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  • Rearranging shop

    For some time I have been trying to figure out how to shift things around. The shop is in two areas, one is a small room that was the old coal bin, plus an area outside it. The other is a large room at the other end of the basement.

    The small room has the Logan and toolboxes, plus workbench, and teh area outside it has the mill and drill press. The big room has "stuff", plus several grinders.

    I prefer the smaller area to work in, it's warmer in winter. But the grinders tend to make the big room unfriendly to equipment, and that's where teh space is. So I concluded to put the grinders in the area outside the coal bin, and the mill and DP in the big room. That makes space for the otehr mill, and the Rivett, which is pretty huge with its underdrive base, especially for an 8" lathe.

    So, this stuff has to move



    The DP is a pain, it's huge and extremely heavy, with an 18 x 28" CI base, and a large column, head, heavy table, etc. I don't want to disassemble it, it's too tall at almost 80" to make that convenient. The mill should be fairly easy, I have rollers that should allow moving it, even though the basement has an uneven floor due to floor drains.

    The DP does "let down" so the head and table are lower. It has a leadscrew, and you can "inchworm" it up and down by alternately clamping the lower nut and upper crank box, lowering table, clamping nut, loosening crankbox and head, then cranking down the head, tightening it and crankbox, etc.

    That should be the easy part, I need to figure out how to drag the DP around. SO far I let everything down as far as possible, as a first step. This thing is a "15 puzzle", since I have to move something out of the "hole", in order to move anything else in. The DP is the cork in the bottle.

    Partly let down


    All the way down with leadscrew against base


    DP base, no flat surfaces to use with rollers.



    Too tall and top heavy even in "let-down" condition, to get roller units under it safely, and not possible to use pipe or the like due to the cut sides. Might slide a piece of ply under it, and then use pipe rollers, but that may not be practical.

    I may have to just use a come-along, if I find something reasonable to hook it onto. It has a stated weight of 420 lb without motor, so it is a chunk to move. Not 2-wheeler friendly. Maybe a sheet of UHMW plastic, if I had it....

    We'll have to see what I come up with.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 11-01-2014, 10:54 PM.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    Pry it up and put it on 3/8" round steel laid like railway lines, dab of grease and you can push it one handed. If you have a long way to go then lay a couple more at the side so you always stay on the rails.

    At 3/8" no way is it going to tip if it looses a rails. Since being shown that trick many years ago by a 70 year old who pushed a BRidgy out of a brick floored workshop on his own I have never used or even trusted pipes for moving machines again.
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      You are right!

      I've even seen that done.... Thanks for the reminder. Dunno if I have enough round steel, or strap, for that matter..... I'll look around.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        Along the same line, a couple of boards, preferably hardwood, for rails, a couple of shorter ones under the DP. Grease the sliding surfaces.

        Comment


        • #5
          I use an engine hoist for moves like this. I lift the machine, set a plank across the hoist's legs, drop the weight onto the plank, and roll the hoist + machine together.
          "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
            I use an engine hoist for moves like this. I lift the machine, set a plank across the hoist's legs, drop the weight onto the plank, and roll the hoist + machine together.
            Excellent idea... But no room for a hoist (they look small until you get one inside), and the floor isn't flat.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

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            • #7
              As your floor is uneven , why not get some 3/8 reo bar (the round stuff) , stitch weld it to a piece of 1/4 plate wide enough to go under the DP , may require two if its a long move.

              I have moved floor plates that way and they could be easily pushed with a bar or pulled with a boat winch .

              Michael

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              • #8
                I use 4 foot lengths of 2" angle iron for rails.
                Moved my big TOS that way, and the CVA.
                Lay them like an inverted V and they will bridge gaps to, which makes them useful for on/offloading from a trailer

                Dave
                Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

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                • #9
                  Had to move a comparator out of my garage. It was on a pallet bur I had no pallet jack. I put angle iron under the edges of the pallet on each side. I then used some lengths of 1/2 inch rod as rollers to move it out. The weight was at least 900 pounds and the angle iron flexed a little between the bottom slats of the pallet but it worked just fine.
                  North Central Arkansas

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                  • #10
                    Why not leave the machinery in place and rearrange the walls?

                    I mean, we rebuild machines & other tools from time to time ... why not walls? If yours are for an old coal bin, surely they could use some upgrading by now!

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                    • #11
                      I've also used sand to move heavy boxes or flat bottom items, works like a bartender sling a beer 30' down the bar in an old western.
                      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                      country, in easy stages."
                      ~ James Madison

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fjk View Post
                        Why not leave the machinery in place and rearrange the walls?

                        I mean, we rebuild machines & other tools from time to time ... why not walls? If yours are for an old coal bin, surely they could use some upgrading by now!
                        I've thought about that, but the excavating, and concrete work, not to mention that something has to hold up the tons of brick wall above the basement level over any doors to extensions..... well that does tend to be a stopper.... Most of the shop area is not in the coal bin... it expanded out of there long ago. At one time I had a plan to move a wall of the bin and get everything inside.... good job I didn't do it, as it would have rapidly been obsoleted.

                        But as far as arrangements, between pipes with necessary access ports, laundry (not movable) stairs and furnace (ditto), there get to be limited options.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A significant re-arranging my shop is so far down my "to do" list that its all but taken off and if I have my way it won't happen.

                          The mere thought of it let alone doing it equates it to self-flagellation:

                          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-flagellation

                          https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ss...f+flagellation

                          If my aspirations for the shop come to pass (it will) then the "re-arrangement" will be included in the "total clean-out".

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                          • #14
                            Well, "bin it" isn't in my vocabulary when it comes to the shop re-organization. I just need to get some rational re-distribution of stuff so that it is all usable. Then I need to get the shop crane working so that I can move some un-needed items up to ground level for sale.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              JT
                              The last time I had your problem I built a new house. Now it's too small.
                              LOL!
                              Bill
                              I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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