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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Here is my moisture trap set up. I heard some one mention radiator in a previous post......... OK I'll call it a radiator. It's actually a condenser coil from a large room air conditioner. There is about 50 ft of line in that core. It gives the air plenty of time to cool and the moisture to condence. Every drop is caught in the trap at the end of the coil. I've never had a drop of moisture in any of my regulators that are mounted around the shop.

    JL............

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    This has been discussed before. I suggest you search the archives.

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  • jdunmyer
    replied
    I have a 5Hp Gardner-Denver compressor, about 20 CFM, piece of hydraulic hose feeding into 2, 10' lengths of 3/4" pipe with fins. This is all sloped to the 30-gallon reservoir, an old riveted side-arm water heater tank. Inlet is near the bottom of the tank, discharge is at the very top, going through a water separator that is 3/4" pipe size. That feeds all the piping in the building.

    Although most drops have a drip leg with drain cock, I get little water in them. The key is to cool the air as it exits the compressor, then let the condensate drop out in the tank. If you need even better moisture removal, I'd go with an additional heat exchanger cooled with ice, feeding another moisture trap, especially if your use is "occasional".

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  • vpt
    replied
    Would it be ok to stick the radiator over the cooling fan for the compressor?

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  • velocette
    replied
    Hi
    One of my jobs was servicing and maintenance of a couple of 90 hp compressors
    The factory the air supply through after coolers was kept to 3 degrees Celsius from a chilled water supply for the factory air conditioning.
    With adequate separator traps water in the compressed air supply was never a problem.
    Yes it is way over the top for a home workshop however the only way to adequately trap the water is to cool as much as possible before the storage tanks and suitable water traps.
    Be aware that the higher the pressure the more it will cost to achieve. No point in running at 100 PSI if you only use a tool that only requires 20 psi. Use the biggest storage tanks as possible.
    Eric

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  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Did you say you do not run your plasma much ?
    If you don't want to invest in a radiator or other system due to limited funds, do this
    Put a skirt or collar around your receiver tank and have some ice blocks made to fit it. then just make ice in your freezer ahead of time.
    Drop them in before running and the tank will take most or all the water out.
    Probably the cheapest way to dry air...until you run out of ice

    Rich

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  • vpt
    replied
    Originally posted by Plain ol Bill View Post
    Here is a good suggestion. I made one similar to it and absolutely love it.
    http://www.plasmaspider.com/viewtopi...p=58687#p58687


    I am interested in something like this. There are times I could take a shower with my air hose.

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  • Mike Amick
    replied
    Originally posted by Royldean View Post
    67% more air in reserves? Less compressor cycling?

    [edit] oh, and the "expansion cooling" drying methods won't work if there is no regulator?
    I actually have mine set similarly, just seeing yours in writing made me think.

    This does pose another question or Mod ... Its annoying when I go to fill up my portable tank
    and I can only get it up to 90 when I know there is like 140 at the compressor. I use if for my nail gun
    and if I could get it up to 125 or so .. I could nail longer. Maybe there ought to be a tap before
    the regulator just for this purpose.

    Mike A

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  • Plain ol Bill
    replied
    Here is a good suggestion. I made one similar to it and absolutely love it.
    http://www.plasmaspider.com/viewtopi...p=58687#p58687

    Leave a comment:


  • darryl
    replied
    Not an experts opinion- just thinking out loud here. I always have thought that when the compressed air coming off the pump goes into the tank, it takes the heat of compression with it. I think this should be removed before it goes into the tank. That would mean that the 'hot' line should be cooled and the moisture condensed out before the compressed air enters the tank. It might get to be a plumbing nightmare, but I like the idea of having a cold water line entering a tank which contains a heat-exchanger network of copper tubing through which the compressed air goes. A 'moisture catch' and drain valve would be integral with this, and the cold water entering the tank would go on to the buildings' systems- toilets, etc. Everytime water ran for a toilet flush, hand washing, etc, the coolness in this cooling tank would be refreshed. You might even have a temperature sensitive valve that would flush a few gallons through if the tank temperature rose above some certain temperature. This might be required if you're running the compressor a lot and not using water during that time.

    On the other hand, you could have a cycling loop where you don't waste the water- instead you cycle it through the loop and the heat dissipates into the room air from the loop.

    In any event, past this initial stage of air drying, you would still use the standard filters in various places, and use drop loops with their own drain valves.

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  • Bob Fisher
    replied
    I don't believe it was mentioned, but if you can, take the air off the top of the pipe by means of an upside down "U". Let gravity be your friend. Bob.

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  • Royldean
    replied
    Originally posted by mikeamick View Post
    Just curious .. why run your compressor at 150 if your max needs are 90.
    67% more air in reserves? Less compressor cycling?

    [edit] oh, and the "expansion cooling" drying methods won't work if there is no regulator?

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelP
    replied
    I run a 5hp Quincy followed by a pressure regulator(down to 90psi)/filter and a 40'-long zig-zaged copper pipe radiator. This alone gives me a very dry air in the moisture laden WI woods. However, being anal retentive, I installed dropdowns with drain valves in every branch along with a proper pitching of all distribution lines, automatic tank drain and large desiccant dryer (a lowly Harbour Freight product). It's installed at the outlet feeding my sandblaster and plasma. Both of those also have their own regulators with filters.

    But, again, I have never seen any accumulation of moisture after the radiator run (besides its own drain, of course). My gut feeling is that a 20'-long radiator would be sufficient (especially, if made out of larger diameter pipes).
    Last edited by MichaelP; 10-02-2014, 01:00 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeFin
    replied
    Treating the air / removing moisture before it goes into the Air lines of your shop is your best option. Eleminates the possibility of creating rust/contaminates in your system. Could be as simple as 1/2" soft stainless steel line coiled into a bucket of water or as costly as the refrigeration/heater type dryers.


    I agree Desiccant dryers with changeable canisters are your best option.

    Followed up by a simple separator/filter at the outlet and you should be in good shape

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Amick
    replied
    Originally posted by jlevie View Post
    I find it best to have a regulator (set at 90psi) between the tank and the air lines. I also have a filter/separator between the regulator and the lines. The expansion from tank pressure (150psi) to line pressure condenses a good bit of water out.
    Just curious .. why run your compressor at 150 if your max needs are 90.

    Mike A

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