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  • Changegear storage solutions

    I'm curious if others on here with change gear lathes have come up with anything nifty for storing their gears. I'd love to see pics of what others have come up with.

    Over the past few weeks I've been thinking about it. The gears for my previous machine were just kept in a small toolbox under the bench, and I wanted something better this time. Keeping them stacked up looks neat, but digging out the one you need and putting it back in the pile when you're done is sort of a hassle. And I'm always worried they'll get knocked over. I wanted a way to keep them stored without needing a bunch of space, but with quick and easy access. I eventually decided that a stack of very narrow shelves was probably the best idea, then it occurred to me I might find a quicker solution in the home/kitchen section of my local department store. I found an extremely inexpensive 2 piece dish drying rack that was almost exactly what I needed. With a bit of cutting and bending, this is what I came up with... not sure if it will be a permanent solution yet, but it's great for now:



    Max
    http://joyofprecision.com/

  • #2
    My solution.
    http://www.homemodelenginemachinist....14&postcount=1

    Regards,

    Steve

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    • #3
      nothing fancy for me.
      piece of plywood with some long (2" i think) dry wall screws.
      Was gonna use nails, but the head of the screws would prevent them from falling off (for what ever reason).

      Maybe to save more space, could pair the gears two per screw ???

      ~ What was once an Opinion, became a Fact, to be later proven Wrong ~
      http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com
      https://www.youtube.com/user/thisisjusthowidoit

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      • #4
        That dish rack is a great idea, it'd work well for something like saw blades in the woodshop also.

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        • #5
          This was my new lathe when i got it.




          This was after a few mods.




          The main train has been replaced by timing belt which allows me to run at far higher speeds with less noise and all the common threads can be done at this setting or with the pulleys reversed.

          For all specials or imperial [ this is a metric lathe and was bought as such ] then the gears are all to hand under the cover to stop having to root thru. The two large 120 / 127 transposition gears live on the banjo all the while.
          .

          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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          • #6
            My solution:



            I had built the shelf unit and saw all that wasted space on the upright. So I printed some full sized labels with the gears on them and pasted them on. Then a few screws and done. Each gear is instantly visible and available without moving anything. And right at hand, next to the banjo arm. There are several additional compound gears including my metric conversion stored in the same way on the other side of that upright. Only difference is they required longer screws.

            Inspired by this, you can see that I added a piece of shelf board below the table level to hang my clamp sets.

            That photo was in my trailer shop. The trailer is in storage with most of my shop in it. When I get the lathe in my garage, I will "discover" the unused space on the other shelf upright so I will have to do something with it too. Perhaps I will use pegboard there.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              Wow really clever stuff here guys, this is great!
              Max
              http://joyofprecision.com/

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              • #8
                Back when I had a change-gear lathe, I struggled with the same kind of issues. I eventually figured out that the best solution was a custom-fitted box attached directly to the lathe, that had a shaft upon which one could stack all the gears in order. better still, once so situated, one could add a secondary gear on a lever, so that you could select the gear you wanted and use it in place, without having to remove it from the stack.

                Since that discovery, I've used that storage method for all my subsequent lathes.

                Doc.
                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mars-red View Post
                  . Keeping them stacked up looks neat, but digging out the one you need and putting it back in the pile when you're done is sort of a hassle. And I'm always worried they'll get knocked over.
                  So turn the stack 90 degrees so they stand on end. Make a shelf which slopes slightly towards the wall so they can't roll off and add end caps to the shelf
                  for them to lean against.
                  Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RichR View Post
                    So turn the stack 90 degrees so they stand on end. Make a shelf which slopes slightly towards the wall so they can't roll off and add end caps to the shelf
                    for them to lean against.
                    Well that's sort of what I did, but without turning it 90 degrees... and without having to build shelves.
                    Max
                    http://joyofprecision.com/

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                    • #11
                      I had a "mirror door medicine cabinet" laying about. Removed the shelves and installed 5/8 in. dowel pegs spaced for the various gears. Wrote the tooth count on the end of the dowels Then hung the cabinet on the wall near lathe headstock. Easy to use and out of the way.
                      Jim

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                      • #12
                        this is my way.


                        Roy.

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                        • #13
                          I like it. How did you cut the slots with different radii?

                          Originally posted by wheeltapper View Post
                          this is my way.


                          Roy.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          Make it fit.
                          You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                            I like it. How did you cut the slots with different radii?
                            -It's laminated. Seems the gear sections were cut to shape with a bandsaw or something, and the 'spacers' made to stack them together. Look close- you can see the spacers appear to be thin plywood, while the gear sections are particle board.

                            Nice work, too. Handy and compact. Photo almost made it look like it was hung on the wall, making me wonder, just for a second, how he kept the gears from falling out.

                            Doc.
                            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here's what I did a few years ago. The gears are stored out of the muck & mire plus changing setups is easier.
                              http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...hlight=GEARBOX
                              Milton

                              "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                              "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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