Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT: Waste veg oil scrap melter fail

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OT: Waste veg oil scrap melter fail

    One of the Australian members of a biodiesel board I frequent decided to melt down some scrap with one of his home built burners in a shoddy home built furnace... This guy needs a proper crucible..
    I was amazed at how quickly it got hot enough to melt the bricks.
    Its a bit boring but I am sure some of you will be amused.
    Cheers,
    Jon

  • #2
    The melting points of :

    Aluminum - 1080 Deg. F

    Steel - 2750 Deg. F

    The temperature of burning fuel oil in air - 3820 deg. F

    Need any more be said?
    Last edited by BigBoy1; 10-10-2014, 09:18 AM. Reason: Typo!
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm just glad to see that he didn't get hurt.

      Brian
      OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

      THINK HARDER

      BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

      MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

      Comment


      • #4
        Need any more be said?
        How about the melting point of brick?
        Cheers,
        Jon

        Comment


        • #5
          It was rather hard to see clearly, but I don't think the brick actually melted. According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grog_%28clay%29 the melting point is 3240F, so the flame could be hot enough. The firing temperature of ordinary bricks is about 2372F (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brick). This gives melting points for various types:
          http://www.answers.com/Q/What_temperature_melts_brick

          Silica firebricks used in steel-melting furnaces can withstand 3000 F:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_brick
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

          Paul: www.peschoen.com
          P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
          and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Molten aluminium will dissolve steel quite effectively - this would thin his crucible progressively until what happened happened !

            Comment


            • #7
              Well spotted, also in steel making ladles and such there are loads of different bricks, cast able concretes and all sort, you can bearly pick up a magnesite brick, silica ones are light, but interestingly the brick rarely ever melts, it is soluable in steel, very soluable in slag, particularly if the slag goes acidic due to phosphorous, or phos pentoxide P205, making the slag Basic was the key to steel making brick survival.
              I'm glad he didn't get hurt
              Mark

              Comment


              • #8
                The bricks are just ordinary house bricks as well , these will start to melt at around 1100 centigrade and do eventually start to slump at 1150-1200 centigrade.

                He is lucky those bricks didnt just fall apart.

                I would have sat the melting pot up out of the direct flame as well . aluminium will melt ok if the container is about 1/2 thick .

                Just a lucky back yarder, hope he learnt something.

                Michael

                Comment


                • #9
                  Mike
                  I hope we ALL learned something
                  George from Conyers Ga.
                  Remember
                  The early bird gets the worm, BUT it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'd agree that he's definitely lucky. Aluminum can be rather nasty in that when it spatters it sticks to flesh like tar and continues to burn until it cools, pouring iron is somewhat safer bc of that aspect.
                    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Seems a bit thin, the steel "container" does..... And it looks very blistered and so forth. Possibly the heat was considerably more than needed for the purpose, and teh temp pretty high.

                      I read a report on a commercial operation that had something similar happen. They didn't heat quite so hot, but the steel apparently had a substantial rusty defect rolled into it.

                      The report suggested that the aluminum hit the rust and the combo turned into thermite, rapidly heating and burning through the rest of the steel. Seemed reasonable, although I suspect it may have needed more rust than may have been present. The remaining steel around the hole was fairly thick still, might have been really what happened.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Reminded me of the China syndrome !
                        Mark

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Very impressive!! I had no idea bunk veg oil could produce that much btu. I love the dual air pumps. Thats what allows the hot burn.

                          Good for him. He has a hot source, thats usually the issue. Not him Plenty of heat. Now he will work on the oven and the crucibles.

                          I have seen some melted though. What caught my attention was the use of "tramp" oil. Like from an eatery. Veg oil. Good use. JR
                          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yep, he used to have one that he made from a vacuum that looked like it worked really well at melting his scrap too.
                            Lots of energy in waste veg oil (WVO) I convert it into biodiesel and it heats my house, shop and powers my Duramax truck, Kubota tractor and cummins powered zoomboom! The only problem is finding enough of it...
                            Cheers,
                            Jon

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Looks like an interesting way to create a furnace.

                              If the fuel was safely stored and delivered to the air stream (I could not see the actual design of that part) then this could have heaps of uses.

                              Anyone have a link to a design?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X