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any reason to keep two 1" micrometers?

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  • any reason to keep two 1" micrometers?

    I have a harbor fail 1" electronic micrometer, and a 1" lufkin. I got the lufkin basically free. But I'm selling my sherline lathe, and I'd like to include the lufkin to sweeten the deal.

    I just want to make sure there is no reason I would want to keep two 1" micrometers. Besides backup/redundancy. Is there some special thing you can do with two micrometers of the same size? Some kind of differential measurement or who knows what?

    HELP!!!!!!!!!!()*@(!*@)!(*@)!

    Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
    Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

  • #2
    G clamps often come in pairs......................
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      Well, a man with one watch always knows what time it is, and a man with 2 is never sure. Do you know which is more accurate over the range?

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      • #4
        Keep the Lufkin, toss the electronic in with the lathe. The Lufkin will not need new batteries just when you need it. It is probably more accurate as well. Bob.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by achtanelion View Post
          Well, a man with one watch always knows what time it is, and a man with 2 is never sure. Do you know which is more accurate over the range?
          I really hope its the harbor fart one..the lufkin doesnt even read tenths and its probably 70 years old...but I dont have any thing precise enough to prove it either way..one things for sure, id rather use the HF one because its brand new and it reads much finer than the lufkin..
          Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
          Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bob Fisher View Post
            Keep the Lufkin, toss the electronic in with the lathe. The Lufkin will not need new batteries just when you need it. It is probably more accurate as well. Bob.

            Nah...


            "This should be obvious. I also know what is pretty much required when it comes to showing your inspection tools to your clients - but.. I needed a new pair of micrometers to help me measure taper in my lathe. I'm low on cash right now (bought CNC lathe, ancilliary equipment, tooling, starrett machinist's level, etc.) and need to keep the spend low. So, after looking at the mitutoyo's that I actually want for about $280 at grainger, I went and bought the $35 pittsburgh digital micrometer with a 20% off coupon at harbor freight and made my measurements.

            At my 'real' job / day job we have tons of mitutoyo's which are calibrated. I took some time to have a look at the super cheapo's vs. mitutoyo's best with calibration certs that are due in 2014.

            I did two tests: 1.) origin repeatability, 2.) variation between micrometers' measurements on my test parts. The data that I took is attached.

            Digital micrometer evaluation 01.txt

            This is a tab delimited text file which can be opened in excel.


            The result is pretty interesting. As far as I can tell the pittsburgh is the best instrument for repeatability and accuracy. precision on all three are identical (0.00005")

            The pittsburgh repeats it's origin within -0.00001" over 10 attempts. The most expensive coolant proof calibrated mitutoyo repeats within +0.00004" in 10 attempts.

            On the second type of measurement, the pittsburgh always ended up closest to the average of the measurments - within -0.00004", while the most expensive mitutoyo ended up within -0.00012"

            We're splitting less than hairs here (literally) but this really speaks to the capability of cheapo chinese manufacuters. And so what if it isn't coolant proof. I can buy 10 pairs of pittsburghs for the price of 1 coolant proof mitutoyo.


            I don't want to rag on mitutoyo here - their build quality is far superior - but the data says that thier measuring capability on calibrated micrometers is actually not, and for 10x the price.

            I will likely buy a pair of mitutoyos as soon as I can afford them none the less... Thought this was pretty entertaining though.
            "
            http://www.cnczone.com/forums/genera...ml#post1252504

            But anyways..I take It that there is nothing useful to do with two 1" micrometers? Because thats the original question. Can we save the "i hate electronics" luddite stuff for another thread please...
            Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
            Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

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            • #7
              The way my calipers go through batteries would encourage me to keep the Lufkin around in case the battery was dead in the HF micrometer.

              Just as a side comment, I have been very surprised how accurate my HF digital micrometer has been. Occasionally I double check it against a random gauge block and it has been spot on. I dread the day it gets dropped on the concrete floor.

              Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk
              CRP-4848 CNC Router, CNC G0463 (Sieg X3) Mill, G4000 9x19 Lathe, HF 9x19 Lathe
              N5FPP Amateur Radio

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Analias View Post
                The way my calipers go through batteries would encourage me to keep the Lufkin around in case the battery was dead in the HF micrometer.

                Just as a side comment, I have been very surprised how accurate my HF digital micrometer has been. Occasionally I double check it against a random gauge block and it has been spot on. I dread the day it gets dropped on the concrete floor.

                Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk
                Yeah me too..I know it will eventually happen. But I have lots of 20% off coupons and they are only $30 new I think so lol...
                Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
                Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

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                • #9
                  Keep them both. As mentioned above, when the Horror Frieght fails the Lufkin will be working. Also, what if you drop one and it hits the floor hard at the wrong angle? Atleast you will have another one in reserve. Another thing to consider is that the Lufkin will be able to get into a tighter spot near a machine spindle/chuck due to it's smaller size.

