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  • Effective mindsets for machining.. pro/homeshop

    Again I don't draw a line of separation between homeshop (hobby)
    and professional (occupational) metal working regarding skill or any
    measurement of importance.

    However when you work on someone else's dime, there's a level of extranious
    activity that is not encouraged, or perhaps tollerated.
    I would encourage home shop brothers to at least consider this
    even thO' you have the full option of engaging in odd equations
    and ill~conceived poorly layed out sine-bar excersises. (other current posts).

    We can learn from everything, "true" but there are things that can be quickly rejected
    as having no likely value in application. An argument over a rant that goes on for pages
    and pages getting nowhere. Attempting to make a thing work with given feeds and speeds
    right "from the source" when it's clearly not working would fall in this cattagory.
    Thow the damn book out the window, and turn up the brain-heat and go hunting for
    a process that works.

    ================
    “Do nothing that is of no use”
    ― Miyamoto Musashi,
    ==================
    “from one thing, know ten thousand things”
    ― Miyamoto Musashi,
    ===============

    I don't let my mind fill up with data I can get from print.
    I rarely find it usefull to memorise anything.
    Rather obsorb the dynamic of what I just saw work,
    store it away in a way that it is not pidgeon-holed
    but readilly pulled right back to the front from any point
    of mental access to be re~applyed to a new situation
    or at least be considered for it.

    But that's just me.........
    Last edited by Old Hat; 11-19-2014, 10:01 AM.

  • #2
    So you don't memorize anything you can get from a book you threw out the window but you absorb dynamics & pull them back from any point of mental access?
    I think I'd rather have common sense, mechanical aptitude & keep my book.
    Last edited by flylo; 11-19-2014, 11:22 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      I shoulda set a timer.
      Damn a wasted opportunity, and it ain't even lunch yet.

      ===========
      See if this helps.
      If a thing is well grasped, it is retained with~out effort no?
      So inversely if a thing requires memorization I have to ask....

      how much mind power is worth tie~ing up on a it?
      Leave it somewhere on the hard drive, and keep the processor
      uncluttered for rapid cogent responses.
      Last edited by Old Hat; 11-19-2014, 11:51 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Different strokes for different folks.

        I think many of us want to learn *why* something works or does not work, and we're willing to spend extra time trying to figure it out. That disovery and challenge is what makes it interesting and fun vs. "work". Working smarter vs. working harder.

        There is also that delicate balance- The satisfaction of stepping into the shop and knocking a project out. Ah, sweet sweet project completion. Compared to the potential anguish of trashing a part due to a mistake. And some mistakes hurt more than others - like a dumb rookie mistake vs. trying to do something really challenging and just not quite pulling it off - but learning enough to get it right in the future.

        A lot of us get out of practice, because we don't do this stuff every day. I find I must work a lot more methodically when I am out of practice. I need to spend more time thinking about what I'm doing vs just doing it. I learn a lot from most of those long threads. Even about stuff where I thought I pretty much already had it covered. Sometimes asking about something you think you already know can teach you a lot.

        Comment


        • #5
          For " FUN" or for a " Dollar"?

          I use my home shop both for fun, building model steam engines, and for making a dollar, that is machining anything I can carry down the stairs myself that I reckon will help me make a living. With the models I am king, I decide on design, material, quality,even aesthetics. I have enough of them to play with already that I am not in a hurry-- a few hours extra are totally insignificant in the whole scheme of a 2000 hour plus adventure which I will likely give to my encouraging children and grandchildren once completed and run for fun for a year or two. However, work is a different kettle of fish, I make parts to drawings or sketches as rapidly as I know how, from material specified by customers,to as near those drawings as possible while making full use of the tolerances provided-- if they say within 10 thous then I make them within 10 thous whereas,just for my own satisfaction, I might spend extra time and chase one or two in model making. Experience gained from both mindsets crosses over and I feel both benefit from the other.Have fun work safe , regards David Powell.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Glug View Post
            Different strokes for different folks.

            I think many of us want to learn *why* something works or does not work, and we're willing to spend extra time trying to figure it out.
            That disovery and challenge is what makes it interesting and fun vs. "work". Working smarter vs. working harder.
            ...........Even about stuff where I thought I pretty much already had it covered. Sometimes asking about something you think you already know can teach you a lot.
            +1
            Originally posted by David Powell View Post
            Experience gained from both mindsets crosses over and I feel both benefit from the other.Have fun work safe , regards David Powell.
            +1

            Comment


            • #7
              Hey Old Hat, what is your address? I need to crawl around outside that window that you threw all those books out and see if I can find you spelling primer and throw it back in and maybe if I hit you in the head some of it will sink in to that head of yours!!!!

