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Re-restoring the mini camelback drill (Canedy Otto no. 28)

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  • Re-restoring the mini camelback drill (Canedy Otto no. 28)

    I got this drill a few years ago, slapped it on a board with a motor and used it, now it's time to do it up right, here's some pictures from shortly after I got it, and a couple videos documenting the progress, I'm not done yet but I'm plugging away at it.

    Here's a thread on pm with the photos of the drill pretty much as I got it, tried to post here but hsm won't let me post attachments for some reason.

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...o-28-a-206108/

    And here's a couple videos on it, the first is just showing it and talking about a few things and the next video some work is getting done, I've got another uploading and still more to be made.

    http://youtu.be/87s0_Wr94Tc

    http://youtu.be/ndfzC_5d-8s

  • #2
    That's a cool bench top drill press, I didn't even know you could get camelback DPs that size. How do you plan on running your line shaft? Any other suitable equipment?

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    • #3
      I've got a nice older GE 1/6 hp motor I'm going to couple to a small diameter spool shaped pulley that will be wide enough to span the tight and loose pulleys and use a short endless belt, the end will have a bearing block on it for support so the motor bearings aren't stressed out. the shifting forks are integral with the drill and simple to fabricate, but I'll need to get someone to weld them, more on that later. The motor will be mounted either on a board next to the press or below the bench, haven't quite decided, I may mount the Perkins power hack saw next to the drill on the same bench and work out a single shaft and motor to drive both, could be a good setup but would probably use the 1/2 bp motor that's on it now, the only reason that 1/2 hp motor is needed is to kick everything off from dead stop, but I think if I run the 1/6 hp motor and start it on the loose pulley then shift to the tight pulley it will well, the motor is large for the hp and has gitz cups on it so will look right on the old machine and mounting it on the board or bench next to the drill will give easy access to the oilers.

      heres the catalogue they sold this drill in, you can see the shifting forks on the side, if you look one page doen there was the motor driven version as well that had a simple spur gear drive, you can see in the cut that the same casting was used, also look at the price difference!

      http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/153/1175.pdf
      Last edited by the kid; 12-19-2014, 12:57 AM. Reason: info added

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      • #4
        Cool!
        A guy with a nice peice that can leave it alone (bearings) and not go off the deep end with it!
        It's gorgeous!

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        • #5
          Thank you old hat, you'll me hear me talking near the end of this video about how I could go about doing the quill bearings and see why I'm avoiding it, and as I said in the first video it's effect is less than one might think, I must admit though it is very tempting and very easy to open up a can of worms when it comes to the bearings.

          Here's a video of some of what Ive done today, the end got cut off for some reason, but it's mostly me rambling on about the bearings at that point anyway lol so im not going to try and reupload it, it was giving me trouble getting it up there to begin with.

          http://youtu.be/Gn0-lQ_nqvQ

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          • #6
            Now you make me want to do mine.
            A rather large Camel-back, and the upper bearing is very loose.
            It's big enuff that I can get my small tig-torch in there with a bob-cap on it.

            Since I've had the opportunity to do so much phosphor-bronze lately
            I may just go ahead and re~line it. The hard part will be getting it past
            two and a half decades of what all my family has drug into the basement.

            Comment


            • #7
              Cute!

              You don't attach photos here, you can only link to them. Most people use a photo hosting site to store the images they link to.
              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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              • #8
                It may be hard but it's worth it, these old machines really are a pleasure to look at and to run, even if they are a bit slow, no sense in letting them sit idol and rusting, though the cast iron can sit for years and still clean up.

                Ok I had to remember the old imageshack password but I finally got it so here are a few stills of the drill, one before and a couple as it sits tonight, I'll have another video coming up soon as well on my progress, the videos really have more detail, I'm working on making them better but I'm kind of still figuring out the editing and have been having problems uploading, some of the ends have been cut off when I put them up and I'm not sure why, but anyhow here are the photos



                Here's another as I got it


                And here it is now


                Last edited by the kid; 12-21-2014, 08:15 AM. Reason: Fix link

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                • #9
                  Here's the original catalog page from vintagemachinery.org


                  A comparison



                  And here's the electric version, notice the se casting with the addition of a cast motor mount, spur gear drive, and the omission of the shifting forks, though the provisions are there in the casting for them, unfortunately there is no information listed on the original motors supplied with these units, though the one I intend to use for mine looks visually quite similar
                  Last edited by the kid; 12-21-2014, 08:25 AM.

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                  • #10
                    And here is the motor I intent to use, a 1/6hp GE, the hp seems low but these older motors are said to have more torque, it's actually larger diameter, though slightly shorter, than the more modern 1/2hp motor which is on the drill now





                    im messing with these stills trying to get them larger, when they are clicked for some reason the page gives share links and option to download, i downloaded one ant it works, but its annoying to have to view all the images that way, i dont know why HSM wont allow attachments to be posted direct to the site, it would really make things so much simpler, it was a real chore to get these up here, ,mods please fix this and enable attachments :/
                    Last edited by the kid; 12-21-2014, 08:30 AM. Reason: im messing with these stills trying to get them larger, when they are clicked for some reason the page gives share links and

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                    • #11
                      i dont know why HSM wont allow attachments to be posted direct to the site
                      I'm only speculating, but I'm sure that all the photos that have been linked to here amount to something in the terabyte range, and a website does have to pay for storage. It might bump up the overhead significantly to store the photos here. There may be other good reasons, but that's one.
                      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                        I'm only speculating, but I'm sure that all the photos that have been linked to here amount to something in the terabyte range, and a website does have to pay for storage. It might bump up the overhead significantly to store the photos here. There may be other good reasons, but that's one.
                        There's also the matter of who supplies the bandwidth to send a copy of the photo to your computer.
                        Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                        • #13
                          It seems if other sites can do it than so can hsm, I really don't think it would be too hard, but I won't obsess too much over it.

                          Here's a couple more videos I made on the progress in making, the second one focuses on my process and setup to lap in the table, enjoy.

                          http://youtu.be/piZl-V3M-tk

                          http://youtu.be/SWeLjO8aXNE

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                          • #14
                            I can't see the image on imageshack. The URLs they give are for a small size image. There is a button to download the image, and it is huge, but I was able to get the URL and post it here full size. Seems that forum software resizes the image to page size:



                            I have my resized images (I use MSPaint) on my own web storage, but I would suggest www.tinypic.com instead of ImageShack or PhotoBucket. They both seem to scream at you with annoying ads and pop-ups.
                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                            USA Maryland 21030

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                            • #15
                              The Corona's probably gone flat by now.
                              !!!===!!!===!!!
                              And notice to all!
                              Those beautiful clasic wood-inset screwdrivers (originals or replicas)
                              ARE DEATH TRAPS !!

                              My wife bought me a set for Christmas long ago.
                              Absent mindedly pulled one out of the tool-caddy one day........
                              ..........to use on 230 volts!!

                              Realised about an inch away.
                              Yes the box was live. It has to be in some cases.

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