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  • Tube cutting

    I have to cut 100 pieces of 304 stainless tube of one inch diameter. I need the ends to be perfectly clean and have been doing it on a bandsaw and then cleaning the ends with a face cut in the lathe. I tried my cut off saw and its much quicker but leaves a huge burr. Any suggestions on how to speed up my process? Can I maybe use a carbide blade or something?I am wondering if I could maybe stack a few in my bandsaw to do more at a time but am not sure how to clamp them down.

  • #2
    How long is each piece before you cut them up and how long are the finished pieces?
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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    • #3
      They need to be 110mm long. I have been cutting them 112mm long and facing both sides to get the finished size. I also have to cut 100 pieces of 6mm wide.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by plunger View Post
        They need to be 110mm long. I have been cutting them 112mm long and facing both sides to get the finished size. I also have to cut 100 pieces of 6mm wide.
        How long is the raw material? Why couldn't you just part them off in the lathe?
        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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        • #5
          I tried this but I struggled with it.Maybe if I had a quality carbide parting tool but I only have hss parting tool and it gets buggered real quick

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          • #6
            I recently made a batch of several dozen 1/4" diameter aluminum pins. I saw cut them to length. Then, prior to de-burring I used a milling cutter shrouded in a shop made, OD sized guide to flatten the ends of the saw cut pins. I used it in a hand held, battery powered drill and the work went quickly.



            For your 1" tubing I would try a hand held sanding block or a file, with the tube mounted in the lathe.

            Then I used one of these to de-burr the edges:



            http://www.jbind.com/products/produc...px?SKU=RT11006

            It works well for removing burrs. One side for ID and a quick flip to the other for the OD. Can be used manually or with lathe or drill press. I did my pins in the drill press, but for 1" tubing I would try the lathe. Hand held may be faster.

            If you are really ambitious, you could use a block/cylinder of aluminum and bore a blind, 1" (+?), hole to match your OD. Then mount three cutters (HSS, carbide) in it at the proper positions and angles to clean up the saw cut edge. Mount that tool in the lathe and feed the stock into it by hand. If there is a chance of this being a repeat job, I would definitely do it this way.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              How good does the end need to be? I just did 350 pcs originally spec'd at 12.4 OD, 8.4 ID and 3.0 length. After a consultation with the customer, we ordered some metric tubing, 12 OD X 8.2 ID and parted them off on a cold saw. Cleaned the burr off on a sander, job done in a day. Sometimes it pays to see if the tolerances are really required for the end use. Bob.

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              • #8
                but turn the tube not the tool?
                Andy

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                • #9
                  The bottom gets a plug put on, the top I tig weld a handle on and needs to look well finished.I tried a tube cutter but it mauled the tube aesthetically

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                  • #10
                    In a past life as it were, making bits for aircraft, a block was machined, ie bored out to fit the tube, this block was then fixed to the table of the saw, the saw was then used to cut nearly all the way through the block and withdrawn.
                    In use the tube was slid through the block to a dead stop and the tube cut, no burrs, nice clean cut.
                    Some funny alloys worked even better when refrigerated first
                    Mark

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                    • #11
                      just a thought...

                      Make a lathe tool holder which will hold a hack-saw blade vertically.

                      Plunge in with the X axis with hacksaw blade, then change over to facing tool if finish not acceptable.
                      Its possible that you might just have to hit the part with a file and not even use a facing tool at all.

                      Should be much quicker then band saw even if you use the same "speeds and feeds" because cutting it on the lathe like this you are only moving/cutting the tubing thickness unlike with the band saw you are moving/cutting the tubings diameter.

                      You could set a stop with the tail-stock or use the tool post or what ever.

                      * It was asked before, how long is the tubing lengths when you start with them ?
                      ~ What was once an Opinion, became a Fact, to be later proven Wrong ~
                      http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com
                      https://www.youtube.com/user/thisisjusthowidoit

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                      • #12
                        Wish I had thought of that , Boslab. Would have saved the sanding operation. I will, however, file it for future reference. Thanks, Bob"

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                        • #13
                          Spend to get a good parting tool, then something from these folks in the tailstock

                          http://www.severancetool.com/2764/index.html

                          "tube deburring"

                          it will still be a bit of a hassle because there are two ends but if the parting tool is set up well/correct it may come pretty close to being finished just parting...

                          Don't know that saw cut and debur with same tool (from Severance) will end up being any faster or neater than parting and debur.

                          IF the parts are long enough, you could set up the debur tool and feed the tube in by hand (would speed up compared to chuck and unchuck in the lathe unless you had some sort of air/hydraulic auto chuck set up).

                          To me, with that number, you want to get as close to automation as you can...saw cut, clamp tube, debur tool at each end at the same time idea (lever to actuate)
                          Last edited by RussZHC; 10-15-2014, 08:44 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Plunger buy a carbide insert parting blade and inserts. I think you are getting paid to do this job so invest in some tooling.
                            How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                            • #15
                              The tubes start as six meter lengths. I can cut them to any size and cut them shorter to make handling easier. Black forest my parting tool just goes red hot on this stuff. Its real tuff material. Is there a vast difference between an insert type parting tool and hss? .I really cr*p myself while doing parting.

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