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  • How to mask a lathe

    I am still contemplating spraying my lathe sometime later this year.
    I have hesitated to date as I wanted to think seriously about this as the masking would pose the biggest problem. The saddle area would be the worse to mask then getting paint in between the bed up and under. I wonder if the saddle would need to be removed in which case I would not proceed as this is not a simple job not a little uncomplicated lathe the removal of the saddle would be a big job but I think it can be done without this any ideas I asked before but never really got the best way if doing this someone out there has to have done it before on a complicated lathe I have myself on a southbend (uk version.Boxford )I want to make a nice job of it and have done some spraying before but nothing as challenging as this if it were just the lathe or any other machine it would not be so bad but the saddle area is the biggy in terms of thinking it out before hand, please don't write telling me to leave it alone I already know of that option and may resort to it but would rather not if I can help it.Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  • #2
    alistair,
    my lathe is pretty old and the surface finish is poor so whenever i've had to paint it i've used a brush and/or small rollers.

    i do do alot of spraying however and you might find that rubber cement will be the easiest way to mask all the small intricate parts. take off all the easy stuff first of course.. slide/compound, handles, etc.

    there are professional 'liquid masks' but rubber cement (from any hobby store) does a good job for me. paint it on, let it dry, spray to your heart's content, then peel it off.

    i'd suggest an epoxy paint with catalyst. it'll cost a bit more, but well worth it. some of the paints i've come across do not hold up well to oilbased coolants. in addition the epoxy paints are so damn tough it'll be a long time before you see the scratches come back.

    try just the saddle first, since that might pose the biggest challenge. don't bother masking the whole thing until you see the results. use a dropclothe or towel, of course, to guard against overspray.

    good luck, & post pictures!
    -tony

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    • #3
      Tony strangely I asked aboutTrimite paint they were very helpful, and suggested maybe a paint that would be easily sprayable and also be able to give good results with a brush or roller.
      So I may finally go for a combination aproach.
      I have just done my new small Fritz Werner milling machine and will post pictures of that soon I never realised how beautiful a small machine this was despite being reasured by many friends, but I looked at it today after it was painted and began to realise how well made it is.
      It's really a little beauty thanks Tony will keep you posted Alistair ps any more help keep em coming
      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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      • #4
        Alistair..

        I used lots of vaseline on my mill.. Just gooped it on where I didn't want the paint to stick. I must have done alright. I masked off with butchers paper the plexiglass and filters, other items I could.

        Use vaseline on the tags, legend plates and tape over them with the brown masking tape. It makes them come off easier, no goo.

        It is a pain shooting paint on something with so many critical parts that paint can mess up. Get paint in a way, a felt wiper can be ruined, a screw can be gummed up. Lots of things to look out for.

        Use a resprirator, not a dust mask. That is the most important thing. The machine can be replaced.

        David

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        • #5
          Alistair,
          Have a read of the notes on the Raglan lathe at the bottom of this page.

          http://www.lathes.co.uk/raglan/

          Both Raglan and Myfords used/ use Trimite paint on their machines.

          John S.
          .

          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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          • #6
            Alistair,

            How big is your lathe? I have an 11" Logan and I have taken off the saddle a few times to clean out the cast iron chips from turning backplates. Dropping the apron is pretty simple (on mine).
            Disassembly may be a pain in the butt, however you can inspect, clean and paint a lot easier. Besides, we all like to play with machinery, so taking stuff apart and putting it together is part of the fun - Just so long as you don't lose any parts

            Good luck whatever you decide.

            Alex
            Alex

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            • #7
              It's probably a good idea to take it apart as much as you can. Here are some pictures of my lathe in progress, the blue is masking tape, some show the red primer, some the finish gray.
              <A HREF="http://img1.photobucket.com/albums/0903/Sprocket/DSCN0373.jpg" TARGET=_blank>
              photobucket.com/albums/0903/Sprocket/DSCN0380.jpg
              &lt;A HREF="http://img1.photobucket.com/albums</A>" TARGET=_blank&gt;http://img1.photobucket.com/albums[/URL]&lt;/A&gt;
              http://img1.photobucket.com/albums/0...t/DSCN0330.jpg
              http://img1.photobucket.com/albums/0...t/DSCN0373.jpg
              I like to put masking tape on, then trim with a file or sandpaper- it makes a very clean edge, and you really have to try to file too much. You just file as though you were deburring a corner, but only go through the masking tape. As with most jobs, prep is more work than the painting itself, but definitely worth the time. The saddle and apron are in the first two pictures. It isn't that difficult to get them off.

              [This message has been edited by Sprocket (edited 05-23-2004).]

              [This message has been edited by Sprocket (edited 05-23-2004).]

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              • #8
                I mask leadscrews, hoses, and other crevised and convoluted parts with aluminum foil.

                Ways may be coated with grease as a maskant.

                Lead screws and power shafts remove fairly easily in more modern machines where they're socketed into keyed couplings instead of passing through the quick change box or whatever. If you can remove lead screws and poers hafts conveniently for painting it makes sense to do so. Pre-painting before assembly is imminiently sensible minimizing masking.

                I suggest brush painting any machine tool smaller than a freight car. Who cares about a glistening paint job on a machine tool where paint life in the chip wash can be measured in days?

                It's a machine tool not an article of furniture.

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                • #9
                  Here are pics of the lathe the trouble with this lathe is there is an automatic oild feed to the bed and ways as stated in the handbook i.e the apron has it's own lubrication system by pump from a resorvior in the base of the casting and an oil level indicator is located on the right hand end so that kind of worries me abit but this is one beautiful lathe Smart and Brown 10 24 -vsl flat head model here are pics
                  regards Alistair
                  http://www.photobucket.com/albums/09...athe/?start=20


                  Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                  • #10
                    Good God man use it, don't damn well polish it.
                    What's wrong with that machine?, no way that needs a repaint.

                    It says Smart and Brown on the headstock not Cistine Chapel, or in the famous words of one of the saints:-
                    "You want [email protected]#~=+g what painting on the ceiling ??"

                    By the time you finish getting everything painted up you'll be too old and knackered to use them.
                    Find a project and go with it man.

                    John S.
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                    • #11
                      I'm with John. I still have my Briggs and Stratton lawn mower from near on 30 years ago. It still runs. In fact, I have to go prove that in a few minutes. I clean the mower deck every year with a pressure washer and then paint it with whatever left over spray bomb paint that is laying around. The standing joke with my kids (all grown now) is "What color is the lawn mower this year Dad?"
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        as originally stated in my question
                        please don't write telling me to leave it alone I already know of that option and may resort to it but would rather not if I can help it.Alistair
                        Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Evan c'mon you can't seriously compare a dull uninteresting thing like a lawnmower with a beautiful Smart and brown lathe.Or in other words I dont geeeve a sheeet about my lawnmower (which I bought new last year)and cannot even tell you what colour it is.We are talking about one of the loves of my life Alistair
                          Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                          • #14
                            Alistair,
                            That is one sweet looking lathe!
                            I can see why you would want to paint it up nicely- But when it's wearing a new coat of smooth pretty paint you aren't going to want to scratch it up with nasty little metal chips

                            I do like Forrest's idea about using foil to mask with. I suppose you could remove the small stuff and paint the saddle on the lathe.

                            But if you can't bring yourself to let the new paint-job get all scratched and chipped from use, you could always buy another lathe to use while you just look at this one

                            Alex
                            Alex

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                            • #15
                              boy that is a nice looking machine.I never heard of those before.Lokks well built. Enjoy it. Jim

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