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  • basic lathe question..how many tools?

    this cnc lathe I'm thinking of buying has this as far as tool holding.

    I suppose this is a tool holder post with two positions on it, correct?

    Does that mean I could install two tools simultaneously? I'm not saying use them simultaneously. But I mean have them both installed so they can be used at different points in the operation.

    If so,what would be an example of that? Perhaps tool 1 (perp. to spindle) would be a turning insert and tool 2 (parallel to spindle) would be a boring tool?

    I'm guessing there wouldnt be very much room to use both simultaneously since they are so close together. Or ???

    Has anyone heard of adding a turret to this sort of lathe to have a tool changer capability?

    Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
    Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

  • #2
    You could put a manually indexed 6 or 8 position turret in place of the toolpost and have a stop block in the program after each tool. They have turrets on eBay all the time, even ones for a Hardinge for a few hundred. It would take some doing to automate it though. I doubt if you could have two tools on the toolpost at once except in some very specific conditions.
    Kansas City area

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
      You could put a manually indexed 6 or 8 position turret in place of the toolpost and have a stop block in the program after each tool. They have turrets on eBay all the time, even ones for a Hardinge for a few hundred. It would take some doing to automate it though. I doubt if you could have two tools on the toolpost at once except in some very specific conditions.
      thanks! thats exactly what I needed to know..
      Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
      Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

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      • #4
        Two tool positions--think boring bar (in line a spindle) versus turning tool (perpendicular).

        Another thing to consider would be a gang tooling plate. For smaller diameters you can't beat it. Much faster than a turret, and a lot cheaper. Still useful enough that they're being made in quantity today.

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        • #5
          Yes - gang tooling would be another good option. For that you don't have to stop to change tools.
          Kansas City area

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          • #6
            would gang tooling work out given this cross slide seems to be at a slant? it does seem like there might be some travel..hmm I guess I could look that up

            also, heres the same lathe but with what appears to be a CNC turret add-on..cant read the brand or model though..wonder what it is and how much it goes for

            BTW this lathe is buy it now for $2555 with a best offer option and its in so cal and seller says it works great...weighs 3500lbs. Best I can tell its 7.5hp so youd need to drop say $400 on a phase converter. But as far as the things you could do both for fun and profit its in a whole other league compared to something new from the usual hobby places or even a manual lathe.

            Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
            Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

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            • #7
              That's a lot of machine compared to a Taig or Sherline for the same or a little more.
              Kansas City area

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
                That's a lot of machine compared to a Taig or Sherline for the same or a little more.
                exactly...I think alot of people would enjoy their hard earned dollars if they did a little more exploring in the used market..

                the reality check:

                -most likely not single phase...but for smaller machines there is a possibility of finding single phase industrial equipment, and for some machines like this one a phase converter adds several hundred dollars to the cost but its still a deal

                -transporting is not cheap long distance...so stuff like this needs to be close by. the seller of this lathe says he can deliver and unload for $500, 90 miles

                -you should be ready to get your hands dirty and fix whatever might need fixing, but its more of a prepare for the worst kind of thing..unless you are buying something that looks thrashed beyond belief most likely you can do whatever it needs to get it working

                the rewards of having an industrial machine with all its capabilities and specifications at your disposal is worth the effort of patience and complexity of getting it IMO..you can really let your imagination soar. Plus with used machines the value probably goes up once you get it cleaned up and proven to be working..whereas new hobbyist stuff pretty much goes straight down in value the instant you receive it.
                Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
                Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

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                • #9
                  I think that is a realistic evaluation. Sounds right to me.
                  Kansas City area

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                  • #10
                    If it is 3 phase, check the requirements. A friend bought a new industrial 3 phase CNC lathe in about 1981. Got it home and wired it up to a phase converter next to his other 3 phase manual machines. When he hit the go button the phase converter stopped instantly. Nothing he could find would run it off a normal 100 amp single phase service so he ended up having to rent a new shop with 3 phase power. He now has a large shop with a dozen or so similar machines so it was a good move in the long run.

                    Brian

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                    • #11
                      A large enough (and good enough) phase converter should be able to handle the start-up current under full voltage locked rotor conditions, but one could also implement a soft-start controller or a VFD to ramp up to speed without tripping out an overload or stalling. Another "trick" is to have another, lightly loaded, three phase motor on the same three phase line, and its rotational inertia can provide the starting current.
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

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