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Need some suggestions on leveling concrete floor

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  • Need some suggestions on leveling concrete floor

    Recently picked up an Enco 12x36. Have it on plywood pads but the floor in the garage is not smooth, it is all bump and pits, probably as prep for some kind of tile floor, and the machine has a little bit of rock in it. (garage floor was that way when I bought the house...)

    Any recommendations as to a grout or cement that I might be able to use to smooth it out? Probably 5/8" from top of the bumps to bottom of the pits.

  • #2
    Check at Lowes, Home Depot, Menards, or wherever for their version of "Self Leveling Cement", "Self Leveling Concrete", "Self Leveling Floor Resurfacer", you get the idea. Flooring guys use it to level a concrete floor before installing carpet, hardwood etc. Most need to be in a layer 1/4" deep at the thinest spot, though 1/2" is better.
    Kevin

    More tools than sense.

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    • #3
      +1 on self leveller, if you don't want to do the entire floor, just make a dam round where you do, veg oil the timber too
      M

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      • #4
        A co-worker in New Jersey rented a terrazzo floor grinder and smoothed his nicely. looked great, too, once sealed with epoxy.

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        • #5
          Depending on how your lathe is set up for leveling screws, this may work for you.

          Get some round stock. 4"-5" dia cold rolled works good. Cut it off in 1" or 1.5" thick discs. One disc for each hold down location on your lathe base. Chuck these up on your lathe and face them off so they are flat on the faces and the same thickness. Drill and tap them for whatever size stud will fit the mounting holes in your lathe base. Clean the discs with lacquer thinner or brake clean or something to get all the oil off. Figure out where they need to be to bolt the lathe to them and clean the floor with a wire brush and some compressed air. Whatever it takes to get the floor clean. Get some caulking gun tubes of PL-800 or PL 3X or whatever one of the crazy high strength construction adhesives you want to use and glue the discs to the floor. Let the glue dry at least a day.

          Insert a stud into the disc with red lock-tite. Depending on how you lathe is set up, you can put a nut and a hardened washer under the base (between the disc and the machine base) and another hard washer and a nut on the top. Adjust the nuts under the base to get the machine level and then tighten the top nuts to make it tight. Or, you can just put shims under the base and use the nuts to clamp things down. Personally, I think it is much eaiser to get the machine level with the screw adjustments, but either way works. It won't matter how rough the floor is, the machine will be solid and level. If the floor is really sloped you can cut the discs to different thicknesses to get it pretty level and fine tune with the studs. Once everything is level and the nuts are tight it is as solid as if it was bolted down with anchors. It transfers the vibrations into the floor and the machine is much smoother than just letting it sit on concrete.

          My LeBlond has 7 hollow leveling screws that will accept 5/8" studs. I glued it down this way and it worked excellent. When I moved my lathe after it had been glued down for about a year, I lifted the machine up and then hit the discs on the side with a hammer to break the glue joint. A couple of the discs actually pulled a little bit of concrete up when they broke loose. That glue is impressive stuff.

          It is a pretty simple deal, probably less expensive than the concrete option, and you wont have to worry about the self leveling concrete being too thin and breaking up.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by KJ1I View Post
            Check at Lowes, Home Depot, Menards, or wherever for their version of "Self Leveling Cement", "Self Leveling Concrete", "Self Leveling Floor Resurfacer", you get the idea. Flooring guys use it to level a concrete floor before installing carpet, hardwood etc. Most need to be in a layer 1/4" deep at the thinest spot, though 1/2" is better.
            Yup. My neighbor is a flooring contractor. 30 years in the business. He uses the concrete when needed. Make sure to follow the prep recommendations and it will be durable. JR
            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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            • #7
              I'd be more inclined to use expanding grout and holding-down bolts.

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              • #8
                I would for sure use some sort of leveling concrete. Do a big enough area so it will be easy to clean up the chips. You could sure level the lathe with leveling feet but that won't solve your clean up problems.

                Our home was built in 1724 so it is nearly 300 years old and would you believe that not all the floors are dead level. I have used quite a bit of leveling compound when we put down ceramic tile. Especially on the window sills. Some of the walls are three feet thick and of stone construction. Putting ceramic tile on the window sills was a challenge to say the least. Just make sure you have the leveling compound wet enough to flow easily.
                Last edited by Black Forest; 10-28-2014, 04:10 AM.
                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                • #9
                  The good thing about SL cement is that you can, bay by bay do the whole floor, and paint it, also it's very strong stuff, about 45-50 N concrete equivalent, hard stuff so don't put it where you don't want it! I found out the hard way
                  My shop floor is terrible, the concrete isn't very good as I was learning at the time, wrong mix by hand, never again!
                  There are glass reinforcing anti crack fibre additives available too
                  Mark

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                  • #10
                    The building I once owned had a floor which was not level nor thick. I drilled and busted holes in the concrete and formed around the hole and poured pads for the machines I had. Pads were around six to eight in. thick, rest of floor was two to four in. thick. Pads were level and machines had no moving issues. Had to bolt lathe to the pad as I miscalculated and the pad was almost too small in area and the lathe bench legs were at the edges of the pad.
                    Krutch


                    Mentally confused and prone to wandering!

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                    • #11
                      Hydraulic cement, comes in a can. Non shrinking filler/plug for basement walls and floors.
                      Gary


                      Appearance is Everything...

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                      • #12
                        Check the floor isn't sloping or it may all run out the door. In the UK garage floors are required to slope towards th edoor so that petrol fumes flow out.

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