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Attachment on turret lathe question

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  • Attachment on turret lathe question

    What is this attachment on this turret lathe used for?

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    A wild guess would be an automatic threading attachment. I don't see the follower part that determines the thread pitch, it could be under the cover at the back of the headstock in the second picture though. The tool slide looks like it's inclined about 30 degrees for infeeding between passes.

    Hardinge chuckers used a similar system. It's an effective way to thread on machines without lead screws. The downside is you need a master and follower for each separate thread pitch (big bucks to accumulate a variety of pitches).

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    • #3
      definitely a threading unit that utilizes a pitch master + follower. Slow to set up but fast as heck once it is for running multiples. DR, if you look on the second picture down, the follower can be seen on the upper left of the attachment. It is bronze (brass?). The spring on the rear of the bar auto retracts the tool via pushing the long, solid bar toward the tailstock. While the follower is engaged (pull the toolholder slide down by hand), the bar moves toward the headstock under power by the master pitch screw (can't see it in the pics). This increases pressure by the spring compressing, so when the leader is disengaged the tool snaps back to start again. Dial in the cut via the tool slide and away you go again. Very fast, very repeatable, but only does one pitch per master/follower and set-up for cutting length/position. The greatest advantage is that thread cutting is entirely self-contained with the unit. No stopping the spindle, no messing with any of the other tools (compound, tailstock, etc.) Look closely and there will be a gear or other mechanical connection between the lathe spindle and the rotating master thread. This means that it is impossible to cross-thread at anywhere in the engagement since the master is continually matched to spindle rotation at any speed and regardless if the follower is engaged.
      Last edited by Arthur.Marks; 10-26-2014, 12:46 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Arthur.Marks View Post
        definitely a threading unit that utilizes a pitch master + follower. Slow to set up but fast as heck once it is for running multiples. DR, if you look on the second picture down, the follower can be seen on the upper left of the attachment. It is bronze (brass?). The spring on the rear of the bar auto retracts the tool via pushing the long, solid bar toward the tailstock. While the follower is engaged (pull the toolholder slide down by hand), the bar moves toward the headstock under power by the master pitch screw (can't see it in the pics). This increases pressure by the spring compressing, so when the leader is disengaged the tool snaps back to start again. Dial in the cut via the tool slide and away you go again. Very fast, very repeatable, but only does one pitch per master/follower and set-up for cutting length/position. The greatest advantage is that thread cutting is entirely self-contained with the unit. No stopping the spindle, no messing with any of the other tools (compound, tailstock, etc.) Look closely and there will be a gear or other mechanical connection between the lathe spindle and the rotating master thread. This means that it is impossible to cross-thread at anywhere in the engagement since the master is continually matched to spindle rotation at any speed and regardless if the follower is engaged.
        Okay, I see it now. I wasn't looking up on top of the headstock. They would have to have some kind of drive off the spindle for the master so they're synchronized.

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