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  • dp
    replied
    I also use the chuck face to align the cutter. I first set my compound to 29.5؛. I use this angle rather than 30؛ because I don't believe my compound's protractor and I'd rather fail on the side of caution. I align to the cutter and not the holder and this sometimes requires using a parallel or HSS blank to reach into the slot in the tool holder.

    Update: Some interesting factoids about the center gauge from Starrett.

    The numbers on the gauge provide the plunge depth of the cross slide to turn a sharp thread. If you don't want a sharp thread, and you shouldn't, you can zero your dial with a feeler gauge between the cutter and the work then use the number on the gauge for advancing your cross slide to depth.

    If you use your compound set to 30؛ then the advance of the compound for a sharp thread is 1/TPI inches. A TPI of 16 then would require advancing the compound 0.062" for a sharp thread. Use the feeler gauge to back off as needed to achieve a non-sharp thread.
    Last edited by dp; 12-24-2014, 04:10 PM.

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  • Old Hat
    replied
    Thanks!!
    Yup, three of em' on Ebay as I type.
    Pricey thO' maybe that's why mine is home-made.
    Last edited by Old Hat; 12-24-2014, 01:27 PM.

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  • RichR
    replied
    The base is a Starrett No. 392
    The fishtail is a Starrett No. C391

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  • Old Hat
    replied
    Please re-pic showing the complete identify~ing stamping.
    That way it's searchable, easy to make but easy~er to buy no?

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  • RichR
    replied
    This came mixed in with some tools I bought last year:

    I'd just assumed they all came with a base.

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  • Old Hat
    replied
    PS......... If you use cold-rolled heat it red-orange first, and let it cool evenly.
    That way it will be stress-free and not go bannana, when you ball/V cut it.

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  • loose nut
    replied
    I'll give it a shot.

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  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by Old Hat View Post
    Make this little puppy.
    Takes maybe what, a half hour. A tiny drop of super glue holds your fish in the V-rod.
    Oh, I like that.

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  • Old Hat
    replied
    Make this little puppy.
    Takes maybe what, a half hour. A tiny drop of super glue holds your fish in the V-rod.
    Last edited by Old Hat; 12-24-2014, 10:44 AM.

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  • wendtmk
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
    I agree with you but I find that I need three hands to hold it tight adjust the work and adjust the tool.

    I was just wondering if something better had come along.
    Tape it to the tool.

    Mark

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    But frankly, the fishtail gauge is fast and accurate enough for 99.9999% of any work either you or I will ever do.
    I agree with you but I find that I need three hands to hold it tight adjust the work and adjust the tool.

    I was just wondering if something better had come along.

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  • PixMan
    replied
    I most often use ER16 insert threading tools on my lathe and quickly set the the tool square to the work by placing a parallel across the face of the chuck (which I know runs true) and then bring the tool shank up to it with the toolpost a bit loose. Allow the 1" tool holder shank to come in full contact with the parallel, tighten (quick change) toolpost nut and off I go to threading!

    When using a hand ground HSS threading tool (very rare), I leave the tool loose in it's tool holder block with one set screw touching as the pivot point. bring the tool up to the thread gauge (fishtail) and snug up a second set screw. Snug the other one and double check. Always "good to go."

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  • RussZHC
    replied
    I sat and puzzled about this and then waited to see what others would post...I puzzled about what you are/were really asking since to me, it almost sounds like you are or have cut a thread on or with a taper that was not supposed to be that way...hence the question about "better" and squareness.

    The other part of the puzzledness (sic) was exactly what surface one could measure from to check squareness and then not move that surface when inserting the threading tool/threading cutting bit.
    I thought tool post or tool holder and either a square or 1-2-3 block (or, I guess for that matter, any gage block), or indicating that the compound is actually moving parallel to axis of lathe by indicating the edge/side of a some ground stock (IIRC someone did a video showing this indicating)...but none of this sounds correct since, to me, those are not really threading problems per se but lathe alignment issues.

    The other thing I thought it could be was trusting the accuracy of the degree marks on a given lathe. I think that has been answered by previous posting(s).

    Excuse the rambling/wrong tangent.
    Last edited by RussZHC; 12-22-2014, 09:23 PM.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    If the angles on the tool or insert are at a true 30 degrees to the shank, then you could just align the shank to either parallel to the faceplate or perpendicular to the the cross slide ways.

    But frankly, the fishtail gauge is fast and accurate enough for 99.9999% of any work either you or I will ever do. I mean, who has ever even seen a tolerance on the angle of the thread form? I'm sure one exists somewhere, but +/- 1 degree would be good enough for almost all threading.

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  • boslab
    replied
    A magnet on a "fishtail" is handy, but if as rightly mentioned the tool is ground right you gust square the tool off the chuck, same for insert tools.
    Or just guess like I do, joking of course!
    Mark

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