to hold the paper on the granite. It's also my go-to for touching up edges on chisels and plane irons.

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        • #19
          A classic method for breaking that glaze and flattening the stones is to rub them on a scrap of plate glass sprinkled with silicon carbide grit. Water stones can be lubricated with water or left dry, while oil stones should be lubricated with kerosene or an equivalent solvent during this process. I like to use 80 grit silicon carbide for this job, and if I run out of loose grit, I'll substitute the coarsest silicon grit sanding sheets I have on hand. No need for waterproof paper if I'm using kerosene:



          My impression is that the coarse grits really open up the surface and the stone cuts better than when new.
          Cheers,

          Frank Ford
          HomeShopTech

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          • #20
            I true mine up in the mill using a diamond tile wheel on a homemade arbor.I just clamp the stone in the vise with a sheet of newspaper surrounding it to keep the grit off the machine.

            To surface it,I just run it through the sandblast cabinet.The sandblast removes most of the binder from between the grains and the stone works for a long time without loading after.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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