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Those holes on the back of outlets... the ones not to use.....not all the same

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  • Those holes on the back of outlets... the ones not to use.....not all the same

    Usually the little holes are for spring connections, and nobody with any sense will ever use them, because they are totally unreliable.

    However, this is the second time I have seen ones that are OK. In fact they are superior.

    Had to replace an outlet just now, actually a GFCI. Very inconvenient location, wasn't interested in doing it at 11PM, but my wife is cleaning, and it's the only outlet in-range of where she is cleaning. Besides that, it affects the bathroom lights as well as the outlet, because they have an associated outlet. Bathroom lights are apparently considered essential.....

    Instead of the stupid clips, this "spec-grade" GFCI had holes, but in the holes are wire clamps that screw down, so when you poke the wire through, you have to clamp it with the screw. A plate is pulled down by the screw, and clamps the wire, "just like a real connection". I had previously seen this on a plain outlet.

    Someone was actually thinking. Rare, but apparently it happens sometimes.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

  • #2
    Just installed a few outlets with 2 110v outlets with 2 usb outlets as the kids are always thieving the wall warts. These have the screw tightening holes on the back and a similar groove for the ground wire.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by 914Wilhelm View Post
      Just installed a few outlets with 2 110v outlets with 2 usb outlets as the kids are always thieving the wall warts. These have the screw tightening holes on the back and a similar groove for the ground wire.
      Wait a minute.......you have outlets that have usb connections useable for charging? I need about a hundred of them!
      Location: The Black Forest in Germany

      How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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      • #4
        Wow I just did a Google search and they exist! I need to get out more.
        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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        • #5
          Yes I have used those outlets as well and they are a treat. Don't have to bend the wire around the screw or nothin, just strip, insert, and screw.
          Andy

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
            Wait a minute.......you have outlets that have usb connections useable for charging? I need about a hundred of them!
            Yabut you have to downgrade your whole electrical system tp 110volts and then all the tractors have to be fitted with Harley engines to take advantage of the hammer and flint ignition systems.........................
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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            • #7
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post


              Instead of the stupid clips, this "spec-grade" GFCI had holes, but in the holes are wire clamps that screw down, so when you poke the wire through, you have to clamp it with the screw. A plate is pulled down by the screw, and clamps the wire, "just like a real connection". I had previously seen this on a plain outlet.

              Someone was actually thinking. Rare, but apparently it happens sometimes.
              Sounds like a standard UK outlet, not sure only had them for 40 odd years so you tend to ignore the obvious.
              Are you sure Capricorn One wasn't real ?
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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              • #8
                I have some UK outlets that aren't quite that nice but maybe that is because I bought them in Germany....
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                  Instead of the stupid clips, this "spec-grade" GFCI had holes, but in the holes are wire clamps that screw down, so when you poke the wire through, you have to clamp it with the screw. A plate is pulled down by the screw, and clamps the wire, "just like a real connection".

                  Those have been around for decades, certainly on commercial grade receptacles.

                  The "Chinese finger puzzle" connectors have improved to a degree where I trust them now. But I only buy brand name, good - commercial quality electricals. Figure $8 on up for a single receptacle. Avoid the contractor packs like the plague.
                  Gary


                  Appearance is Everything...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
                    Yabut you have to downgrade your whole electrical system tp 110volts and then all the tractors have to be fitted with Harley engines to take advantage of the hammer and flint ignition systems.........................
                    More seriously they're fat like twice the linear dimensions of a non-USB outlet so retrofitting can be a real party. 10 pounds of wire and outlet in a 5 pound box where a skinny traditional outlet wasn't even a squeeze. Just barely fit the standard dimensions like if theres a dent in the metal box you'll probably have to pound it flat.

                    My main annoyance is I've been in this game awhile and USB used to spec like 100 mA then they added weird funkiness with resistances between control leads fooling apple products into accepting 1 amp and then even more foolishness to signal ability to provide 2 amps. So I would expect in 5 years the 2020 ipad will have some funky looking thing resembling an arc welding connector yet with a USB on the end theoretically capable of providing 100 amps and I'll need to retrofit all my outlets AGAIN in the next couple years. Bugs me making a simple outlet a disposable commodity.

                    Also never buy one in a store, at least without checking Amazon first, because there's about 50 slightly different models and some have weirdness with little power switches or slightly oversize faceplate required or super picky about exact mounting or they only work on apple devices or don't work on apple devices or madness. Its not like edison base light bulbs where as long as it physically fits it'll work. They just aren't interchangeable commodities yet.

                    I was also going to make a joke about the end of VPTs post sounding more like my single dating days than installing a receptacle as my real world experience with receptacles always sounds more like "bash knuckles, cut finger on burr in the metal box, crack the plastic faceplate and realize I have no spares and the hardware store is closed till 7am tomorrow, cut wire to length twice and its still too short" seriously this stuff never goes according to plan.

                    Also my experience is, I demo and tell them they don't need their charger anymore and the first thing outta their mouth is thats very nice but they really want to charge them over there instead because interior decorator style or whatever. That's just great.

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                    • #11
                      So do these "stab holes" except 12-2? the reason the others are there is due to the fact that only 14-2 will stab, this helps keep the amperage down as the circuit can only be rated for so much with 14-2...

                      We still never used them - always used the side screws just for the concerns youv stated...

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                      • #12
                        You got hold of a decent grade receptacle! Professionals buy this type of "spec grade" or "hospital grade" unit almost exclusively because, just as J Tiers mentioned, it is a secure connection, and it is also much faster to install (as in hundreds on a construction project) than wraping the screw. And most good pros won't simply shove wire into a POS receptacle.

                        I would love to see them outlaw the shove in, 50 cent grade receptacles. Even though they are UL listed, they have a known propensity to prematurely fail. In a former life I used to have many service calls for entire rooms of home receptacles failing, only to find the first one in-line burned up (which is also why I pigtail all receptacles).

                        All of the plated type receptacles I've used do accept #12 wire. Most are also true 20 amp rated (horizontal neutral slot).
                        Last edited by garagemark; 12-31-2014, 02:28 PM.

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                        • #13
                          I've been ONLY using "spec grade" for years, but this is the one of the first times they have been a reasonable connection. Up to now they have generally been the standard "wrap it on the screw" type.

                          I've had the clamp type for decades on 3 phase plugs and sockets, of course. But that's a different deal.

                          And if you are in the biz of construction, you can get a better part than "spec grade" if you want to pay. But most contractors use the 49 cent trash just because they can and it's cheaper.

                          I've even specified type AC cable and had them cry and moan and try to triple the total job price over plain trashy NM cable. NM cable should be illegal.

                          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                          So do these "stab holes" except 12-2? the reason the others are there is due to the fact that only 14-2 will stab, this helps keep the amperage down as the circuit can only be rated for so much with 14-2...

                          We still never used them - always used the side screws just for the concerns youv stated...
                          Yes they do, it's a 20A rated GFCI. If you had this one, you'd use what you call the "stab" connections, because they are really a clamp type, and also trying to use the wrap connection is a real pain.... it's easier to use the good connection than the inferior.
                          Last edited by J Tiers; 12-31-2014, 06:21 PM.
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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