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Picked up this sad old milling vise

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  • RichR
    replied
    Hi Paul
    It's a shallow recess where the jaws meet. They act like a fixed set of parallels built into the jaws.

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    What is a "rebate" in this sense for vise jaws? The only references I found were to get money back.

    It might be possible to mill a V-slot using an end mill and holding the work at 45 degrees, although it might be harder to center. Also with a V-slot and for 90 degree corners, it can be helpful to cut a narrow notch in the corner so that a square-edged part will sit solidly on the edges and not the corner.

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  • MichaelP
    replied
    Sorry, I missed that. I thought it was about a V-groove for rod holding.

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  • RichR
    replied
    Hi MichaelP
    I was referring to the dimensions of the rebate on the top of the jaws.

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  • MichaelP
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    About 1/8" deep and 3/16" wide would be reasonable.
    This will be difficult with a 90-degree v-cutter. It will always create the total width exactly twice larger than the depth (unless the V-groove is over 90-degree or asymmetrical).
    Last edited by MichaelP; 12-08-2014, 04:45 PM.

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  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by RichR View Post
    Hi Richard


    I don't own any vee cutters but a rebate on the top sounds like a good idea. Any recommendations for the width and depth? The fixed jaw is 0.465" thick and
    the movable jaw is 0.412" thick.
    About 1/8" deep and 3/16" wide would be reasonable. Vee cutters come up on ebay from time to time and are not expensive. They double up for chamfering work as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • RichR
    replied
    Hi Richard
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    Looks good now. Can I suggest that you set the jaws in line on the mill, then mill a vee groove in both jaws about 1/2" down from the top, then you are good for holding round without packing? I used a 90 degree vee milling cutter for mine, but the angle isn't really critical. Possibly a shallow rebate along the top as well for holding thin parts?
    I don't own any vee cutters but a rebate on the top sounds like a good idea. Any recommendations for the width and depth? The fixed jaw is 0.465" thick and
    the movable jaw is 0.412" thick.

    Leave a comment:


  • MotorradMike
    replied
    Originally posted by Peter S View Post
    MM,

    Your vise is quite a bit different, e.g. you have a "solid" base, RichR's vise has a weird channel in the base. And the fixed jaw ends are different.
    Sorry for being an armchair vise detective....
    Yes, I think you're right.

    Leave a comment:


  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Looks good now. Can I suggest that you set the jaws in line on the mill, then mill a vee groove in both jaws about 1/2" down from the top, then you are good for holding round without packing? I used a 90 degree vee milling cutter for mine, but the angle isn't really critical. Possibly a shallow rebate along the top as well for holding thin parts?

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter S
    replied
    Originally posted by MotorradMike View Post
    MM,

    Your vise is quite a bit different, e.g. you have a "solid" base, RichR's vise has a weird channel in the base. And the fixed jaw ends are different.
    Sorry for being an armchair vise detective....

    Leave a comment:


  • RichR
    replied
    Hi browne92

    Originally Posted by RichR
    I still plan on milling the tops of the jaws flat and making up a handle for the screw.

    Originally posted by browne92 View Post
    Please do. It hurts just to look at them.

    Hmm....
    Pics...check.
    Low price...check.
    Only thing left is...you suck!
    Not being one to leave a fellow forum member in pain, I went out to the shop and cleaned up the tops of the jaws a bit. I also added a handhold to the
    rear of the vise to make it easier to pick up:





    I just noticed that I have the flat and lock washers reversed on the bolt on the right. I'll deal with that in the morning.

    Leave a comment:


  • v860rich
    replied
    raceneer
    I've been using the same vice the op pictured on a swivel base for years and it has never moved off whatever angle I had it set for.
    The bolts holding the rigid vice to the swivel base are the same size as what are used to hold the assy to the table.
    The only drawback to the swivel base is you loose a little space under the quill, on my BP it isn't a problem.

    THANX RICH

    Leave a comment:


  • raceneer
    replied
    Perfect thread timing guys.
    I was looking at vices all last night. Second hand ones here are hard to come by.
    I'm looking at a middle teir ~125mm vice, with a reversable jaw, can't decide if a swivel vice will be less rigid. Any word from those in the know? I've only ever used rigid vices. I like the ability to change angles to the table, but I fear a decent milling force may move it?
    Anyone comment please?
    Cheers.
    Race.
    Last edited by raceneer; 12-05-2014, 05:09 PM.

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  • jep24601
    replied
    Originally posted by Daveb View Post
    Most of this stuff should really be listed under 'moorings'
    Dave
    Funny you should say that. Just a few weeks ago I saw this old vise on the dockside at Scarpey in Scotland.:

    Leave a comment:


  • Daveb
    replied
    There are old machine vises advertised on *bay over here, many are badly abused and at very fancy prices, usually described as 'good condition', sometimes it's only the holes holding them together.
    Same thing with some drill presses, stand 'em in a draught and the table's likely to fall in half.
    Most of this stuff should really be listed under 'moorings'
    Dave

    Leave a comment:

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