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How do you turn something like this shape?

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  • How do you turn something like this shape?

    How do you turn a free form shape like this on a lathe?

    (not the thread section, the curved handle part)

    I'd like to make a couple of new handles for my lathe.




  • #2
    Your image isn't showing up.
    Kevin

    More tools than sense.

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    • #3
      ....................deleted.

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      • #4
        Assume you're talking about a ball crank. I've done them "free hand" simple work the carriage and cross site at the same time and whittle away at it. I've wanted to make a template tracing tool for the South Bend Heavy 10 but I'd never got around to it.

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        • #5
          JimDobson, you tried to link an image attachment from another forum, people need to be a member of that other forum to view the image, your image will not show here.

          The handle looks like a squirrel tail or a stretched egg-ish, sorry dont know the name of this style.
          If 'you/anyone' wants to see the pic, you can look at the source page of this thread and then follow the link to another forum.

          [edit]
          Personaly im not sure how to make a shape like that with a manul unless you use a tracer attachment or do some angles with the compound, then some form/radius tools and alittle blending by hand. Or something with a pivoting radius/ball making tool along with angles and hand blending.

          _
          Last edited by iMisspell; 10-19-2014, 08:32 PM.
          ~ What was once an Opinion, became a Fact, to be later proven Wrong ~
          http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com
          https://www.youtube.com/user/thisisjusthowidoit

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          • #6
            Without a profile/tracing attachment ( like a taper attachment but following a template, not a straight bar), you're left with manually following the curve by simultaneous cross and carriage feed, or a profiled skiving tool?
            Rules are for the obedience of fools, and the guidance of wise men.

            Holbrook Model C Number 13 lathe, Testa 2U universal mill, bikes and tools

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            • #7
              I made a plumb bob and did some free hand turning. It was brass which was a bit easier, but getting the coordination of feeds right took a little bit. I have a video on my youtube page showing me do it, look for the plumb bob.
              Steve

              My youtube:
              http://www.youtube.com/MyShopNotes

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              • #8
                ...
                Last edited by oldtiffie; 10-19-2014, 09:01 PM.

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                • #9
                  Use a graver.

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                  • #10
                    Using my imagination a bit... I think you ought to be able to do it by determining the diameter, say, every 0.1", then stepping along the piece cutting the correct diameter for that position. You'll end up with an uneven surface, of course, that would then have to be evened out with a file.
                    ----------
                    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
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                    • #11
                      I can't see your illustration, but am imagining some kind of handle with a curved shape, perhaps an "S" curve. Many shapes can start by roughing them out with straight cuts and some tapers using the compound. Turn the largest diameter first. Then rough out the low spots to somewhere near their final diameter. Then run a taper down to that low point, again a bit larger then the final size. Round out that taper with another one at one or both ends. Perhaps so again at all the high spots, perhaps four or more of them at this point.

                      Then, when it seems that the tapers will be more trouble than they are worth, take a file and work by hand. A flat file for the convex parts and a round file for the concave ones.

                      When you are within a thousandth or so of your desired profile, start with sandpaper strips, perhaps 1" wide. Start with a 100 or 150 grit and use a little oil or cutting fluid. Kick the lathe speed up, perhaps to the max. Work on it "shoe shine" fashion. When it is just about on size start with finer grades of sandpaper, again with oil or cutting fluid. Work down to a grade that gives the finish you want. With 2000x or finer, you should be able to get a mirror finish or you can stop before that if you like.

                      If it is a ball handle, you may want to use a ball turning attachment for the balls.
                      Paul A.

                      Make it fit.
                      You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                      • #12
                        Does the handle look like any of these? If so copy the link and post it.

                        http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...3-13&sp=-1&sk=

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dp View Post
                          Does the handle look like any of these? If so copy the link and post it.

                          http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...3-13&sp=-1&sk=
                          I can't see the OP's image either so I will use the "images" of machine handles on "Google".

                          http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...3-13&sp=-1&sk=

                          These were included in compulsory pre-Apprentice-ship work - rough forming as usual and "form-tooling" with the end of a file and used and supported in a manner similar to using a Wood-Turners lathe.

                          File and sand/emery paper were used to finish it off to size and a bright finish.

                          The pre-Apprentice trainees were about 14-15 at that stage.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JimDobson View Post
                            How do you turn a free form shape like this on a lathe?

                            (not the thread section, the curved handle part)

                            I'd like to make a couple of new handles for my lathe.



                            Just noticed that you're in Australia so the ebay link may not be the best for other than giving you maybe another option to consider. Got some these a while back and really like the shape because they're very comfortable to use:



                            found here, in the US they're $10. Making one... google "radius ball turning attachment".

                            fwiw...

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                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=iMisspell;943582...Personaly im not sure how to make a shape like that with a manul unless you use a tracer attachment _[/QUOTE]

                              A while back I did an article for our Sponsor's publication that demonstrated an easy bracket to hold a pattern and a pattern follower for the cross-slide that was designed for my Atlas 10 inch. The slide simply needs to be held against the pattern while being moved along the ways for the finish cut. Roughing cuts get you close. For stuff like aluminum being cut with tool steel, there would be very little finish polishing required. The pattern is simply a piece of scrap aluminum or steel sheet and actual size to the part. The tip of the cutter is of the same cross sectional form as the tracer pin on the slide. It takes a while to work up the bracket and follower, but once it's made, this stuff is a breeze.
                              See the kind of stuff you get when you read HSM and MW?

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