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Lectric heat in the middel of the floor.

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  • Lectric heat in the middel of the floor.

    Here's a little shop story inspired by the post about electrical grounding in an old house.

    About this time of year in 1976 or so, I went around a planer mill where my favorite Hammond face wheel grinder lived tucked behind a column. Bert Harp was running the machine. There was a large stretch of floor between the machine (this was a whopper of a planer mill with a 24 ft table) and the wall. Iin the middle of the floor was a cofffee cup gently steaming. I looked closer. The cup was sitting on an electrical J-box plate.

    "What the heck, Bert?" I asked pointing to the coffee cup. "Steam pipe under there. Keeps my coffee warm." I bummed a screwdriver, popped the plate and beheld a half dozen wires and wire nuts sitting in boiling water. How long had that been going on? I called maintenence and Paul White came down. He marveled at this as we traded jokes etc. So, the power was shut off for a couple of machine outlets and work lights. The boiling stopped. The breaker was locked out and the shipyard's public works was called; it was their baby. In time, a couple guys came and vacuumed water out the conduit, set up a blower to circulate dry air to evaporate the moisture, and in a couple days, the condut was dry and safe to re-energize the curcuits within - until the next roof leak.

    Meanwhile Bert's coffee warmer was out of commission and he was not happy. He liked his coffee hot but he was a sipper. His cup sat for some time between sips and so half way through the cup the coffee got cold. Yuk!. His coffee warmer was taken away through my agency so it was my fault his coffee got cold. He held a small grudge against me for years after. "Morning Bert" "Humph." He held dozens of petty grudges like that. People knew this little flaw and worked around it. Sooner or later the whole planet would get on his list. He was a fine machinist otherwise so his quirk was forgivable even if his co-workers weren't.

    People like Bert Harp gave J R Williams inspiration for his comic strips and calenders.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 10-24-2014, 09:38 AM.

  • #2
    I can fully understand Bert's dilemma and his desire to hold a grudge. As a mechanic in the Army I often drove a massive wrecker that had the tendency to be called upon to pull some dummy out of the mud or do field repairs 15 miles from nowhere. This usually happened at chow time so I began carrying MREs or if near civilization, cans of Chef-Boyardee or other precooked meals. My wrecker was powered by a turbo over supercharged 8V71 that made quite a bit of heat, so often I'd throw a can of dinner in the valley of the engine's Vee before the trip out, and when I got on-site an hour or more later itd be ready to eat before work commenced.

    Unfortunately, one of our supply drivers asked to borrow a chain one day and without thinking, I told him to just take it out of the chain box where I kept my stash of Spaghetti-Os. When he asked, I explained my cooking method to him which led to his dummy-self trying it. Unfortunately, he didnt understand the difference in fire-resistance between my tin-can and his cardboard+plastic TV dinner, and the fool nearly caught his truck on fire in the process. Luckily, all he did was make a horrific mess and stunk up the motorpool something fierce, unfortunately for me I caught a ton of trouble for "damage to govt property" and almost never got away w/cooking my canned kids' dinners again.
    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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    • #3
      When I worked for a steel building manufacturer in one of their welding shops 'bout a hund'rt years ago, I saw a welder pull a foil wrapped bundle from his lunch box and place it on a huge beam he just got done welding on then go to work on another beam. When the lunch buzzer went off he opened the foil and commenced to eat. Looked like a fine idea, especially during the winter! The man always had a hot lunch. I often wondered if he ever burnt the food.
      Krutch


      Mentally confused and prone to wandering!

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      • #4
        Many of you Lower-Forty-Eighters have probably never heard of it, but there's been a product for many, many years for snowmachines called a Hot Dogger. It's just a small sheetmetal box and some long springs so that the box can be attached to the exhaust pipe of your snowmobile. Most were two-stroke, so you'd clamp it around the fat portion of the pipe.

        Throw a couple hot dogs, or a burrito or whatever, into the box, go for a ride, come back, have a nice toasty-hot 'dog.

        That story told, years ago I helped a friend haul home an old snowmachine that supposedly ran but which he was just going to use for parts. After we unloaded it, he started checking it over and we noticed the Hot Dogger. You guessed it- there was a pair of charcoal-black twigs in there that were at one time hot dogs.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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        • #5
          My dad liked hot soup for lunch. For a lot of years all our electrical trucks had a Coleman single burner propane stove installed in a box over the engine cover. Each truck had a supply of canned Cambells soup, spoons, etc. When I was a kid and worked with dad it was my job to fire up the stove and heat the soup at lunch time.

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          • #6
            For years I fired and maintained a Scotch Marine Wet Back boiler. There was a 5or6 in. space between the fire box and smoke box. Made a great oven for TV dinners and such.
            Jim

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            • #7
              In the toolroom I worked in you often couldn't get your part in the draw oven just before dinner time because it was full of meals.
              .
              "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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              • #8
                I remember growing up in a small village in Ontario where there were a group of boys about 8 to 10 years older than my group of 12 year olds. They were often held up as "bad boys" by my mother, but they really weren't bad fellows to us younger kids, just a bit wild and full of Hellery. One of them got married in the local church, and headed away to the nearest city for a few days of "Honeymoon." The Honeymooners got about 5 miles out of town and were overwhelmed by a smell so disgusting they had to stop the car and get out. One of the friends had caught a couple of big carp the night before and wired them to the groom`s car`s exhaust manifold!!!
                Brian Rupnow

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                  Many of you Lower-Forty-Eighters have probably never heard of it, but there's been a product for many, many years for snowmachines called a Hot Dogger. It's just a small sheetmetal box and some long springs so that the box can be attached to the exhaust pipe of your snowmobile. Most were two-stroke, so you'd clamp it around the fat portion of the pipe.

                  Throw a couple hot dogs, or a burrito or whatever, into the box, go for a ride, come back, have a nice toasty-hot 'dog.

                  That story told, years ago I helped a friend haul home an old snowmachine that supposedly ran but which he was just going to use for parts. After we unloaded it, he started checking it over and we noticed the Hot Dogger. You guessed it- there was a pair of charcoal-black twigs in there that were at one time hot dogs.

                  Doc.


                  haha, i have never used one but have seen them and a couple others using them. People use them on cars/trucks as well.

                  One time at a nascar race where hot dogs are a cheap $7 each I noticed a guy in front of me open up a thermos and proceed to dump all its contents on the ground. I thought wtf you are wasting all your hot coffee/water. Then after he drained all the water he starts digging around in the thermos with his fingers. Out he pulls a hot hot dog! Then another and another and so on for all his buddies. Brilliant!
                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    That's a great story, Mr. Addy, and well-written! Over the years you've come up with a number of like tales. Have you considered writing a book?

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                    • #11
                      crock pot exhaust cooker. I think there are a couple commercial versions out there.


                      http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/g...#axzz3H4ba38pk

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