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Re-restoring the mini camelback drill (Canedy Otto no. 28)

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  • the kid
    replied
    Got some more work done, made up a belt, more work on the table, and even drilled a hole! Very few things to do now, still need to complete fabrication of my shifting forks, my drift seems to work well in the mean time though for shifting the belt, and still need to wire in a switch for the motor.

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  • the kid
    replied
    I live in Southern California so we've got horror freight around here, I'll look in to getting on of those thermometers in the future. For now I've just done some work on the other motor I had on it before, remade my shaft, and remachined the shaft on the motor a bit, I still need to grab some bearings for it, I want to get some sealed ones in place, here's another video of my progress, I took the video a couple days ago and had trouble uploading it, the end kept getting cut off, so I had to delete it a couple times and re upload to get it all working.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by the kid View Post
    I didn't know that, I've always been of the school of thought that if an electric motor is too hot to touch than its overheating and there's a problem, but basicly what your saying is that unless it starts smoking it's ok?
    Sorta.

    Actually, a standard class of motor shouldn't go above about 115C in the hottest spot inside. Normally, it is assumed that the hot spot is about 10C hotter than you can measure, so the measured winding temp would be 105C, and the exterior of the motor might be as hot as maybe 80C, or around 170F, which isn't quite "smoking" hot, but is way too hot to be touching.

    Some standard motor classes can get 20 to 40 C hotter, but mostly the ones you run across are 115C types, or are best assumed to be.

    You don't give your location or country, but if there is a "harbor freight" store near you, they have non-contact thermometers which on sale are as cheap as 29 bucks. Those are great for motor checking.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 12-28-2014, 12:16 PM.

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  • the kid
    replied
    I didn't know that, I've always been of the school of thought that if an electric motor is too hot to touch than its overheating and there's a problem, but basicly what your saying is that unless it starts smoking it's ok?

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    use whatever motor, but I would be surprised if ANY sensible motor would overheat "just idling" the drill. "Overheating" is often somewhat subjective when discussing it, and gets tossed around....but it means something specific.

    Most folks assume that if they cannot touch the motor comfortably, it is "overheating", but that rarely is the case.

    Most motors are set up for a 40C rise, which is 72F, and will take a room temp motor to a temp that will scorch your hand.... Knock off 20F for hotspot (10C) and it's still a 50F rise, taking the motor to a temp you would not be able to safely take a shower in.

    At idle, not even loaded with a belt, the temp may still get up there to uncomfortable temps (for you, not for the motor).

    The supposedly "undersized" motor may be perfectly fine for it. (or not)

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  • the kid
    replied
    Yes, I'm not sure how exactly to do so though, also after a little further testing the old motor I wanted to run was a bit underpowered and was overheating just idling the drill, do rather than puts around with insufficient power I've gone back to the 1/2 horse motor I had on it before, which needed, and still needs a bit of work (replace el-cheapo bearings with good sealed bearings) and I've got my eye out now for a nice, old timey, 1/3-1/2 hp motor. I've made a mounting plate that will have the motor, shaft, pulley, and bearing on it as an assembly, so that I can mount the unit under the bench, on the ceiling, or wherever else I ultimatly decide, probably under the bench for convenience and space savings.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by the kid View Post
    Well I e done some more work on the mini camelback, made a mahogany pulley, and discovered the motor I've got runs the wrong direction,
    You DO know that most motors are reasonably easily reversed, right?

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  • JRouche
    replied
    I am enjoying your vids. Thanks for sharing.. JR

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  • the kid
    replied
    Well I e done some more work on the mini camelback, made a mahogany pulley, and discovered the motor I've got runs the wrong direction, here's a video of my progress and of the making of the pulley, which I'm quite happy with, I've got more video that needs to be edited together too and put up.

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  • tc429
    replied
    very cool- I love old stuff

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  • the kid
    replied
    I was thinking more in the early teens, the catalogue this is listed in isnt dated, but it's catalogue no. 12, so I'm thinking maybe that means 1912? The motor shown on the electric version looks quite early.

    Here's a link to a pdf of the catalogue http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/153/1175.pdf
    Last edited by the kid; 12-24-2014, 09:02 PM.

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  • tc429
    replied
    thats a neat oldie- about what year? guessings maybe late 20s?

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  • the kid
    replied
    Got some more work done on the drill, she's got oilers! I got some goodies from my favorite hardware store, and I've started work on my drive setup, and repaired my return spring. here's a couple videos:





    I'll edit in a few stills later on.

    Pics:







    Last edited by the kid; 12-24-2014, 08:55 PM.

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  • the kid
    replied
    Indeed they will, which is the reason so many (probably most actually) of the originals are so buggered up, I think I've either had to straitin and or regrind every one I've got, the little ones are probably harder to find too for this reason, I try to buy every perfect handle pattern tool I see, and coe's knife handle wrenches make for a nice companion as well.

    Here's another video on my progress, in this one I begin fabrication of the shifting fork assembly.


    Oh and I've gotten the pictures fixed, thanks again Paul for the suggestion to try tinypic, it was leaps and bounds better and simpler than imageshak, I'm sold!
    Last edited by the kid; 12-21-2014, 09:33 AM.

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  • Old Hat
    replied
    Originally posted by the kid View Post

    The screwdrivers you speak of are known as the perfect handle pattern, if your unhappy with yours send them to me and I'll insure that those death traps are disposed of properly and in a safe mannor! many companies made them over the years, the design goes back to the 1860s I think,raph.
    The grips are great, and they'll cary a shock-wave from a hammer realy great when needed.
    I'll hunt for a pic of a realy unusual use for an original later.
    Gotta Go.

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