                  It's not much of a sweetener for the lathe sale and you already own both of them. I'd keep them both.

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                  • #10
                    Sounds like you have already answered your original question to me.Bob.

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                    • #11
                      I'd toss 'em both in with the Sherline, a novice will get all exited about that. Otherwise they're worthless, the Lufkin is about $5 on ebay and the HF less. After you sell the Sherline get a decent electronic micrometer, Fowler if money is tight, otherwise Mitutoyo.
                      Gary


                      Appearance is Everything...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by goose View Post
                        I'd toss 'em both in with the Sherline, a novice will get all exited about that. Otherwise they're worthless, the Lufkin is about $5 on ebay and the HF less. After you sell the Sherline get a decent electronic micrometer, Fowler if money is tight, otherwise Mitutoyo.
                        Looks like the harbor freight one beats the Mitutoyo for measurements..what data are you citing to say the Mitutoyo would be preferred?

                        http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...103#post942103
                        Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
                        Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

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                        • #13
                          Only 2? I must have a dozen... One lives with the mill, one with the lathe, and my favorite safe on the workbench for final inspection.

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                          • #14
                            If the Lufkin is NOT a tenths one. give it away with the other lathe, if you must. I'd keep the Sherline if possible, the two cover different size ranges, and the Sherline will be better for really small stuff.

                            Yeah, I know all about the idea of making tiny stuff on big lathes being easier than the reverse..... Whatever.... You go ahead and make a 0.25 mm pivot on a 10" Atlas and I hope you enjoy the experience.

                            But. back to the mics. A tool steel Lufkin like that isn't worth much, goose has a point. The tenths type (0.001 plus vernier) with carbide faces, which I think have a "V" suffix, are nicer than any Starrett I have ever used.

                            But, The HF one will be dead (battery, old age, phase of moon) just when you want it someday. Don't have that be your only one. HF is not nearly as bad as it was, although they seem to have also changed vendors recently, and may be cheaper-made now.


                            Myself, for "digital" stuff, I have one digital caliper, might have come from HF, probably paid 2 bucks for it. I keep it at work for the rubes to use. Everything else is a regular analog type, except for some of the metric ones, which I picked up for a song, and this cool old Slocomb ball-ended "Speedmic". The speedmic and the metric are mechanical digital, not electronic.



                            Before you call me a Luddite, my work is electronics, motor drives. VFD design, and various MIL stuff. I just know way too much about cheap electronics...... Spent 28 years in consumer electronics.
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 10-12-2014, 01:27 PM.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              If the Lufkin is NOT a tenths one. give it away with the other lathe, if you must. I'd keep the Sherline if possible, the two cover different size ranges, and the Sherline will be better for really small stuff.

                              Yeah, I know all about the idea of making tiny stuff on big lathes being easier than the reverse..... Whatever.... You go ahead and make a 0.25 mm pivot on a 10" Atlas and I hope you enjoy the experience.

                              But. back to the mics. A tool steel Lufkin like that isn't worth much, goose has a point. The tenths type (0.001 plus vernier) with carbide faces, which I think have a "V" suffix, are nicer than any Starrett I have ever used.

                              But, The HF one will be dead (battery, old age, phase of moon) just when you want it someday. Don't have that be your only one. HF is not nearly as bad as it was, although they seem to have also changed vendors recently, and may be cheaper-made now.


                              Myself, for "digital" stuff, I have one digital caliper, might have come from HF, probably paid 2 bucks for it. I keep it at work for the rubes to use. Everything else is a regular analog type, except for some of the metric ones, which I picked up for a song, and this cool old Slocomb ball-ended "Speedmic". The speedmic and the metric are mechanical digital, not electronic.

                              Before you call me a Luddite, my work is electronics, motor drives. VFD design, and various MIL stuff. I just know way too much about cheap electronics...... Spent 28 years in consumer electronics.
                              Not to change the subject, but you have an Atlas right? I keep forgetting who does and who doesn't. Do you use collets for workholding on the Atlas? Im not doubting what you are saying about small work being more difficult on the Atlas, but can you elaborate a bit about why?

                              Also, I promised myself I could only buy the Atlas if I sold the Sherline...so I gotta sell it. If I stop following my own rules about machinery acquisition...well...things wont go well around here and I'll end up buried in rusty filthy metal objects, glued to a toilet seat with a laptop open to homeshopmachinist
                              Hobbyist: someone who makes something sound harder than it is.
                              Professional: someone who cant afford to be a hobbyist.

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