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Rarely used tools you have no regrets about buying.

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  • Rarely used tools you have no regrets about buying.

    Hand held hydraulic tubing universal flare tool. (Brake line, Fuel line, etc.) Was not cheap compared to the $20 screw operated alternatives but when I use it ever few years I am very glad to have it. I bought it years ago when I had to replace brake lines on a number of my vehicles. No regrets. http://www.mastercool.com/pages/flaring_tools.html

    Spool gun for my Lincoln power mig welder. I love it for aluminum, don't use it often but I love having it handy and ready to go.

  • #2
    Rockwell hardness tester and thread micrometer are my two biggies.

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    • #3
      Hammer Drill! Saved me a lot of sweat when mounting my garage/shop AC and heater and it will be very useful when I bolt my lathe down. If I never use it again after that it is still money well spent.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      Make it fit.
      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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      • #4
        Great big pullers made by Facom. I'd use them once a year and nothing else is going to do the job....and best of all, nobody else has them.
        "...do you not think you have enough machines?"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SirLesPatterson View Post
          Hand held hydraulic tubing universal flare tool.
          I have one of these although not all of the dies pictured in that link. Once you use one you will never want to use one of the handheld cheapies again.

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          • #6
            Hydraulic nicopress tool. Had a job once making a bunch of 12" long safety cables. Not exactly an everyday tool, but....

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            • #7
              Electronic tool: a TelTone telephone line simulator with Caller ID. Basically you plug one or two phones (landline) into it and it behaves like they were on the regular phone network: get dial tone, busy signal, etc., one phone can call the other, caller ID shows the calling number, etc.

              Used it for two projects, been in the box for the last 10 years. Made its money then was quietly retired. Can't give it away these days!

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              • #8
                Telescoping Gantry crane, I have a forklift & several other lifts but when I need it, I need it. It also comes apart to move to other places but I haven't told anyone till now.

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                • #9
                  The hammer dril for sure, the EZ Tram, a coaxial indicator. Bob.

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                  • #10
                    My tap and die sets would probably qualify as rarely used, I probably need to cut about 20 threads a year. It was worth it, even before I got a metal lathe.

                    If you do plumbing work, it's well worth picking up a ratcheting PVC pipe cutter. They run about $10 and cut PVC up to about 1". Works for caulk tube nozzles too, if a knife isn't handy. :-) I've cut PEX and plastic pond tubing as well. In saved effort alone, it will pay for itself on the first job.

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                    • #11
                      most of my rarely used tools are ones to do with working on the car - steering pump pulley puller, chain strap for unbolting the crankshaft pulley, angle grinder for grinding out seized bolts in the rear suspension (although that admittedly has other uses), vacuum pump and gauges for the AC system. All of them paid for themselves with a single use, so in my mind they're now free and owe me nothing. Some of them I'd be really happy if I never had to use them again!

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                      • #12
                        I have a thread chasing/restoring tool set from MAC Tools. They look like taps and dies but won't cut threads. They will clean grunge and rust out of (or off of) existing threads and will repair minor damage from hammer strikes or crossed threads. Don't use them often, but a lifesaver when I do. The set also has thread files that are worth their weight in gold. I fixed a $400 part at work- the threaded end had been damaged in transit and would not screw into the mating part. About 15 minutes of thread filing and it was as good as new.

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                        • #13
                          Surface Grinder.
                          I've only used it for about 3 or 4 real 'paying' jobs in the past 4 years.
                          But I'm glad I have it.

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                          • #14
                            Not rarely used, but not used that often- the TP grinder. Sometimes I need to reduce the diameter of a hardened shaft to make it fit a bearing or something. Or put an accurate surface on a rubber part- no better way.

                            How about a pocket screwdriver- I made one by cross drilling four different tips, then press-fitting a piece of music wire through them. About as compact as can be, so it truly is a pocket tool. Just fold out the one you need to use, and the rest act as the handle. It was small enough that I actually did carry it with me- and there were times I needed it there and then.

                            These are home made tools, but for the purchased ones- the compact sawzall. I modified one to put the blade out in front of the spindle so it would cut right up to an edge. Gave it to my employer, and he needed it on about the second day. For the most part it lays in the bottom of the tool box, but a few times now it has been indispensable.
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                            • #15
                              Where do I begin? Rarely used but no regrets are 90% of my tools. Top two favorites tho have to be the handheld impact screwdrivers and the thread files, both have saved me countless times.
                              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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