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How NOT to throw your lathe chuck key through the windshield

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  • How NOT to throw your lathe chuck key through the windshield

    One of my biggest fears in my small shop is not removing the chuck key from the lathe and accidentally starting it up and flinging it through the windshield of my "baby".....

    I figured out a way to solve this and wrote a quick article with lots of pictures on my web site

    www.rvbprecision.com

    Hope you enjoy it!

  • #2
    Clever!

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    • #3
      What stops one of those spider screws doing the same thing ?
      .

      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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      • #4
        that's one hi-tech solution --- or you can just install a light duty spring on your chuck key that takes a little pressure to push down and engage and no way can remain engaged after you let go of it...

        have to admit that's "stylin" though...


        good eye SJ,,, even though they are starting out at a much smaller radius they still can launch far enough to take out a windshield...

        crazy thing about chuck keys is they will hang on for the ride till they get up to maximum RPM's and then let go...
        Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 01-02-2015, 09:44 AM.

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        • #5
          Parking cars in garages is a waste of shop space.
          Jim H.

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          • #6
            Parking cars in garages is a waste of shop space.


            The spider screws have never come out in 15 years and if they did, I don't think they have enough mass or velocity to damage anything.

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            • #7
              If you happen to use variable DC or a VFD just setup an initial slow step then full ramp. I am also known to leave a chuck key in but because I have it set to ramp the key simply falls out instead of being flung across the room.

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              • #8
                I think it looks great and is very clever.

                John

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                • #9
                  The bit I don't understand is we are probably all driver on this forum and as such we have learnt to stop at traffic lights and road junctions.
                  We don't expect the local councils etc to install arrestor wires at every junction just in case we forget so why can't you use a machine correctly ??

                  How many times do you start up in reverse, wind the tool into the chuck because you have gone the wrong way ?

                  Sorry, either learn to use it correctly or put it back in it's box and don't play with it.

                  Incommmmming.......................
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rbertalotto View Post
                    I figured out a way to solve this and wrote a quick article with lots of pictures on my web site

                    www.rvbprecision.com

                    Hope you enjoy it!
                    Robert, let's play find the missing word in this statement: "I needed to create some type of interlock so I could start the lathe unless the chuck key was removed and stored somewhere."



                    I'm somewhat in agreement with John. Lots of things in life are important. But some things are REALLY IMPORTANT! e.g. "NEVER point a gun at someone you don't intend to shoot," "NEVER leave a chuck key in a chuck!

                    Ponder the really important things like that, along with the consequences, until a lasting impression is formed.

                    I think relying on external safeguards is the start of a stroll down the slippery slope of complacency.

                    ...however, I agree it is a clever, well implemented fix. Just don't someday start sticking something else in that interlock so you can hold on to the chuck key.
                    Last edited by lynnl; 01-02-2015, 10:44 AM.
                    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                    • #11
                      Neat idea!
                      I like it.
                      Mike

                      My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                      • #12
                        While I agree with Sir John regarding the proper use of machine tools, the attachment has the advantage of remembering where the chuck key has been left.
                        Jim H.

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                        • #13
                          It would be rude not to make the offer of storing that F4 here at my place in NW CT.
                          Not so far away that you couldn't come visit it now & then!
                          Len

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                          • #14
                            What John said....

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                            • #15
                              I remember seeing this approach in a 1950's vintage "Popular Mechanics" and numerous other venues since then so it's hardly original. I've seen many variants of the same idea for the drill press chuck key as well.

                              Plus, like John, I think that if you can't remember to remove the key you have no business using a lathe.
                              Regards, Marv

                              Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                              http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                              Location: LA, CA, USA

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