              Just pulling your leg. You are doing much better lately!
              Location: The Black Forest in Germany

              How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

              Comment


              • #8
                "I rarely find it usefull to memorise anything."

                I don't think you needed to tell us that.
                Regards, Marv

                Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                Location: LA, CA, USA

                Comment


                • #9
                  Google Chrome... now !
                  Won't fix a word but it red-lines it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Old Hat View Post
                    Google Chrome... now !
                    Won't fix a word but it red-lines it.
                    I use firefox and it underlines the words in red also. Then just right click and it gives the correct spelling. Click on the correct spelling and it fixes the word I typed wrong.
                    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The op's written communication skills do not live up to his proposed streamilined work porposal but I think he is trying to say that if you are employed in a miserable lifeless factory apply the same principles to your hobby so that you become a boring old fart.
                      SO
                      Only drink water since flavours and stimulants are unecessary.
                      Eat only food sufficient to sustain your life, that being bland and probably vegetarian.
                      Never decorate or paint anything except for corrosion protection since beautification is not cost effective.
                      Don't read fiction or watch any TV apart from the weather forcast as needed to plan exterior work sessions.
                      Music - bah humbug except for the work's hooter to get you out of bed (as in the 19th century mill towns.
                      Don't take it to hart - if you have one

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Mr Goebels- Home room teacher
                        Tilden Tech high School
                        Fall, 1953
                        Incoming Freshman Class
                        "What is intelligence ? "
                        " Is it memorizing this book ? " holds a book up to his head
                        "NO"
                        Throws book to the floor -BANG !
                        " memorizing a book clutters the brain"
                        "KNOWING where to look is--- INTELIGENCE"
                        May that fine man Rest In Piece--his words were not in vain.

                        +1 to Phil for reminding me of that occasion , and they are words to live by..I know I have followed them as well

                        Rich
                        Green Bay, WI

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ++1 Rich,
                          Knowing where to find it is the true sign of inteligence.

                          Chris

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ah, but finding it in a book, then faking that you knew it already- that's intelligence
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Old Hat View Post
                              Again I don't draw a line of separation between homeshop (hobby)
                              and professional (occupational) metal working regarding skill or any
                              measurement of importance.

                              However when you work on someone else's dime, there's a level of extranious
                              activity that is not encouraged, or perhaps tollerated.
                              I would encourage home shop brothers to at least consider this
                              even thO' you have the full option of engaging in odd equations
                              and ill~conceived poorly layed out sine-bar excersises. (other current posts).

                              We can learn from everything, "true" but there are things that can be quickly rejected
                              as having no likely value in application. An argument over a rant that goes on for pages
                              and pages getting nowhere. Attempting to make a thing work with given feeds and speeds
                              right "from the source" when it's clearly not working would fall in this cattagory.
                              Thow the damn book out the window, and turn up the brain-heat and go hunting for
                              a process that works.

                              ================
                              “Do nothing that is of no use”
                              ― Miyamoto Musashi,
                              ==================
                              “from one thing, know ten thousand things”
                              ― Miyamoto Musashi,
                              ===============

                              I don't let my mind fill up with data I can get from print.
                              I rarely find it usefull to memorise anything.
                              Rather obsorb the dynamic of what I just saw work,
                              store it away in a way that it is not pidgeon-holed
                              but readilly pulled right back to the front from any point
                              of mental access to be re~applyed to a new situation
                              or at least be considered for it.

                              But that's just me.........
                              I agree with the OP in this as the mastering of basic concepts and first (and later) principles in Shop Math, Geometry and Trigonometry 101 and principles of machines and machining are basic and fundamental to "Workshop Practice" as are an honest appreciation of the limits of machines and machining as well as the operator ("HSM-er"?) as well as what is really required of and for the job at hand.

                              I try to always evaluate a job using first principles as regards the need for the job and the tools available and build up from there.

                              Its certainly a lot easier that "jumping in" either half way through a job and perhaps into a big "hole" that is avoidable that you may well that you may well have dug yourself into.

                              Comment

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