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  • Seated working at machine

    Does anybody else use a chair or stool while working at a machine for an extended period of time? Though I'm still fairly young, I find it extremely difficult to stand at my lathe or any other machine for an extended period of time as I'm very flat footed. Even with special shoe insoles it's almost torture to stand in one place for more than 30 mins or so and I'm looking for a simple solution. Does anyone have similar problems? What do you do?
    I have one of those "anti-fatigue" mats, but they are a band-aid on a bullet hole. I've been thinking about adding a swing out stool attached to my lathe stand, like the ones that we had in our old schools here.
    Any ideas?(other than suck it up or quit being a wuss haha)

  • #2
    I can stand or walk about 40 minutes a day max so I use a shower chair with adjustable legs & a back. It's very lightweight to move around the shop & works well for me.
    Last edited by flylo; 10-20-2014, 07:29 AM. Reason: 40 minutes

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    • #3
      Decades ago we bought a restaurant to run as a family business. Originally it had a long bar with milkshake machines, etc- sort of a common theme back in the '50s. Through renovations, we 'got rid' of the stools, but I kept a few. I still have one, and I fabricated a new seat for it that was comfortable to sit on. I use it if I'm going to be at the mill for any length of time. I wouldn't be able to use it in front of the lathe, and I'm not sure that I'd want to anyway.

      I have placed rubber mats everywhere I'd be standing at a machine, and that helps a lot.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #4
        I'd be very surprised if there are not a lot more people here with similar problems.

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        • #5
          Try something like this: http://www.focaluprightfurniture.com...standing-seat/

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          • #6
            Yup. There was a similar 'chair' years ago where your knees rested on a padded board. It was kind of a cross between kneeling and sitting, so it put your back into a good shape. I don't know how well it worked, but I made up something similar that was good.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              I have a laboratory seat that a company I worked for was throwing out. Perfectly fine $400 chair that only had a split in the upholstery, but whatever, duck tape works wonders... It's the perfect height for reaching my mill and I used it a lot a few years ago when I was having back problems. Even now that my back is fine, the chair is still handy for sitting and assembling stuff.

              Try to find a local surplus office furniture place, they often carry industrial furniture also. I picked up a nice $800 Steelcase office chair for $65.

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              • #8
                I normally stand bc I'm usually multi-tasking between cleaning, setting up another part, etc, but Ive been known to use one of my shop stools to sit at either machine. I'm 6'4 so I do like to get down to their height a bit at times, the downside is I worry about falling over or not being able to move quickly in an "oh s$%^" moment.
                "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
                  the downside is <snip> not being able to move quickly in an "oh s$%^" moment.
                  I worry about that too. I have a bar stool I keep in the shop, but I only use it when the task is repetitive and set up is proven stable. My little SB9 can only take off so much per pass, and I have many passes to take. Take one or two cuts, everything looks good, drag up the stool and relax a little. Same at the mill.
                  Definition: Racecar - a device that turns money into noise.

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                  • #10
                    Standing hurts. Longer I stand more it hurts. My solution is a good office chair and computer. Work for a while then sit and do other things. This has helped stop silly mistakes and caught design errors.

                    Bob

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                    • #11
                      Since my lathe is elevated on 4 x 4's, I have sufficient vertical allowance for an "engineered" surface to stand on:

                      3/8" plywood on the bottom + 1/2" rubber pad + 1/8" plywood on top (to keep swarf out of the pad). The plywood/rubber 'sandwich' (2' x 4') rests on four 1" x 3" strips evenly spaced on the bottom.* The whole construction is 1-3/4" high.

                      *This is to allow airflow underneath: lack of a vapor barrier under the concrete slab prohibits unventilated floor covering.
                      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



                      This provides for a 6 hour session or more at the lathe, though as the time period increases, my back may begin to complain.




                      Personally I'm leery about sitting in front of a lathe, though my post middle-age reflexes might be insufficient to move out of harm's way even while standing.

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                      • #12
                        As my Grandpop used to tell me when I was a young pup.."Don't make a job look harder than it is! If you can do it sitting down, take a seat!"

                        Of course, He lived through the Depression, where people were a lot more active and obesity was a lot less noticeable.
                        By the time one earns a degree from the school of experience, he's too old to practice. Wayne

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                        • #13
                          I have a couple of chairs called SitStand. They have gas shocks so are infinitely adjustable for height within their range. They are kind of like a bar stool, only you are standing, with some weight on the stool and some on your feet. I don't use them for mill or lathe, but quite a bit when surface grinding.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by elf View Post
                            Nice picture in the background too

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                            • #15
                              Maybe you can hang yourself from a robot arm like this girl


                              From this awesome thread on PM
                              http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...infant-239710/

                              Igor

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