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Chamfering A Hole From The Inside Out

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  • Chamfering A Hole From The Inside Out

    In finishing up my drill press bore and sleeve job I decided to put an oil port on the side The hole is drilled and threaded 10-24. I made a small extension tube which threads directly into the cyl. wall. I needed to break the edge of the hole on the inside but couldn't reach it by any means I had available to me. So.... I decided to chamfer it from the inside out with a 1/4" ball stone and my Dremel. I cut part of the shank off the stone and epoxied it to the opposite end of the ball. I used my lathe to center it to the ball. I then slipped the shank through the hole and mounted my Dremel to it. It held just long enough to break the edge and then it popped off. I did a repeat of the same procedure in order to get the appropriate chamfer on the edge. Finally...... done. Ready to assemble.

    JL......................







  • #2
    Why did you cut the shank off? Seems it would of worked just as well with the shank it had.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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    • #3
      All kinds of HSS and carbide burrs available to take care of those things, without any modification. And the carbide ones last a LONG time.

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      • #4
        Joe, your stuff is WAY too clean, nice pics tho. Bob.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Black_Moons View Post
          Why did you cut the shank off? Seems it would of worked just as well with the shank it had.
          No, reason being the hole is for a #10 screw. If you look at the factory side of the stone where the shank is cemented in you'll see that the hole in the stone is larger than the hole to be chamfered. I did check the carbide burrs but I was afraid they would be too aggressive and the sleeve wall is only .070 thick. I could easily cut right through it working in such a blind awkward position.

          JL.................

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          • #6
            It took a few readings to understand...

            The short stub is the original shaft, right? And the stone is messed up where the stubby shaft enters the stone, right?

            That leaves you with cutting off the shaft and attaching the longer cut off part to the side of the ball that is completely spherical, right? That let you use what used to be the top of ball to cut the chamfer, right?

            Clever solution.



            Dan
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

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            • #7
              Right.
              Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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              • #8
                Maybe the stone could have been re shaped slightly to use the original shaft. At any rate you achieved what was needed.
                Jim

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                • #9
                  Dan, you are correct in both the way and reason for my fancy modification work. I should have done a better job of describing it.
                  I left just enough of the original shaft on the stone so I could mount it in the chuck when I epoxied the shaft to the other side which is being held in the tail stock chuck. The diameter of the flat spot on the original shank side was larger than the dia. of the hole to be chamfered, there was no way to reshape it, this seemed to be my only option.

                  JL............

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                    No, reason being the hole is for a #10 screw. If you look at the factory side of the stone where the shank is cemented in you'll see that the hole in the stone is larger than the hole to be chamfered. I did check the carbide burrs but I was afraid they would be too aggressive and the sleeve wall is only .070 thick. I could easily cut right through it working in such a blind awkward position.

                    JL.................
                    Ah K, maybe next time how about a carbide burr, hold it in a drill chuck after passing it through (with no drill attached) and twist it by hand?
                    Shouldn't take more then a turn or two to deburr it.
                    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Black_Moons View Post
                      Ah K, maybe next time how about a carbide burr, hold it in a drill chuck after passing it through (with no drill attached) and twist it by hand?
                      Shouldn't take more then a turn or two to deburr it.
                      I have a couple round carbide burrs but the problem is the cutting edges of the flutes don't come close enough to the shank. It sort of the same situation with the stone ball. But I did think of that.

                      JL.................

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