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Scored some goodies today!

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  • Scored some goodies today!

    I've been working with the bare minimum in tooling for several years. One Chinese dial indicator. One dial caliper. One set of Chinese micrometers. That kind of thing. I just didn't have the money to spare for tooling. I recently did some work for a friend and he gave me an old Starret Last Word indicator set and a Starret inside micrometer set. I was in hog heaven!

    Today, a friend wanted to go to the gun show. You never know what will show up for sale at those things. Beef jerky, roasted almonds, jewelry, trash n trinkets, machine tools, etc. Wait. What was that? Machine tools? Yeah, we paid that table a second visit. After a little small talk between my friend and the seller I walked away with a little bag of goodies for $62.




    The back plunge indicator set was missing the snug and c-clamp but I can make it work with other stuff I have on hand.

  • #2
    Good haul.
    Looks like part of a Starrett 'Last Word' set with some other nice indicators. The metric Hardinge would drive me nuts though. I've never been able to transition to decimal
    mm.

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    • #3
      Great find!
      The indicator set involving the top right indictor is worth double that alone.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
        Good haul.
        Looks like part of a Starrett 'Last Word' set with some other nice indicators. The metric Hardinge would drive me nuts though. I've never been able to transition to decimal
        mm.
        it is 25,4 mm for 1 inch, not a lot of rocket science needed for that
        0,01 mm on the metric scale is roughly 0,00039 inch
        Last edited by spinningwheels; 08-23-2014, 09:29 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by spinningwheels View Post
          it is 25,4 mm for 1 inch, not a lot of rocket science needed for that
          It's the image to mind factor! A sence of scale and resolution.
          I talked to DC 9 pilots when the first digital instruments were put in.
          They hated them to peices, cuz it was just numbers
          devorced from any sence of location in the band of posibillities.

          So they went back to the drawing board and came up with visual representation digital gaging
          so at a glance the Pilot could get a fix on where the reading was in the scale of ho-hum to OH SH!T

          I have to use metric frequently to keep a sence of scaling in mind.
          Last edited by Old Hat; 08-23-2014, 09:33 PM.

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          • #6
            An awful lot of indicator use is just getting the needle to point at the same place..... For that, metric and inch are exactly the same.

            The problem, if any, comes up only if you want to know how MUCH different they are.
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #7
              I´m Dutch so grew up with the metrich system, but as you say it are just numbers, It took me some time to understand the Inch system , but now I can use both

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              • #8
                I can work with the metric system without a problem. Still, the primary use for that indicator will be as a stop (read: repeatable zero) for the apron on the lathe.
                Last edited by feets; 08-24-2014, 02:00 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Old Hat View Post
                  It's the image to mind factor! A sence of scale and resolution.
                  I talked to DC 9 pilots when the first digital instruments were put in.
                  They hated them to peices, cuz it was just numbers
                  devorced from any sence of location in the band of posibillities.

                  So they went back to the drawing board and came up with visual representation digital gaging
                  so at a glance the Pilot could get a fix on where the reading was in the scale of ho-hum to OH SH!T

                  I have to use metric frequently to keep a sence of scaling in mind.
                  This is me, I dislike digital, with analog I can I can see everything at a glance, with digital I have to actually read them. I may not be able to actually see that the temp is up by 3 degrees, but I know it's high. Even the fake analog gauges work are faster to read.

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                  • #10
                    I have an indicator similar to the Hardinge one. I use it in a 3/8 collet in the mill spindle to level out or set an angle on something in the vise.
                    Kansas City area

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                    • #11
                      I can work in either system, but with an English lathe, both of them, a metric drawing requires conversion. Thankfully, the mills have DRO's,so no problem there. Don't think I own a metric dial indicator tho. Bob.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Old Hat View Post
                        It's the image to mind factor! A sense of scale and resolution.
                        Exactly.

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